Scenes of ‘67

Perspectives on the 1967 Referendum

Download Scenes of '67 Activity Instructions  (PDF 311.7 KB)

Subject/Year: Modern History Unit 2

Exhibition: Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (7):
Examining significant movements for change in the twentieth century that led to change in society, including people’s attitudes and circumstances.

Overview:

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! provides a learning experience of an important moment in history through arts and artistic expression. The 1967 Referendum significantly changed the course of Australian history and impacted the lives of all Indigenous Australians, sometimes in ways that are still emerging today. Responses to and perceptions of the 1967 Referendum and its impacts are highly individual and personal.

For the 40th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum in 2007, the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts (ACPA) created a show called Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was performed at Queensland Performing Arts Centre under the artistic direction of Leah Purcell.

At the exhibition students can hear from past ACPA students and performers about the development process, historical research and performing, and how the experience impacted their
understanding of the campaign to be counted. After experiencing the exhibition or viewing theatre performances online, students can give their own voice to scenes from the play, and create a script – a current chapter in this story that demonstrates their knowledge and perspectives gained.

Because there are few items in the State Library collection directly related to the 1967 Referendum, kuril dhagun has chosen to partner with the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts
(ACPA) to showcase a creative response to the 1967 Referendum and create content for the exhibition. Some of this new content has been added to the State Library collection for future research use.

In this activity, students work in teams to familiarise themselves with the Reflections script, videos of scenes, and digital stories to explore the play’s messages. After the class views the archival
footage of the compelling opening scenes, each team works with the script and archival footage to analyse a chosen section of scene. The scenes offer first-hand accounts of the situation for
Indigenous peoples leading up to the 1967 Referendum, and reflections on its significance looking back at the event.

Teams can further collaborate by researching the issue, and finally adding their own voice as final scenes. These extra scenes created by students can be performed live or recorded as digital
video. For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.

(7): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum Senior Secondary Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

A summary of the tasks is below:

  • Task 1 Familiarisation

Students watch archival footage of the opening scenes and conduct initial research into the 1967 Referendum.

  • Task 2 Scene Selection and analysis

Students select a scene to work with, analyse the scene using archival footage of a performance and the script.

  • Task 3 Explore the perspectives

After listening to a digital story update on Reflections, teams consider how their perspective may have changed.

  • Task 4 Add your voice – a 2017 perspective fifty years on

Teams conduct further research to create a final scene that adds their voice, as well as newly-gained insights into the 1967 Referendum, and its impacts for Indigenous people and Australian society. For a more formal inquiry process, and extending the research, conduct Tasks 6 and 7 at this point or conduct further research as a follow-up.

  • Task 5 Share your scene and reflect

Teams share their scenes by reading or acting out and showing their chosen images, and reflect as a class. Students can write personal reflections.

Extension tasks

  • Task 6 Research a historical character from Reflections

Teams plan their research around an inquiry question they develop about one of the historical characters from Reflections, thinking about how they might draw first-hand accounts from the community.

  • Task 7 Conduct your research

Students conduct their research of historical characters as per their plan in Task 6.

  • Task 8 Present your findings

Students present their research findings.

Curriculum Links:
Knowledge/Content:

Students study TWO of the following twentieth century movements, including:

Recognition and rights of Indigenous peoples

This activity connects with a number of topics around recognition and rights of Indigenous peoples.

In particular:

  • The role of individuals and groups who supported the movement for Indigenous recognition and rights, including the methods they used and the resistance they encountered (ACHMH073)
  • The achievements of Indigenous peoples at the end of the 20th century, including the right to vote, land rights/native title, and attempt at reconciliation (ACHMH075)

But also connects with:

  • The basis on which the colonists claimed sovereignty and imposed control, including conquest, treaty and the doctrine of ‘terra nullius’; and the consequences for the legal status and land rights of Indigenous peoples (ACHMH071)
  • The nature of government policies and their impact on Indigenous peoples, for example protection, assimilation (including the Stolen Generations), and self-determination (ACHMH072)
  • The role of individuals and groups who supported the movement for Indigenous recognition and rights, including the methods they used and the resistance they encountered (ACHMH073)
  • The economic, political and social challenges and opportunities Indigenous peoples have faced, including the role of cultural activity in developing awareness in society (ACHMH074)
  • The continued efforts to achieve greater recognition, reconciliation, civil rights, and improvements in education and health (ACHMH076)

