Talbot Family Treasures Wall
Guide script (all grades)

Download the Talbot Family Treasures Wall guide script (PDF 254.5 KB)

Inquiry questions:

  • What was life like for soldiers serving overseas?
  • How did recruitment take place in Queensland?
  • How did Queensland respond to the end of the war?
  • How did ANZAC Day commemorations begin in Queensland?

Guide resources

  • Script

Student resources

  • Photograph analysis sheet

Welcome students and introduce tour

Welcome to the Talbot Family Treasures Wall.

This wall is covered in a series of photographs taken in both Queensland and overseas where Queensland troops fought and trained. Historians use photographs all the time to learn about the past and today; using photographs found on this wall, you’re going to do the same.

First of all, as a group we’re going to analyse a few photographs and look for clues that might provide us with information as to where it was taken, why it was taken and what it tells us about the past. Using the information from the photograph and by thinking about what you have learnt today, I will then ask you to put forward a hypothesis or idea about what you think is happening in the photograph.

Once you have done this, I am going to tell you what is really happening in the photograph and we will see how good your detective skills are by comparing your hypothesis against the real story.

After we’ve analysed about 4 or 5 photographs as a group, you’re then going to break into smaller groups and have a go yourselves.

Clarify that students understand.

Let’s start.

Photograph 1

Point students to this photograph.

Privates from the 9th Battalion enjoying a camel ride near the Pyramids Egypt  

Analysis Questions

Where was this photo taken? Egypt
How can you tell? Sphinx and Pyramid in background
Who is in the photograph? Australian soldiers
How do you know they are Australian? Slouch hat/uniform
Read the text below, what does it say?
Privates from the 9th battalion enjoying a camel ride near the pyramids, Egypt, 1914
Is there anything else you notice about this photograph which might help us work out what is happening in it?

 

 

 

Now you have gathered information through answering these questions, I want you to think about what else you have learnt today that could provide you with some clues as to what is happening in this photograph. Think about these questions.
When do you think this photograph was taken – early 1914 or late 1914? Late 1914
Why do you think this? Britain declared war on Germany on August 4, 1914. Australians would have reached Egypt after this.
Which group of people today are often photographed taking camel rides in Egypt? Tourists

Have students state a hypothesis.

What do you think is happening in this picture? Take some student answers.

Tell actual story and compare student answers.

Now I’m going to tell you what is known about this photograph. This photograph was taken in Egypt in 1914. It shows soldiers from the Australian 9th Battalion enjoying a camel ride, just like tourists to Egypt do today. After Britain declared war, it called on other countries in the British Empire to assist. Australia answered the call and sent troops. As these troops boarded ships they believed they were heading to Europe, but England was overcrowded and not equipped to accept such an influx of troops. And the European winter was coming – Australians would have found this challenging. So it was decided that ANZACs would base themselves in Egypt for further training and to protect British interests in this part of the world against the Ottoman Empire (Turkey), which had just entered the war. The Australians, like these men here, were excited. Most had never been to Egypt before and most would never have had the opportunity to visit had it not been for their war service. To begin with they acted more like tourists than soldiers, exploring Cairo and the Sphinx, as you can see by the soldiers walking all over it. Sadly this was the last holiday ever for many of these troops, as most were moved from here to Gallipoli where many died fighting the Ottoman Empire.

So was your hypothesis correct? What did you get right and what did you get wrong?

Compare what is the same and what is different from this story and their hypothesis.

There are many photos on this wall which shows soldiers enjoying their time and acting like tourists in Egypt and in other parts of the world they visited, as part of their war service. You might like to choose one of these photographs to analyse later. Let’s move onto our next photograph.

Photograph 2

Point students to this photograph.

Have a look at this photograph.

