Freedoms, Rights and Movements:

Identifying Freedoms and Global Movements

Download Freedoms, Rights and Movements Activity Instructions  (PDF 293.2 KB)

Subject/Year: History Year 10

Exhibition: Freedom Then, Freedom Now

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (1):

How was Australian society affected by other significant global events since the Second World War?

Overview:

The Freedom Then, Freedom Now exhibition explores the changes in freedoms and civil rights, including Indigenous Rights in Queensland over mainly the last 65 years. The complementary exhibition Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! provides further examination of Indigenous rights and the 1967 Referendum. Both exhibitions are relevant to the program Freedoms, Rights and Movements but emphasis in this learning pack is on Freedom Then, Freedom Now.

This activity focuses on the eight themes explored in Freedom Then, Freedom Now:*

  • Vote and protest
  • A home of your own
  • ‘I Do’
  • Drink, smoke ‘n gamble
  • Vaccinate
  • Dress
  • On the road, in the air
  • Too rude for Queensland?

In the exhibition, students can identify the freedoms explored by each of the themes, understand how these relate to the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, where there might be
conflicting rights, and how these rights are respected and enacted today.

If students attend the exhibition, they can use their Freedoms Manifest Task Sheet they completed as part of their visit. Otherwise the task sheet can be accessed online and act as a good starting point in class, while using the exhibition materials available online.

Each activity explores the dimension of civil rights and freedoms and are designed as team activities.

Note: For full details on tasks, refer to the Freedoms, Rights and Movements Activity Instructions.

(1) Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum v8.3 F-10 Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

A summary of the tasks for this activity is below:

Core Tasks

  • Task 1 Review Freedoms Manifest Task Sheet

Students complete and review the Freedoms Manifest to understand the types of freedoms and civil rights that exist, who may be impacted, and their importance today.

  • Task 2 UN Human Rights Audit

Students use the exhibition materials to assess how well this snapshot of Queensland measures up to our international human rights obligations as outlined in the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights.

  • Task 3 Where are our rights today?

Students revisit themes of the exhibition to assess where Queensland, and Australia, is now in terms of human rights, looking for global influences.

  • Task 4 UN Indigenous rights

Students extend their exploration to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People which was not developed until 2007.

History Extension Tasks

  • Task 5 Global Influences Timeline

Students elect one specific rights issue and trace the global influences creating a visual timeline.

  • Task 6 Blog a perspective

Create a character and give a narrative account that might be written as a blog story, and explore a particular freedom issue for them in three different decades.

Curriculum Links

Knowledge/Content

The major movements for rights and freedoms in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies (ACOKFH022).

  • Identifying the major movements for rights and freedom in the world (including the United States Civil Rights movement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movements in Australia, and women’s movements)
  • Recognising the continuing nature of civil rights movements in the twentieth century, such as the struggle for democracy in Burma

Developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and sustainability (ACOKFH024).

  • Brainstorming forms of technology that have affected what people see and hear, where they go, and how they live
  • Tracing key developments in technology since 1918 that have changed the world in the following areas: the household (radio, television, and appliances), travel and trade (shipping and passenger jets), and communications (invention of the microchip, satellites, and digital technologies)

Outcomes

  • They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance.
  • Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time.
  • They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources
    to identify motivations, values and attitudes.
  • Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument.

Skills

Historical questions and research

  • Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places (ACHHS182)
  • Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS183)
  • Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform historical inquiry (ACHHS184)
  • Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS186)

Analysis and use of sources

  • Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in an historical argument (ACHHS188)

Perspectives and interpretations

  • Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS190)
  • Identify and analyse different historical interpretations (including their own) (ACHHS191)

Explanation and communication

  • Develop texts, particularly descriptions and discussions that use evidence from a range of sources that are referenced (ACHHS192)
  • Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS193)

Activity

Refer to the Freedoms, Rights and Movements Activity Instructions for details.

Freedoms, Rights and Movements
Identifying Freedoms and contentions

Subject/Year: Civics and Citizenship Year 10

Exhibition: Freedom Then, Freedom Now

Key Inquiry Question/Aim (2):
How are government policies shaped by Australia’s international legal obligations?

Overview

The Freedom Then, Freedom Now exhibition explores the changes in freedoms and civil rights in Queensland over mainly the last 65 years. The exhibition includes but does not exclusively address Indigenous rights. The complementary exhibition Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! provides further examination of Indigenous rights and the 1967 Referendum. Both exhibitions are relevant to the program Freedoms, Rights and Movements but emphasis in this learning pack is on Freedom Then, Freedom Now.