Outcomes:

  • Understand the key features of the movements for change, including the conditions that gave rise to these movements, the motivations and role of individuals and groups, and the short and long term consequences.
  • Understand the significance of these movements, the influence of ideas that were central in their development, and the methods employed.
  • Apply key concepts as part of a historical inquiry, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, significance, empathy, perspectives and contestability.
  • Use historical skills to investigate these movements in the modern period; judge the reliability and usefulness of sources and the value of different kinds of evidence; explore different interpretations and representations; and use a range of evidence to support and communicate an historical argument.

Skills:

  • Analyse, interpret and synthesise evidence from different types of sources to develop and sustain a historical argument (ACHMH054)
  • identify links between events to understand the nature and significance of causation, change and continuity over time (ACHMH047)
  • Frame questions to guide inquiry and develop a coherent research plan for inquiry (ACHMH050)
  • identify, locate and organise relevant information from a range of primary and secondary sources(ACHMH051)
  • Evaluate the reliability, usefulness and contestable nature of sources to develop informed judgements that support a historical argument (ACHMH055)
  • Analyse and account for the different perspectives of individuals and groups in the past(ACHMH056)
  • Evaluate critically different historical interpretations of the past, how they evolved, and how they are shaped by the historian’s perspective (ACHMH057)
  • Communicate historical understanding by selecting and using text forms appropriate to the purpose and audience (ACHMH060)

Activity:

For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.

Scenes of ‘67
Perspectives on the 1967 Referendum

Subject/Year: Year 10 History

Exhibition: Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (8):
How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes since 1945?

Overview:

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! provides a learning experience of an important moment in history through arts and artistic expression. The 1967 Referendum significantly changed the course of Australian history and impacted the lives of all Indigenous Australians, sometimes in ways that are still emerging today. Responses to and perceptions of the 1967 Referendum and its impacts are highly individual and personal.

For the 40th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum in 2007, the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts (ACPA) created a show called Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was performed at Queensland Performing Arts Centre under the artistic direction of Leah Purcell.

At the exhibition students can hear from past ACPA students and performers about the development process, historical research and performing, and how the experience impacted their
understanding of the campaign to be counted.

After experiencing the exhibition or viewing theatre performances online, students can give their own voice to scenes from the play, and create a script — a current chapter in this story that
demonstrates their knowledge and perspectives gained.

Because there are few items in the State Library collection directly related to the 1967 Referendum, kuril dhagun has chosen to partner with the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts
(ACPA) to showcase a creative response to the 1967 Referendum and create content for the exhibition. Some of this new content has been added to the State Library collection for future
research use.

(8): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum v8.3 F-10 http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

Curriculum Links:
Knowledge/Content:

The major movements for rights and freedoms in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies (ACOKFH022)

  • Identifying the major movements for rights and freedom in the world (including the US Civil Rights movement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movements, women’s movements)

Depth Study 2: Rights and Freedoms 1945 – the present

The significance of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders: 1962 right to vote federally; 1965 right to vote in Queensland; 1967 Referendum; Reconciliation; Mabo decision; Bringing Them Home Report (the Stolen Generations), the Apology (ACDSEH106)

  • Describing the aims, tactics and outcomes of a particular event in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ struggle for rights and freedoms
  • Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the role of ONE individual or group in the struggle (ACDSEH134) Investigating the role of Charles Perkins in the Freedom Ride of 1965 and the efficacy of television in bringing the struggle for rights and freedoms to national attention

The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and throughout the world, such as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) (ACDSEH143)

  • Identifying areas (for example, education, health, work) that are the focus for continued civil rights action for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

Skills:

  • Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places (ACHHS182)
  • Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform historical inquiry (ACHHS184)
  • Evaluate and enhance these questions (ACHHS185)
  • Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS186)
  • Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS187)
  • Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in an historical argument (ACHHS188)
  • Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS189)
  • Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS190)
  • Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS193)

Activity:

For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.

Scenes of ‘67

Perspectives on the 1967 Referendum

Subject/Year: Year 10 English

Exhibition: Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (9):
Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, discussions, literary analyses, transformations of texts and reviews.