Recruiting train at Wallumbilla Railway Station ca. 1915 

Analysis questions

Where was this photo taken? In Australia at a railway station
How can you tell? Flags, trees, tracks and trains etc
Who is in the photograph? Men, women and children of all ages
What are they doing? Possibly waving the train off or greeting it.
What does this suggest about the train? That it was important or the people on it were important
Read the text below the photograph, what does it say?
Recruiting train at Wallumbilla Railway Station, 1915
Is there anything else you notice about this photograph which might help us work out what is happening in it?

 

Now you have gathered information through answering questions, I want you to think about what else you have learnt today that could provide you with some clues as to what is happening in this photograph. Think about these questions.
What does recruiting mean and what was happening in 1915 to make this needed?
Who do you think might be on the train?

Have students state a hypothesis

What do you think is happening in this picture? Take some student answers

Tell actual story and compare student answers.

This is a recruiting train. Initially, when the war broke out, special recruiting agencies or recruitment methods such as this train were not needed because enlistment numbers were high. But a year into the war, enlistment numbers were falling and the government looked for ways to get the recruitment message out. In a world before social media and before forms of communication such as television were developed, the message had to be delivered straight to the people. Train travel at the time was the most popular form of long distance travel over land, so trains became an obvious choice for moving the recruiting message throughout the state. On the trains were speakers, who at each stop would give stirring lectures detailing why it was important to enlist. As well as speakers, the trains carried medical officers to check the fitness of candidates and recruiting officers to sign them up.

Recruiting trains were just one of the methods used to recruit young men during the First World War. As well as traditional means such as media posters and rallies, Queensland also held a ‘snow ball’ recruiting march. This march was called the march of the Dungarees. It left Warwick in November 1915 and marched to Brisbane, recruiting men at the small towns they passed through.

So was your hypothesis correct? What did you get right and what did you get wrong?

Compare what is the same and what is different from this story and their hypothesis.

There are other photos on this wall of the different recruiting methods used during the First World War, including rallies, trains and marches. You might like to analyse one of these photographs later.

Photograph 3

Point students to this photograph.

Have a look at this photograph.

Behind the trenches at Anzac 1915

Analysis Questions

Where was this photo taken? Somewhere dry, possibly a beach
Is the land in the background flat or steep? Steep, possibly a hill
Who is in the photograph? Soldiers, Australian soldiers judging by the hats, possibly soldiers of higher rank
What are they doing? Sitting on a rough bench outside a small roughly built room of some sort
What can you tell me about the structure behind them? There are many sandbags piled on top of one another. These sandbags seem to form the wall of the structure. The roof is made out of galvanised iron with more sandbags on top to hold it down. There are curtains hanging in the doorway.
Judging by the way it has been built, do you think this structure is temporary or permanent? Temporary

Do you think it would have been comfortable?
Read the text below the photograph, what does it say?
Brigade Headquarters, Behind the Trenches at ANZAC, 1915
Is there anything else you notice about this photograph which might help us work out what is happening in it?

Now you have gathered information through answering questions, I want you to think about what else you have learnt today that could provide you with some clues as to what is happening in this photograph. Think about these questions.

What place is called ANZAC? ANZAC Cove Gallipoli, the beach where Australian and New Zealand soldiers landed during the Gallipoli campaign.
What do you know about the topography (landscape) of Gallipoli? Steep hills rising from the beach

Have students state a hypothesis

What do you think is happening in this picture? Take some student answers

Tell actual story and compare student answers

This is a photograph of a brigade headquarters at ANZAC Cove in Gallipoli. While the soldiers fought in trenches dug across the steep hill sides, the battles were controlled and co-ordinated from headquarters such as these, which were positioned on the beaches behind the front line. Other control points were positioned on patrol ships floating off shore out of the range of enemy fire.

Messages were relayed between the soldiers on the front line and those positioned on the beach by either radio, but more often than not, by runners. Soldiers were elected to run scribbled messages up and down the steep hill sides. The runners needed to be fit, quick and have a keen eye as they often had to avoid enemy snipers. The snipers were generally one soldier whose hiding position allowed him to see the enemy, but which made it difficult for the enemy to see them. The snipers job was to kill anyone they saw moving, including runners.

