Participate!

The modes and language of protest

Download Participate! Activity Instructions  (PDF 252.0 KB)

Subject/Year: Year 10 History

Exhibitions: Freedom Then, Freedom Now and Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (4):
How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in the last fifty years?

Overview:

Students explore the media aspects of the Freedom Then, Freedom Now exhibition and potentially Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! and develop a ‘modern day’ media campaign for one of the areas listed, choosing a perspective they which to take. Developing a campaign helps students to take a perspective on an issue and look at how popular views and beliefs are influenced, and the interplay with global movements and causes. The main emphasis is on developing skills of perspective, and different forms of expression, in print and social media.

For year 10 History students, these tasks offer some alternative activities to the other exhibition programs. For full details on tasks, refer to the Participate! Activity Instructions. A summary of the tasks for this activity is below:

  • Task 1 Quick Analysis of Protest Materials

Students analyse a selection of protest materials and actions using Participate! Quick Analysis Template.

  • Task 2 Analyse two items of a topic of interest

Each team chooses a topic that is of interest and analyses and compares two items using the Participate! Quick Analysis Template.

  • Task 3 Create a backstory around your topic using historic images

Use the State Library resources to locate images to tell the backstory. History students can conduct further research.

  • Task 4 Create a slogan and hashtag

Students select a current issue related to their topic and create a slogan and hashtag for a contemporary issue to create a campaign around it.

  • Task 5 Plan your campaign

Students plan a campaign launch that includes an event and social media channels.

  • Task 6 Create a set of Social Media Campaign Materials

Students create a selection of campaign materials.

(4): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum v8.3 F-10 Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

Curriculum Links:

Knowledge/Content:

The major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies (ACOKFH022)

  • Identifying the major movements for rights and freedom in the world (including the US Civil Rights movement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movements, women’s movements)
  • Recognising the continuing nature of civil rights movements in the twentieth century

Globalising influences – Popular culture post 1945: Continuity and change in beliefs and values that have influenced the Australian way of life (ACDSEH149)

  • Describing significant examples of continuity and change in beliefs and values, such as democratic ideals, religious beliefs, egalitarianism

Skills:

Perspectives and Interpretations

  • Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS190)
  • Identify and analyse different historical interpretations (including their own) (ACHHS191)

Explanation and Communication

  • Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS193)

Outcomes:

  • Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives.
  • Students explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.

Activity:

For full details on tasks, refer to the Participate! Activity Instructions.

Participate!
The modes and language of protest

Subject/Year: Senior English: Unit 2

Exhibitions: Freedom Then, Freedom Now and Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (5):
How ideas and attitudes are represented in texts, how they are constructed to influence responses, and to experiment with different text structures for different audiences.

Overview:

Students explore the media aspects of the Freedom Then, Freedom Now exhibition and potentially Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! and develop a ‘modern day’ media campaign, for one of the areas listed - choosing what perspective they which to take. A summary of the tasks for this activity is below. For full details on tasks, refer to the Participate! Activity Instructions.

  • Task 1 Quick Analysis of Protest Materials

Students use a template to analyse a selection of protest materials and actions.

  • Task 2 Analyse two items of a topic of interest

Each team chooses a topic that is of interest and analyses and compares two items using the template.

  • Task 3 Create a backstory around your topic using historic images

Use the State Library resources to locate images to tell the backstory. History students can
conduct further research.

  • Task 4 Create a slogan and hashtag

Students select a current issue related to their topic and create a slogan and hashtag for a
contemporary issue to create a campaign around it.

  • Task 5 Plan your campaign

Students plan a campaign launch that includes an event and social media channels

  • Task 6 Create a set of Social Media Campaign Materials

Students create a selection of campaign materials.