Overview

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! provides a learning experience of an important moment in history through arts and artistic expression. The 1967 Referendum significantly changed the course of Australian history and impacted the lives of all Indigenous Australians, sometimes in ways that are still emerging today. Responses to and perceptions of the 1967 Referendum and its impacts are highly individual and personal.

For the 40th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum in 2007, the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts (ACPA) created a show called Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was performed at Queensland Performing Arts Centre under the artistic direction of Leah Purcell.

At the exhibition students can hear from past ACPA students and performers about the development process, historical research and performing, and how the experience impacted their understanding of the campaign to be counted.

After experiencing the exhibition or viewing theatre performances online, students can give their own voice to scenes from the play, and create a script – a current chapter in this story that demonstrates their knowledge and perspectives gained.

Because there are few items in the State Library collection directly related to the 1967 Referendum, kuril dhagun has chosen to partner with the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts (ACPA) to showcase a creative response to the 1967 Referendum and create content for the exhibition. Some of this new content has been added to the State Library collection for future research use.

In this activity, students work in teams to familiarise themselves with the Reflections script, videos of scenes, and digital stories to explore the play’s messages. After the class views the archival footage of the compelling opening scenes, each team works with the script and archival footage to analyse a chosen section of scene. The scenes offer first hand accounts of the situation for Indigenous peoples leading up to the 1967 Referendum, and reflections on its significance looking back at the event.

Teams can further collaborate by researching the issue, and finally adding their own voice as final scenes. These extra scenes created by students can be performed live or recorded as digital video. For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.

(9): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum v8.3 F-10 Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

A summary of the tasks is below:

  • Task 1 Familiarisation

Students watch archival footage of the opening scenes and conduct initial research into the 1967 Referendum.

  • Task 2 Scene Selection and analysis

Students select a scene to work with and analyse the scene using archival footage of a performance and the script.

  • Task 3 Explore the perspectives

After listening to a digital story update on Reflections, teams consider how their perspective may have changed.

  • Task 4 Add your voice – a 2017 perspective fifty years on

Teams conduct further research to create a final scene that adds their voice, as well as newly-gained insights into the 1967 Referendum, and its impacts for Indigenous people and Australian society

  • Task 5 Share your scene and reflect 

Teams share their scenes by reading or acting out and showing their chosen images, and reflect as a class. Students can write personal reflections.

  • Task 6 Personal Reflections

Students individually write a reflection or exegesis describing their creative process. Extension task

  • Task 7 End scene Digital story/ Digital video production

Teams create a digital story/digital video/sound recording of their end scene.

  • Task 8 Final Scenes production

Students collaborate with others, bringing final scenes together to see what message emerges when it comes together. This can be done as a video or live production.

Curriculum Links:
Knowledge/Content:

Analyse and evaluate how people, cultures, places, events, objects and concepts are represented in texts, including media texts, through language, structural and/or visual choices (ACELY1749)

  • Considering ethical positions across more than one culture as represented in text and consider the similarities and differences
  • Questioning the representation of stereotypes of people, cultures, places, events and concepts, and expressing views on the appropriateness of these representations
  • Identifying and explaining satirical events, including events in other cultures, for example depictions in political cartoons
  • Identifying and evaluating poetic, lyrical language in the depiction of people, culture, places, events, things and concepts in texts
  • Analysing the ways socio-cultural values, attitudes and beliefs are presented in texts by comparing the ways news is reported in commercial media and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander media

Outcomes:

Students

  • Show how the selection of language features can achieve precision and stylistic effect
  • Explain different viewpoints, attitudes and perspectives through the development of cohesive and logical arguments.
  • Develop their own style by experimenting with language features, stylistic devices, text structures and images
  • Create texts to articulate complex ideas
  • Make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, building on others’ ideas, solving problems, justifying opinions and developing and expanding arguments
  • Demonstrate understanding of grammar, vary vocabulary choices for impact, and accurately use spelling and punctuation when creating and editing texts

Activity:

For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.

Scenes of ‘67
Perspectives on the 1967 Referendum

Subject/Year: Senior English Unit 2

Exhibition: Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (10):
How ideas and attitudes are represented in texts, how they are constructed to influence responses, and how to experiment with different text structures for different audiences.

