Patrick O'Sullivan

Pat O'Sullivan, convict Queenslander

(Landowner and member of Parliament)

"Practically ever since Ipswich has been Ipswich the name of Mr. Patrick O'Sullivan has been identified with the progress of the district, and as one of its original legislators he did much for the advancement of Queensland." - Queensland Times, 1 March 1904, p.10

Born: 14 March 1818 at Castlemaine, Ireland
Convicted: 2 January 1838, Kent Quarter Sessions
Sentence: 15 years transportation
Ship: Bengal Merchant
Transported: Arrived in New South Wales 21 July 1838
Died: 29 February 1904 in Woodend, Ipswich
Notes: Ticket-of-leave on 20 February 1845
Conditional pardon on 20 October 1849

"Queensland owes a lot to these "men of the old colonial school," who blazed the track of civilisation, and made ready the way for generations to follow." - Queensland Times, 1 March 1904, p.4

Further reading:

Obituary 1 | Obituary 2 | Obituary 3

Queensland Times obituary for Patrick O'Sullivan, convict Queenslander

Transcribed from the newspaper Queensland Times, 1 March 1904, p.10The Queensland Times newspaper

Death of Mr. Patrick O'Sullivan - A Very Old Resident

One of the oldest of the pioneers of Ipswich died at his residence, Woodend, yesterday morning.  Practically ever since Ipswich has been Ipswich the name of Mr. Patrick O'Sullivan has been identified with the progress of the district, and as one of its original legislators he did much for the advancement of Queensland.  Though a very old man, it is only during comparatively recent years that he has retired from public affairs.  Mr. O'Sullivan was born in Kerry, Ireland, on the 14th of March, 1818, so it will be seen that he was nearly 86 years of age.  In his younger days he was a soldier, and was present with his regiment at the coronation of the late Queen Victoria.  After his arrival in Queensland he came to Ipswich in 1848, and his home has been here ever since.  At that time he commenced business as a storekeeper, and, later on, invested in property.  "O'Sullivan's buildings" in Brisbane street and O'Sullivan's residence at Woodend are prominent landmarks.  He was married in 1851.  When separation was accomplished, Mr. O'Sullivan was returned with the late Hon. A. Macalister (afterwards Premier) and the late Mr. F. A. Forbes, to represent the constituency of West Moreton in the first Parliament of Queensland.  His political career was a long and useful one.  He was a warm advocate of the interests of the farmer, and in the early days of the history of this State fought hard, both in and out of Parliament, for the principal of free selection before survey.  Again in 1867 he stood for West Moreton, and was returned, his colleagues on that occasion being Sir J. P. Bell and the Hon. George Thorn.  His next constituency was Burke, for which he was elected in 1875.  In 1880 he stood for Stanley and was returned.  Again in 1889 — though having then attained the allotted age of man — the Stanley electors reposed their confidence in him as their representative.  Five years later he retired from the political arena.  His career as a legislator was characterised by a thoroughness and honesty of purpose which accorded well with his vigorous personality.  Politics were not, however, his sole care.  He interested himself in the general advancement of the town and the colony at large, and always took a keen interest in sporting matters, having frequently officiated as judge at the Christmas races of the North Australian Jockey Club, when the old Grange racecourse was the headquarters of the turf fraternity.  A prominent part of the establishment of the Ipswich hospital was played by him.  He built the Ulster hotel many years ago.  And last, but not least, the members of his family have grown up and made honorable positions for themselves.  For the past 10 or 11 years Mr. O'Sullivan has been living a retired life in Ipswich.  Last Saturday he had a stroke which deprived him of consciousness, and he never rallied, passing away peacefully yesterday morning.

Mr. O'Sullivan leaves a widow and eight of a family surviving him.  These are — The Hon. T. O'Sullivan, M.L.C., barrister-at-law, of Brisbane; Mr. P. A. O'Sullivan, senior member of the firm of O'Sullivan and Scott, solicitors of Brisbane; Mr. M. J. O'Sullivan, solicitor of Toowoomba; Mr. J. J. O'Sullivan of the Railway Department ; Mr. Frank O'Sullivan, who is connected with the police department in South Africa; Mrs. J. J. McGee, of Toowoomba; Mrs. Guy Dutton, of South Africa; and Miss Kate O'Sullivan, who is living with her mother at Woodend, besides 21 grandchildren. The funeral is to leave for the cemetery at 11.30 o'clock this morning.

As a token of respect to the deceased gentleman the flag at the Town Hall yesterday was flying at half-mast.

Disclaimer: This has been transcribed directly from the original document. Any mistakes are from the original document.

