2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages: Word of the Week - Week Fifty.

As part of State Library's commitment to the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages, we will be promoting a 'word of the week' from one of the 125+ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages and dialects from across Queensland.

State Library's IYIL2019 Word of the Week: Week 50.

State Library's 'word of the week' for Week Fifty is guugu , from the Guugu Yimithirr language of Hope Vale and surrounding region. It means 'language, speech, talk' and celebrates the oral nature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages.

Guugu Yimithirr SMS.

Hope Vale Community is actively using Guugu Yimithirr across the community in the IKC, school and even on SMS! Guugu Yimithirr is one of the languages featured in the current State Library's IYIL2019 Exhibitions.

Nathan Williams, Lauren Ericksen & Harold Ludwick

The story of Guugu Yimithirr language is part of the Spoken exhibition and features the language journeys of community members such as Harold Ludwick (above).

Gudaa bula Dyugi-dyugi. JUV 499.15 BOW

The work of the school and Pama Language Centre is showcased in the Jarjum Stories exhibition which celebrates the use of language in children's books and storytelling.

Join the conversation as we post a new word for each week!

Week Fifty 10-16 December 2019.

#slqIYIL #IYIL2019 #IYIL #IY2019WordoftheWeek #SLQIndigenousLanguages

Desmond Crump

Indigenous Languages Coordinator, State Library of Queensland

State Library of Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages Webpages

State Library of Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages Map

Jarjum stories: A kuril dhagun showcase focusing on children’s books and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. 19 October 2019-10 May 2020.

Spoken: celebrating Queensland languages: A major exhibition exploring the survival and revival of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages throughout Queensland. Join in the many talks and events to celebrate the rich and diverse languages spoken today. 21 November 2019 -19 April 2020.

UN IY2019 Links

UN International Year of Indigenous Languages webpages

UN International Year of Indigenous Languages Resources

References

The word of the week has been sourced from the following item in the State Library collections.

Source: Haviland, J. (1979) ‘Guugu Yimidhirr’, in Handbook of Australian languages. Vol 1. J 499.15 HAN

Further Reading

Other materials in the State Library collections relating to Guugu Yimithirr include the following:

Bowen, L. and Calley, K. (2016) Gudaa bula dyugi-dyugi = The dog and the chook. JUV 499.15 BOW

De Zwaan, J. (1969) A preliminary analysis of Gogo-Yimidjir: a study of the structure of the primary dialect of the Aboriginal language spoken at the Hopevale Mission in North Queensland. Q499.15 dez

Gordon, T. and Haviland, J. (1980) Milbi: Aboriginal tales from Queensland’s Endeavour RiverJUVQ 398.20994 GOR

Haviland, J. (1979) ‘Guugu Yimidhirr’, in Handbook of Australian languages. Vol 1. J 499.15 HAN Online version available.

Hope Vale Community Learning Centre (2006) Mangal-bungal: Clever with hands, baskets and stories woven by some of the women of Hopevale, Cape York Peninsula. P920.72 MAN

Koko Yalanji and Koko Yimidir people – spoken word Bible lessons. QKIT 781.629915 KOK

Roth, W. E. (1898-1903) “Reports to the Commissioner of Police and others, on Queensland aboriginal peoples 1898-1903.” FILM 0714

State Library of Queensland Indigenous Languages Project – Eric Deeral Digital Story

Sutton, P. (ed) (1974) Languages of Cape York: papers presented to the Linguistic Symposium, Part B, held in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies Biennial General Meeting, May 1974. Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies: Canberra. G 499.15 1976

Weblinks

Pama Language Centre

Hope Vale Art & Culture Centre

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