Those controlling the battles from headquarters near the front such as this one shown, roughed it almost as much as the soldiers in the trenches. This building would have leaked in the rain, would have been cold in the winter and hot in the summer. Those controlling the battles from ships stationed out to sea, were housed in much more comfortable surroundings and slept in real beds and ate proper meals at proper tables.

This temporary building was quickly erected and would have had a dirt floor. It would probably have housed a table covered in maps, a kerosene lantern to read by, chairs and possibly a rough bed for the commanding officer to sleep in.

So was your hypothesis correct? What did you get right and what did you get wrong?

Compare what is the same and what is different from this story and their hypothesis.

There are other photos on this wall of soldiers on the front line including soldiers fighting in France and in the Middle East. When you have some free time later, look for these photographs and think about the different conditions these soldiers faced and how difficult it would have been to access things we take for granted, such as water.

Photograph 4

Point students to this photograph.

 

Have a look at this photograph.

Marching band participates in the Peace Day procession in Brisbane 1919 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis questions

Where was this photo taken? Brisbane.
Why do you think this? There are a large number of large buildings and a lot of people on the street. You can also see the tram line running along the middle of the street, which capital cities had in those days. It was probably somewhere warm because some people are carrying umbrellas for shade.
Who is in the photograph? Boat float, horse and buggy, cars with flags, people on balconies and on the street, a banner.
What is happening? Street parade
Read the text below, what does it say?
HMS Vindictive Float on Peace Celebration Day, Brisbane, 1918
Is there anything else you notice about this photograph which might help us work out what is happening in it?

Now you have gathered information through answering questions, I want you to think about what else you have learnt today that could provide you with some clues as to what is happening in this photograph. Think about these questions.

When did the First World War finish? November 11, 1918
How did Queensland react to the news? With jubilation

Have students state a hypothesis

What do you think is happening in this picture? Take some student answers.

Tell actual story and compare student answers

This is one of the floats that formed part of the procession for Peace Day Celebrations, held in Brisbane on the 29th November 1918, to celebrate the end of the First World War.

Queensland first received word that the war had ended early in the evening of Monday 11 November 1918, a day we now call Armistice Day. The good news spread like wildfire and within hours people started pouring into the street. It was a noisy, joyous evening with church bells ringing, people blowing whistles and the voices of Brisbane residents singing patriotic songs were heard well into the next morning. That night Brisbane and Queensland didn’t sleep, as scenes such as those seen in Brisbane were mimicked around the country.

Celebrations continued the next day. People piled onto suburban trains and tram cars to travel into the city to participate in the joyous occasion. The noise was deafening. Cars decorated with flags tooted their horns, bugles were played, tin-can bands marched up and down the streets and the noise of whistles and singing grew even louder. Fireworks got bigger, and in some cases even caused minor injuries. Everybody had a flag or a ribbon and waved it patriotically. People were encouraged to gather at the Exhibition Grounds where the celebrations continued. Over 60,000 people crowed the ring and the grandstands. They listened to speeches, applauded returned soldiers and partied like they’d never partied before.

After this initial jubilation, an official procession to celebrate the end of the war was organised for the 29th November 1918. The Peace Day Parade, also called the Armistice Day Parade, was attended by thousands of people who lined the streets and stood in balconies cheering the parade as it went past. The parade was filled with floats such as this one. Some proclaimed messages of peace while others displayed messages of hope for the future.

So was your hypothesis correct? What did you get right and what did you get wrong?

Compare what is the same and what is different from this story and their hypothesis.

There are other photos on this wall of Queenslanders celebrating the end of the war. You may like to choose one of them to analyse later.

Photograph 5

Point students to this photograph

Have a look at this photograph.

