Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

23 Nov 2015

Join the puppet party at State Library these holidays

Join the puppet party at State Library these holidays

Little people with big things to share are invited to State Library of Queensland (SLQ) these school holidays, where every child can be an artist, author, storyteller and performer.

From 4 January 2016, SLQ’s summer holiday program will present puppet workshops, interactive performances and art making activities celebrating the ideas and imaginations of the smallest members of the community.

Acting State Librarian Sonia Cooper said each year SLQ’s holiday program sees thousands of families join its exciting array of fun and affordable activities.

“This summer holidays State Library will come alive with activities and workshops that engage and inspire young minds and provide creative learning experiences for the whole family to enjoy,” Mrs Cooper said.

“This is a great opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children in a fun, family-friendly environment, and we welcome everyone to take part,” she said.

Parents and children can craft their own puppet characters and learn tips and tricks to make them come to life at the puppet-arium workshop (for all ages, bookings required); or drop by the puppet paper town (for all ages) to craft and play with your puppet characters, and have your photo taken in the puppet portrait studio.

Even more puppet friends will be popping up throughout the library, encouraging visitors to join them for singing, stories and a bit of serious silliness.

Pack your pram, pull up a pillow and enjoy the Family film fest (for all ages) where children are at the centre of the adventure; and don’t miss the APDL Little Designers pattern and placemaking workshops (for ages 4–8, bookings required), which will introduce young minds to design, architecture and placemaking through play.

Plus, Story Lab workshops (for ages 8–16, bookings required) are back for another jam-packed program of hands-on, minds-on fun and creativity. Choose from workshops in robotics, animation, manga, blogging, zines, cartooning and more.

Bookings are required for some workshops. For more information and to book, visit slq.qld.gov.au

Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
T 07 3840 7784 | E stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

19 Nov 2015

Peace and Quiet at the library

Peace and Quiet at the library

Explore personal, social and political ideas of peace at Peace and Quiet, State Library of Queensland’s next exhibition, opening Saturday 28 November.

Peace and Quiet is a community exhibition, led by artists Elizabeth Woods and Kevin Leong, that collects the thoughts and gestures of contemporary Queenslanders at peacetime, against the backdrop of growing global political conflict.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said the exhibition had been created in collaboration with the community, with the project striking a chord with people from all walks of life.

“There has been a great deal of interest and enthusiasm from the community, with many people contributing ideas and artwork to this exhibition,” Ms Enoch said.
 
“The wonderful part of this approach is that it allows the Library to create a genuine exhibition that documents and shares the story of Queenslanders.”

Acting State Librarian and CEO Sonia Cooper said Peace and Quiet will be an engaging exhibition and events program, that examines the diverse ideas and desires that underpin different perceptions of peace.

“Community members have shared their vision of a peaceful world by contributing peaceful landscape artworks that will be mounted over the First World War wallpaper in SLQ Gallery, providing a powerful reminder of what is lost in times of war,” Mrs Cooper said.

“State Library has also worked with individuals who have first-hand experiences of wartime, to capture perspectives of peace from people who have experienced its absence.”
 
Visitors to the exhibition will be able to immerse themselves in the handiwork of Queensland communities, with handmade national flags created in white, and a collection of early and current placards from the peace movement.

Videos will showcase community performances, and visitors will be able to share their own vision of peace by participating in activities and workshops, including making peace decorations in time for Christmas, creating wearable expressions of peace, and crafting Valentine’s gifts of peace and love.

Peace and Quiet is at State Library of Queensland from 28 November 2015 to 14 February 2016. For full program details see qanzac100.slq.qld.gov.au/events/peace-and-quiet 
 
Peace and Quiet, as part of State Library’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
T 07 3840 7784 | E stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

Interviews and images available upon request.

Media op:     Exclusive media walk-through

Join exhibition curator Kevin Wilson, and artists Elizabeth Woods and Kevin Leong, for an exclusive media preview of Peace and Quiet.
Be among the first to see this exhibition, hear about the curation process, and speak directly to community contributors about their work and why they got involved.

