Edward Mott

Edward Mott

(Well-known resident of Enoggera)

"A large concourse of mourners followed his remains to their last resting-place, the gathering included representatives of nearly all the families in the district, and numerous busy city men, who made the time necessary to pay their respects to the old pioneer." - The Queenslander, 8 September 1900, p.542 and 543

Born: c.1807
Convicted: 18 January 1828 at Gloucester City Assizes
Crime: Stealing [a] gun
Sentence: 7 years transportation
Ship: Countess of Harcourt
Transported: Arrived in New South Wales on 8 September 1828
Died: 1 September 1900. Originally buried at St Matthew's Church in Grovely, but later moved to Toowong Cemetery in 1939
Notes: Sent to Moreton Bay in June 1832
Ticket-of-leave issued on 9 February 1844

Further documents

Queenslander obituary for Edward Mott, convict Queenslander

Transcribed from the newspaper 'The Queenslander,' 8 September 1900, pp.542-543.The Queenslander newspaper

DEATH OF AN OLD COLONIST

Perhaps the oldest colonist in Queensland was Mr. Edward Mott, who passed away quietly in the presence of those he most loved last week. He was a man who was not often seen; he lived in his bush home at Enoggera, and during recent years at all events came into town very seldom. The deceased gentleman was born at the beginning of the now dying century – in 1807 – and came to New South Wales as far back at 1826. After a residence there of some fourteen years, he travelled overland to what had only a few years before been christened Moreton Bay, but now the capital of Queensland. Since then he has never left the place. The old gentleman was always interesting, for he had a fund of information and a wealth of incident to impart, which made conversation with him engrossing. He was the only man who has seen Brisbane grow from its inception, and it is fortunate that some of his experiences, his trials, and his troubles – which were typical of other pioneers even later than himself – have been preserved to us by means of Mr. J. J. Knight's work, "In the Early Days." His experiences, however, were not confined to the dim and distant past; only a few years ago an attempt was made on his life, for he was waylaid and almost strangled. The marks he bore with him to his grave. After this he decided to make a disposition of his property for he was always a careful man, At the time of his death he was in very comfortable circumstances, but what he prized most was the esteem in which he was held by a large circle of friends. The old gentleman was buried on Wednesday in Grovely Cemetery, close to the home in which he had lived for some forty-five years. A large concourse of mourners followed his remains to their last resting-place, the gathering included representatives of nearly all the families in the district, and numerous busy city men, who made the time necessary to pay their respects to the old pioneer. Four daughters survive Mr. Mott – Mrs. A Clugston, Mrs. T. Herraty, Mrs. George Marshall, and Mrs. William Page, all of Enoggera. The deceased's age was 93 years and three days.

Disclaimer: This has been transcribed directly from the original document. Any mistakes are from the original document.

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