Overview:

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! provides a learning experience of an important moment in history through arts and artistic expression. The 1967 Referendum significantly changed the course of Australian history and impacted the lives of all Indigenous Australians, sometimes in ways that are still emerging today. Responses to and perceptions of the 1967 Referendum and its impacts are highly individual and personal.

For the 40th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum in 2007, the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts (ACPA) created a show called Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was performed at Queensland Performing Arts Centre under the artistic direction of Leah Purcell.

At the exhibition students can hear from past ACPA students and performers about the development process, historical research and performing, and how the experience impacted their understanding of the campaign to be counted.

After experiencing the exhibition or viewing theatre performances online, students can give their own voice to scenes from the play, and create a script – a current chapter in this story that demonstrates their knowledge and perspectives gained.

Because there are few items in the State Library collection directly related to the 1967 Referendum, kuril dhagun has chosen to partner with the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts (ACPA) to showcase a creative response to the 1967 Referendum and create content for the exhibition. Some of this new content has been added to the State Library collection for future research use.

In this activity, students work in teams to familiarise themselves with the Reflections script, videos of scenes, and digital stories to explore the play’s messages. After the class views the archival footage of the compelling opening scenes, each team works with the script and archival footage to analyse a chosen section of scene. The scenes offer first-hand accounts of the situation for Indigenous Peoples leading up to the Referendum, and reflections on its significance looking back at the event.

Teams can further collaborate by researching the issue, and finally adding their own voice as final scenes. These extra scenes created by students can be performed live or recorded as digital video. For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.

(10): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum Senior Secondary Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

A summary of the tasks is below:

  • Task 1 Familiarisation

Students watch archival footage of the opening scenes and conduct initial research into the 1967 Referendum.

  • Task 2 Scene Selection and analysis

Students select a scene to work with and analyse the scene using archival footage of a performance and the script.

  • Task 3 Explore the perspectives

After listening to a digital story update on Reflections, teams consider how their perspective may have changes.

  • Task 4 Add your voice – a 2017 perspective fifty years on

Teams conduct further research to create a final scene that adds their voice, as well as newly-gained insights into the 1967 Referendum, and its impacts for Indigenous people and Australian society.

  • Task 5 Share your scene and reflect

Teams share their scenes by reading or acting out and showing their chosen images, and reflect as a class. Students can write personal reflections.

  • Task 6 Personal Reflections

Students individually write a reflection or exegesis describing their creative process.

Extension task

  • Task 7 End scene Digital story/ Digital video production

Teams create a digital story/digital video/sound recording of their end scene.

  • Task 8 Final Scenes production

Students collaborate with others, bringing final scenes together to see what message emerges when it comes together. This can be done as a video or live production.

Curriculum Links:

Content:

Analysing the style and structure of texts including digital texts (ACEEN022).

Investigate the representation of ideas, attitudes and voices in texts including:

  • Analysing the ways language features, text structures and stylistic choices shape points of view and influence audiences (ACEEN024)
  • Evaluating the effects of rhetorical devices, for example, emphasis, emotive language and imagery in the construction of argument (ACEEN025)
  • Analysing how attitude and mood are created, for example, through the use of humour in satire and parody (ACEEN027)

Analyse and evaluate how and why responses to texts vary through:

  • The impact of language and structural choices on shaping own and others’ perspectives (ACEEN028)
  • The ways ideas, attitudes and voices are represented, for example, how events are reported differently in the media (ACEEN029)
  • The interplay between imaginative, persuasive and interpretive techniques, for example, how anecdotes are used in speeches to amuse, inform or influence, or the use of characterisation in advertising (ACEEN030)

Create a text to:

  • Using imaginative, interpretive and persuasive elements for different purposes, contexts and audiences (ACEEN032)
  • Experimenting with text structures, language features and multimodal devices (ACEEN033)
  • Developing and sustaining voice, tone and style (ACEEN034)

Reflect on their own and others’ texts by

  • Analysing the values and attitudes expressed in texts (ACEEN038)
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of texts in representing ideas, attitudes and voices (ACEEN039)

Outcomes:

Students will:

  • Understand the ways in which ideas and attitudes are represented in texts
    Examine the ways texts are constructed to influence responses
    Create oral, written and multimodal texts that experiment with text structures and language features for particular audiences, purposes and contexts.

Activity:

For further details on this activity, refer to the Scenes of ’67 Activity Instructions.