Date:        Thursday 26 November, 2015
Time:        10am
Location:  Meet at the Welcome Desk, level 1, State Library of Queensland Cultural Precinct, Stanley Place, South Brisbane
RSVP:    by Wednesday 25 November to Stephanie Birch  or phone 07 3840 7784.

13 Nov 2015

Indigenous artists with disability showcase their strong hearts

Indigenous artists with disability showcase their strong hearts

Indigenous artists living with disability will tell their personal stories of strength through creative pieces of art on canvas, wheelchairs, wheelie-walkers and a canoe.

The Walan Giiny (strong heart) exhibition, which opened at State Library’s kuril dhagun this weekend, is a creative outlet for the Nandjimadji artists from the Sunshine Coast.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said the Nandjimadji group helped Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to maintain connection with culture and community.

“The Walan Giiny exhibition highlights the important contribution that these artists make to community and culture,” she said.

“The Nandjimadji group has members from teenagers to Elders aged 75 years and they come from many different backgrounds and language groups, with a variety of individual disabilities. Walan Giiny is another step to bridge the gap between modern concepts of disability and the traditions of the world’s oldest, continuous living culture.”

Acting State Librarian Sonia Cooper said Walan Giiny meant ‘strong heart’ and this was evident in each unique piece of art curated for the exhibition.

“The works demonstrate how art plays an integral role both in the healing process for community members with disability, and in the traditional storytelling methods in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.”

The entrance to the exhibition is heralded by an eye-catching, hand-painted, six-metre-long outrigger canoe which is used by the Nandjimadji group and taken out on the water for special occasions.

The exhibition is part of the kuril dhagun community exhibition program. Artists are selected through an Expression of Interest process and receive development and co-curation support for their exhibition.

Walan Giiny (strong heart) is on display in kuril dhagun on level 1 of State Library of Queensland, South Bank until 21 February 2016.

Background — Nandjimadji

The word ‘Nandjimadji’ is drawn from the Gubbi Gubbi language local to the Sunshine Coast region and means to ‘lighten the load’ or ‘make something less heavy’.

Nandjimadji aims to address the prevalent issues of social isolation and lack of access to culturally respectful services and support.

The Nandjimadji art group is sponsored by Suncare. Walan Giiny is presented as part of a partnership between Suncare, First Peoples Disability Network and Synapse.

Interview opportunities
Jennifer Cullen
CEO, Synapse
Representative of the Nandjimadji art group

Elisa Carmichael
Community Exhibition Officer, kuril dhagun, State Library of Queensland

High resolution images available upon request.

Media enquiries: Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
3842 9084 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

28 Oct 2015

Community day to contribute to a future of peace and quiet

Community day to contribute to a future of peace and quiet

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) invites you to make war a distant memory in an afternoon of activism from 2pm–7pm on Saturday 7 November.

Enjoy free live music, poetry, talks and hands-on activities as we dream, listen to and create our hopes for peace during the final days of the Distant Lines: Queensland voices of the First World War exhibition.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch encouraged the community to attend the action-packed day which also provided the public an opportunity to contribute to SLQ’s next exhibition Peace and Quiet.

“This is an opportunity to create a collaborative piece of art for the next exciting exhibition which is part of the Anzac centenary commemorations,” Ms Enoch said.

“It is a great opportunity for everyone to have a hand in an exhibition that documents and shares the story of Queenslanders.”

Acting State Librarian Sonia Cooper said the community day will give visitors a final chance to explore Distant Lines.

“We have been delighted with the community’s response to Distant Lines with more than 34,000 visitors enjoying the exhibition since April. The community day transitions us into the next phase of our Q ANZAC 100 activities where we explore the notion of peace,” Ms Cooper said.

Hear from an eclectic troop of artists, academics and political activists on the topics of peace and protest — sung, spoken and shouted at the world.

The music program will kick off with fearlessly independent and genre defying Hussy Hicks, followed by award winning hip hop artist and killer music director Busty Beatz, and conclude with the talented Peter Hunt and members of Kooii.

Don’t miss Brisbane Free University pop-up talks and a panel discussion which will explore critical political issues.

David Stavanger aka ‘Ghostboy’ — the Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde of Australian Poetry — will host a topical poetry program featuring a variety of Brisbane poets throughout the day.