(5): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum Senior Secondary Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

Curriculum Links:
Knowledge/Content:

Compare texts in a variety of contexts, mediums and modes by

  • Analysing the ways language features, text structures and stylistic choices shape points of view and influence audiences (ACEEN024)
  • Evaluating the effects of rhetorical devices, for example, emphasis, emotive language and imagery in the construction of argument (ACEEN025)
  • The impact of language and structural choices on shaping own and others’ perspectives (ACEEN028)
  • The ways ideas, attitudes and voices are represented, for example, how events are reported differently in the media (ACEEN029)
  • The interplay between imaginative, persuasive and interpretive techniques, for example, how anecdotes are used in speeches to amuse, inform or influence, or the use of characterisation in advertising (ACEEN030)
  • Analysing changing responses to texts over time and in different cultural contexts (ACEEN031)

Create range of texts

  • Using imaginative, interpretive and persuasive elements for different purposes, contexts and audiences (ACEEN032)
  • Experimenting with text structures, language features and multimodal devices (ACEEN033)
  • Analysing the values and attitudes expressed in texts (ACEEN038)
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of texts in representing ideas, attitudes and voices (ACEEN039)
  • Explaining how and why texts position readers and viewers (ACEEN040)

Outcomes:

  • Understand the ways in which ideas and attitudes are represented in texts
  • Examine the ways texts are constructed to influence responses
  • Create oral, written and multimodal texts that experiment with text structures and language features for particular audiences, purposes and contexts.

Activity:

For full details on this activity and its tasks, refer to the Participate! Activity Instructions.

Participate!
The modes and language of protest

Subject/Year: English Year 10

Exhibition: Freedom Then, Freedom Now

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (6):

Interpret, create, evaluate, discuss and perform a wide range of literary texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts, including newspapers, film and digital texts, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, dramatic performances and multimodal texts, with themes and issues involving levels of abstraction, higher order reasoning and intertextual references. Students develop critical understanding of the contemporary media and the differences between media texts.

Overview:

Students explore the media aspects of the Freedom Then, Freedom Now exhibition and develop a ‘modern day’ media campaign, for one of the areas listed — choosing the perspective they which to take. A summary of the tasks for this activity is below. For full details on tasks, refer to the Participate! Activity Instructions.

For history students, this is lighter activity in terms of a campaign. Some of the tasks could be a follow-up from the other programs

  • Task 1 Quick Analysis of Protest Materials

Students use a template to analyse a selection of protest materials and actions.

  • Task 2 Analyse two items of a topic of interest

Each team chooses a topic that is of interest and uses a template to analyse and compare two items.

  • Task 3 Create a backstory around your topic using historic images

Use the State Library resources to locate images to tell the backstory. History students can conduct further research.

  • Task 4 Create a slogan and hashtag

Students select a current issue related to their topic and create a slogan and hashtag for a contemporary issue to create a campaign around it.

  • Task 5 Plan your campaign

Students plan a campaign launch that includes an event and social media channels.

  • Task 6 Create a set of Social Media Campaign Materials

Students create a selection of campaign materials.

(6): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum v8.3 F-10 Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

Curriculum Links:
Knowledge/Content:

Identify and explore the purposes and effects of different text structures and language features of spoken texts, and use this knowledge to create purposeful texts that inform, persuade and engage (ACELY1750)

  • Applying knowledge of spoken, visual, auditory, technical and multimodal resources (for example sound and silence, camera shot types, lighting and colour) in conjunction with verbal
    resources for varying purposes and contexts
  • Selecting subject matter and language to position readers to accept representations of people, events, ideas and information

Outcomes:

  • Students evaluate how text structures can be used in innovative ways by different authors. They explain how the choice of language features, images and vocabulary contributes to the development of individual style.
  • Students develop and justify their own interpretations of texts. They evaluate other interpretations, analysing the evidence used to support them. They listen for ways features within texts can be manipulated to achieve particular effects.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

  • Students show how the selection of language features can achieve precision and stylistic effect. They explain different viewpoints, attitudes and perspectives through the development
    of cohesive and logical arguments. They develop their own style by experimenting with language features, stylistic devices, text structures and images.
  • Students create a wide range of texts to articulate complex ideas. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, building on others’ ideas, solving problems, justifying opinions and developing and expanding arguments. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, vary vocabulary choices for impact, and accurately use spelling and punctuation when creating and editing texts.

Activity:

For full details on tasks for this activity, refer to the Participate! Activity Instructions.