Shipping and immigration records online

Finding an ancestor’s arrival in Australia can be challenging, but there is an increasing number of ways to track them. Queensland State Archives, the National Archives of Australia and State Library of Queensland hold the major Australian shipping records for the 19th and 20th centuries. On Friday 3 August, as part of National Family History Month 2018, key staff from these three organisations came together to discuss their records and how to use them to discover your family history.

Drawing of migrants disembarking from a ship ca. 1885, State Library of Queensland, Neg. no. 62474, http://hdl.handle.net/10462/deriv/127188

Drawing of migrants disembarking from a ship ca. 1885, State Library of Queensland, Neg. no. 62474, http://hdl.handle.net/10462/deriv/127188

Queensland State Archives (QSA)

Other useful records include immigration agent records, which may provide details of where an immigrant went, and who employed them after their arrival, and land orders, which may help establish if a person was resident in Queensland at a particular time.

National Archives of Australia (NAA)




State Library of Queensland


Passenger list for the Quetta, 1886; Image: Queensland State Archives

Passenger list for the Quetta, 1886; Image: Queensland State Archives

View the full Shipping and immigration records online presentation now.

For information about State Library’s immigration resources, our family history resources and useful websites for family historians, see our family history webpage.

For help with your family history research, visit us at State Library, or use our Ask Us service for online research assistance.

Fiona Dixon, Librarian

Information Services

More information


/audio-video/webcasts/family-history

State Library family history web page - /resources/family-history

State Library immigration resources - /resources/family-history/immigration

Useful websites for family historians - /resources/family-history/websites

Ask Us service - /services/ask-us

Visit us - /visit-us

 

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As an expatriate Aussie living in the U.S., I am extremely grateful for the abundance of online records that help me trace my family history. My heartiest thanks to all of those who make this possible.
Sue Kirk