Glendower Award for an Emerging Queensland Writer

2019 Shortlist 

Glendower Award for an Emerging Queensland Writer

Congratulations to the finalists!

 

Little Birds by Sue Goldstiver

Judges' comments 

This impressive gothic novel, set on the Darling Downs in the 1870s and 1970s, weaves a dual narrative to create an eerie tale that reveals the power of stories and superstitions to shape our lives. With striking characterisation and an evocative sense of place, Little Birds is a well-written and compelling read.

 

About the author 

Sue Goldstiver is a writer of life stories and creative fiction, with both stirred by her fascination for capturing the essence of a person on paper.  She holds a Bachelor of Arts from Queensland University, and a Master of Arts & Media from Griffith University.  In 2012, her story ‘Empty Rooms’ was a finalist in the Carmel Bird Awards, and published online in the ‘Short Australian Stories’ series by Spineless Wonders.

The Still Point of Being by Karen Hollands

Judges' comments 

Set in 1940s Brisbane, when leprosy sufferers were confined to Peel Island, The Still Point of Being evocatively captures fifteen-year-old Matilda’s confusion and increasing sense of isolation as she is separated from her family, adapts to life on the island, and faces the possibility that she may never return.

 

About the author 

Karen Hollands is a Brisbane-based writer and school teacher. She has an MPhil. in Creative Writing from The University of Queensland and also holds an M.A. in Applied Linguistics and a PhD in Education. Karen began writing short stories in 2010. The Still Point of Being was submitted as a novella for her creative writing degree and was later re-written as a novel. Karen was awarded a place in the 2018 Hachette/QWC Manuscript Development Program and the 2018 ACT Writers Centre HardCopy Program. She is currently working on her second novel.

Henry Hamlet’s Heart by Rhiannon Ratcliffe Wilde

Judges' comments 

This charming coming-of-age story sees friends Henry and Len fall in love, a love that has until then been 'lying dormant like the flu'. The characters and their family dynamics feel agonisingly authentic, and the prose is witty and engaging. It's easy to get carried away by this story, which deftly breaks your heart and sticky-tapes it back together again.

About the author

Rhiannon Wilde is a high school English teacher from Brisbane’s inner north who loves coffee, poetry and dark humour (usually in that order), and writing stories, which has been her thing for as long as she can remember. Rhiannon’s particular interests are characters both real and imaginary, and the power of well-strung words to challenge and change us.