Queensland Places - Keiraville, Ipswich

This grand Ipswich residence, located in Roderick Street, has long been a part of the city’s history, dating from 1886. It is believed to have been built for the Cribb family by local building contractor, John Mackenzie, who originally acquired the land upon which Keiraville stands, in 1884. It is not clear who actually planned the building, but it is likely that the design was developed in close consultation with the Cribb family, as they purchased it from Mackenzie soon after its completion.

Keiraville is a single storey building of rendered masonry which, apart from some minor changes, remains largely unchanged since it was first constructed. Fortunately, most of the changes have only impacted on the rear of the building leaving its front appearance intact. The home remained in the Cribb family for many years before being used as a manse, for around forty years from 1938, by the adjoining Congregational Church. It should be noted that this new use is entirely logical, given that the Cribb family were prominent members of the Congregational Church. Later, Keiraville was used as the local headquarters for the Blue Nurses as well as eventually being used as a centre by Lifeline.

Keiraville’s importance within Ipswich’s history and development has been recognised by its inclusion in the Queensland Heritage Register as well within Ipswich itself, by an Ipswich City Council historical marker.

Keiraville, Ipswich. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland. Neg 195363

This photograph shows Keiraville in around 1900, with what appears to be a newly replaced roof and wide verandahs surrounded with lattice work, giving it an attractive presence in the local streetscape.

Brian Randall - Queensland Places Coordinator, State Library of Queensland

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Central and Central West Queensland have many fascinating houses, including one which hosted General Douglas MacArthur the Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in the Pacific in WWII, detailed in a new free online guide, Researching the History of Your Central Queensland Home: A guide to uncovering its past produced by Museum of Central Queensland. JOL (and readers) can download it for free at: http://www.mocq.org.au