Wreath laying ceremony on Anzac Day at the Manly Triangle Brisbane 1922

 

Analysis questions

Where was this photo taken? Possibly a park
Who is in the photograph? Men, women and children
How are they dressed? Formally
What are they doing? Standing next to a memorial
What objects and items can you see in the photograph? Memorial with name plaque, wreaths, fence behind
How do you know it is a war memorial? Soldier on top, by the design
Read the text below, what does it say?
Wreath Laying Ceremony on ANZAC Day, at the Manly Triangle, Brisbane, 1922
Is there anything else you notice about this photograph which might help us work out what is happening in it?

Now you have gathered information through answering these questions, I want you to think about what else you have learnt today that could provide you with some clues as to what is happening in this photograph. Think about this question.
How quickly after the landings of Gallipoli did ANZAC Day type services commence? That same year.

Have students state a hypothesis.

What do you think is happening in this picture? Take some student answers

Tell actual story and compare student answers

This photograph was taken on the 25 April 1922 at a wreath laying ceremony in Manly. This was typical of the types of commemoration events that were happening at that time.

Unofficial ANZAC Day type events were actually being held in Queensland as soon as late 1915, shortly after the Gallipoli landings. In January 1916 a formal ANZAC Day committee was formed in Brisbane, to explore ways to publicly commemorate the almost 8,000 soldiers who had died in the failed campaign. It consisted mainly of politicians but also of some clergy men. This committee promoted the idea of ANZAC Day not only in Queensland but Australia wide. On the 25 April 1916, one year to the day that Australian troops splashed ashore at the Gallipoli Peninsula, 6,434 servicemen paraded through the streets of Brisbane before 50,000 onlookers. This was the first instance of what would soon become an annual national ritual of observance – Anzac Day. The origin of Anzac Day is a uniquely Queensland story. The committee comprised leading establishment figures, including the Premier T.J. Ryan, The Minister for Education, The Lord Mayor of Brisbane, and Canon David John Garland, an active member of the Queensland Recruiting Committee, who was appointed secretary. While the original intention of the Anzac Day committee was to honour those who fell in Australia’s first major military engagement of the First World War, subsequent events soon broadened its scope and meaning, eventually culminating in the current Anzac Day commemorations with which most Queenslanders are familiar.

After the war, honour boards and monuments sprang up all over Queensland. They served two main purposes. One was as a place where people could go, to remember and mourn family and friends. The second was as the central point for ANZAC Day services.

Until 1930, ANZAC Day was not a public holiday and if it fell during the week, only those whose employers gave them time off, could attend. This included returned soldiers. In 1930 it became the public holiday we know today, but unlike other public holidays, it is one where we remember and honour the men and women who died fighting for Australia and the sacrifices and hardships endured by all Queenslanders during and after the war.

So was your hypothesis correct? What did you get right and what did you get wrong?

Compare what is the same and what is different from this story and their hypothesis.

There are other photos on this wall of Queenslanders commemorating the war. You may like to choose one of them to analyse later.

Students complete their own picture analysis in groups

Now that we have finished analysing photographs as a class, you are going to break into groups and do the same thing. Here is how it is going to work.

In a minute I’m going to break you into groups of 4.

I’m then going to give each group one of these sheets. (Show analysis sheets.) This sheet has a series of questions on it, much like the questions we’ve just considered.

As a group you will then choose a photograph on this wall that interests you.

Once you have found your photograph you’re job is to answer the questions on this sheet, by looking for answers in the photograph….just like we have just done as a whole group.

Discuss analysis sheet with students

Once students are clear on what they have to do, break them into groups, hand out activity sheets and let them complete the activity.

Once you have finished, ask students to take analysis sheets with them.

*Students may wish to look up the photos they are analysing once back at school and then write a narrative about it.

Library membership

Become an SLQ member now to access our services, collections and facilities.

Library Shop online

Discover an eclectic range of books, gifts, reproduction prints and more at the Library Shop.