Queensland Times obituary for Patrick O'Sullivan, convict Queenslander

Transcribed from the newspaper Queensland Times, 1 March 1904, p.4The Queensland Times newspaper

The Passing of a Pioneer

The death of a veteran Mr. P. O'Sullivan, recorded in our columns today, removes from the earthly scene one of the oldest and most vigorous of Queensland pioneers.  Mention of his name easily recalls those of such prominent men as the late Sir Joshua Peter Bell, A. Macalister, R. J. Smith, Colonel Gray, R. G. W. Herbert (still alive in England and lately made a member of the Right Hon. J. Chamberlain's Tariff Commission), Ratcliffe Pring, Major North, William Vowles, George Faircloth, Pollett Cardew, J. Panton, J. Murphy, C. Gerry, M. O'Malley (still in the flesh), C. L. D. Fattorini, and many other of the early day settlers.  Mr. O'Sullivan was a member of the first Queensland Parliament, and it is interesting to note that his fellow-legislators on that occasion were - Messers. A. Macalister, F. A. Forbes, G. Thorn, A. D. Broughton, G. Raff, Rev. Dr. Nelson, H. Jordan, W. C. Blakeney, Henry Richards, Charles Lilley, John Watts (the gentleman who is reputed to said that the Darling Downs could not grow a cabbage), James Taylor, Thomas De Lacy Moffatt, R. Pring, St. George R. Gore, R. G. W. Herbert, C. J. Royds, G. Edmondstone, H. Buckley, C. Coxen, J. Ferrett, Gilbert Elliott (the first Speaker), C. Fitzsimmons, and Sir R. W. Mackenzie.  Queensland owes a lot to these "men of the old colonial school," who blazed the track of civilisation, and made ready the way for generations to follow.  Among them the late Mr. O'Sullivan was known always for his bluff and hearty ways.  He was a diplomatist of the old school who went straight to the point at issue without any circumlocution or finesse.  On one occasion, when a Dentistry Bill was being considered in the Legislative Assembly, he convulsed the House by saying that all the tooth pulling that ever he had required he had done by means of a piece of string.  That was characteristic of the man.  Like the Barmecides he lived in the days "when hearts could glow", and when men settled their affairs with more directness and dispatch than they do nowadays.  As politician, sportsman, and citizen he took part in the strenuous life of pioneer colonisation, and for him and many of his contemporaries a green place should be kept in the memory of the present day generation.

Disclaimer: This has been transcribed directly from the original document.  Any mistakes are from the original document.

The Age (Brisbane) obituary for Patrick O'Sullivan, convict Queenslander

Transcribed from the newspaper The Age (Brisbane), 5 March 1904, p.7The Age - banner

Obituary - Mr. Patrick O'Sullivan.

One of the oldest of the pioneers of Ipswich died at his residence, Woodend, Ipswich on Monday morning.  Practically ever since Ipswich has been Ipswich, the name of Mr. Patrick O'Sullivan has been identified with the progress of the district, and as one of the original legislators he did much for the advancement of Queensland.  Though a very old man, it is only during comparatively recent years that he has retired from public affairs.  Mr. O'Sullivan was born in Kerry, Ireland, on the 14th March, 1818, so it will be seen that he was nearly 86 years of age. He arrived in Ipswich in 1848, and his home has been there ever since.  At that time he commenced business as a storekeeper, and, later on, invested in property.  When separation was accomplished Mr. O'Sullivan was returned with the late Hon. A. Macalister (afterwards Premier) and the late Mr. F. A. Forbes to represent the constituency of West Moreton in the first Parliament of Queensland.  His political career was a long and useful one.  He was a warm advocate of the interests of the farmer, and in the earlier days of the history of this State fought hard, both in and out of Parliament, for the principle of free selection before survey.  Again in 1867 he stood for West Moreton, and was returned, his colleagues on that occasion being Sir J. P. Bell and the Hon. George Thorn.  His next constituency was Burke, for which he was elected in 1875.  In 1880 he stood for Stanley, and was returned.  Again in 1888 — though having then attained the allotted age of man - the Stanley electors reposed their confidence in him as their representative.  Five years later he retired from the political arena.  His career as a legislator was characterised by a thoroughness and honesty of purpose which accorded well with his vigorous personality.  Politics were not, however, his sole care.  He interested himself in the general advancement of the town and the colony at large, and always took a keen interest in sporting matters.  For the last 10 or 11 years Mr. O'Sullivan has been living a retired life in Ipswich.  Last Saturday he had a stroke which deprived him of consciousness, and he never rallied, passing away peacefully on Monday morning.

Mr. O'Sullivan leaves a widow and eight of a family surviving him.  These are – the Hon. T. O'Sullivan, M.L.C., barrister-at-law, of Brisbane; Mr. P. A. O'Sullivan, senior member of the firm of O'Sullivan and Scott, solicitor of Brisbane; Mr. M. J. O'Sullivan, solicitor of Toowoomba; Mr. J. J. O'Sullivan, of the Railway Department; Mr. Frank O'Sullivan, who is connected with the Police Department in South Africa; Mrs. J. J. McGee, of Toowoomba; Mrs. Guy Dutton, of South Africa; and Miss Kate O'Sullivan, who is living with her mother at Woodend, besides 21 grandchildren.

The funeral of the deceased gentleman took place on Tuesday morning, the cortege leaving the deceased's late residence at Woodend at 11.30 o'clock.  There was a very large attendance, among those present being Sir H. M. Nelson (President of the Legislative Council), Hon. J. T. Bell (Minister for Lands), Hon. J. W. Blair (Attorney-General), Mr. Justice Real, and Messers. E. J. Pender, J. McGrath, G. W. Power, M. O'Malley, sen., J. McGroarty, F. X. Heeney, W. H. Kellett, D. T. Keogh, S. Watson, D. Shine, J. J. Johnstone, and Alderman M. Real.  A large number of wreaths were sent by sympathizing friends.  The Rev. J. Duhig officiated, at the graveside. – R.I.P.

Disclaimer: This has been transcribed directly from the original document.  Any mistakes are from the original document.

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