This activity focuses on the eight themes explored in Freedom Then, Freedom Now:

  • Vote and protest
  • A home of your own
  • ‘I Do’
  • Drink, smoke ‘n gamble
  • Vaccinate
  • Dress
  • On the road, in the air
  • Too rude for Queensland?

In the exhibition students can identify the freedoms explored by each of the themes, understand how these relate to the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, where there might be conflicting rights, and how these rights are respected and enacted today.

If students attend the exhibition, they can use their Freedoms Manifest Task Sheet they completed as part of their visit. Otherwise the task sheet can be accessed online and act as a good starting point in class, while using the exhibition materials available online.

Each activity explores the dimension of civil rights and freedoms and are designed as team activities. Note for full details on tasks, refer to the Freedoms, Rights and Movements Activity Instructions.

(2): Curriculum references in terms of aim, inquiry question, knowledge, content, outcomes and skills are drawn from the Australian Curriculum v8.3 F-10 Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

A summary of the tasks for this activity is below:

Core Activity Tasks

  • Task 1 Review Freedoms Manifest Task Sheet

Students complete and review the Freedoms Manifest Task Sheet to understand the types of freedoms and civil rights that exist, who may be impacted, and their importance today.

  • Task 2 UN Human Rights Audit

Students use the exhibition materials to assess how well this snapshot of Queensland measures up to our international human rights obligations as outlined in the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights

  • Task 3 Where are our rights today?

Students revisit themes of the exhibition to assess where Queensland, and Australia is now in terms of human rights looking for global influences.

  • Task 4 United Nations Indigenous rights

Students extend their exploration to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which was not developed and ratified until 2007.

Civics and Citizenship Extension Tasks

  • Task 7 Defining a wicked policy problem

Students elect one of the areas and plan a policy research task to better align a current issue with our international responsibilities.

  • Task 8 Research and develop a policy proposal

Students take the next step to research and develop an evidence based policy proposal – a two-page briefing for a government minister.

Curriculum Links

Knowledge/Content:

The Australian Government’s role and responsibilities at a global level, for example provision of foreign aid, peacekeeping, participation in international organisations and the United Nations (ACHCK091)

  • Investigating Australia’s involvement with the United Nations (for example, representation in the organisation and adherence to conventions and declarations that Australia has ratified)

How Australia’s international obligations shape Australian Law and government policies, including in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (ACHCK093)

  • Listing some of the international agreements Australia has ratified and identifying examples of how each one might shape government policies and laws
  • Researching the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • Identifying how international conventions and declarations have shaped Australian government policies with regard to Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders
  • Recognising that the obligations in international treaties only take domestic effect in Australia if they are implemented by statute, whether by the Commonwealth or state parliaments. The challenges to and ways of sustaining a resilient democracy and cohesive society (ACHCK094)
  • Exploring the concept of ‘cohesive society’ using examples from contemporary events in Australia or in other countries to identify factors that support cohesiveness

Outcomes

  • Students analyse the Australian Government’s global roles and responsibilities
  • Students evaluate a range of factors that sustain democratic societies.
  • Students account for and evaluate different interpretations and points of view on civil rights and citizenship issues.
  • When planning for action, students take account of multiple perspectives and ambiguities, use democratic processes, and negotiate solutions to an issue.
  • Students develop and present evidenced-based arguments incorporating different points of view on civics and citizenship issues.
  • Students use appropriate texts, subject-specific language and concepts.
  • Students evaluate ways they can be active and informed citizens in different contexts.

Skills

  • Critically evaluate information and ideas from a range of sources in relation to civics and citizenship topics and issues (ACHCS097)
  • Account for different interpretations and points of view (ACHCS098)
  • Recognise and consider multiple perspectives and ambiguities, and use strategies to negotiate and resolve contentious issues (ACHCS099)
  • Use democratic processes to reach consensus on a course of action relating to a civics or citizenship issue and plan for that action (ACHCS100)
  • Present evidence-based civics and citizenship arguments using subject-specific language (ACHCS101)
  • Reflect on their role as a citizen in Australian, regional and global contexts (ACHCS102)

Activity

For further details on the activities, refer to the Freedoms, Rights and Movements Activity Instructions.