Get hands on and share your vision of a peaceful world with art for peace workshops allowing you to create your own peace landscape and try your hand at screen-printing, and badge and placard making.

Take part in performances designed to provoke thought and celebrate peace through the semaphores project and watch a series of surprising flash mob dances inspired by the love generation in collaboration with Ausdance.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for a full program of events or follow the conversation online with @slqld #distantlines #qanzac100 and #ww1.

This event is part of State Library’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Media enquiries

Cinnamon Watson Publicity | 0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

 

 

9 Oct 2015

Premier names winners of 2015 Queensland Literary Awards

Premier names winners of 2015 Queensland Literary Awards

Premier and Arts Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk has announced the winners of new literary awards supported by the Queensland Government at tonight’s presentation at State Library of Queensland. 

“This year my government reinstated support for the Queensland Literary Awards, matching the sponsorship and funding of ten awards and establishing new awards,” the Premier said. 

“Tonight we see the results of that decision – the celebration of talented voices telling Queensland stories. 

“The winner of the $25 000 Queensland Premier’s Award for a Work of State Significance is Warrior, by Libby Connors, for the dramatic story of young Aboriginal leader Dundalli and his life on the colonial frontier set against a portrait of early Brisbane. 

“This award recognises writing with a Queensland focus, celebrating important Queensland authors, stories, history and voices and the judges’ decision to award Warrior was unanimous,” Ms Palaszczuk said. 

The winners of the two Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards for writers aged 18-30, each to the value of $12 500, are Megan McGrath, who was raised on North Stradbroke Island and Toowoomba-based Rebecca Jessen. 

The prize includes career development support from Queensland Writers Centre, to help foster the next generation of Queensland writers. 

The three $20,000 Queensland Writers’ Fellowships go to Sunshine Coast-based Inga Simpson, Brisbane writer Krissy Kneen and Karen Foxlee, who lives in Gympie.

“These writers will use their fellowships to develop a manuscript or writing project towards publication by the end of 2016,” the Premier said.

The Premier applauded the QLA organisers, sponsors and publishers who kept the awards alive when the previous governments stripped funding.

“Congratulations to all involved for refusing to let Queensland voices be silenced, for maintaining a fine tradition of recognising our literary talent,” she said. 

In 2015, the Queensland Literary Awards, administered by State Library of Queensland, awarded writers in twelve categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry, including The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award. 

The Queensland Literary Awards are supported through the Queensland Government, the University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, Claire Booth, the Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail. 

For a complete list of winners see www.qldliteraryawards.org.au.

Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson | Cinnamon Watson Publicity | 0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

Photos available upon request.

28 Sep 2015

How should we remember Queensland’s First World War history?

How should we remember Queensland’s First World War history?

Join leading historical thinkers to discuss and debate the role of the Anzac legend at State Library of Queensland’s upcoming symposium, How we remember.

How we remember: responding to 100 years since the First World War is a free, interactive forum that will encourage participants to rethink our understanding of Queensland’s First World War history.

Commencing with a welcome function and keynote address on the evening prior, the full day symposium on Wednesday 14 October will feature individual presentations and panel discussions from academics, writers, journalists, curators and musicians.

Guest presenters, such as Adjunct Associate Professor, author, and former Australian army officer James Brown and historian and author Dr Carolyn Holbrook, will each share their unique perspectives on memory, myth-making, the historical reality of the war, the notion of the sacred, and how these relate to Australia’s remembrance of the First World War.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said it was also important to consider how these ideas impact on future generations of Queenslanders.

“The history and memory of the Anzac legend has evolved over time and each community will respond in their own unique way to this, with their own unique stories,” Ms Enoch said.

“By understanding the value that the Anzac legend holds for different communities, we can begin to answer the question of how we can inclusively commemorate, communicate and remember these First World War stories.”

State Librarian Janette Wright said that this centenary year of the Gallipoli landing was a timely moment to re-examine our nation’s understanding of remembrance and commemoration.

“The Anzac legend has come to occupy an immense space in our national psyche, with the prolific re-telling of the story of Gallipoli as ‘the birth of a nation’,” Ms Wright said.

“Commemoration is seen by most Australians as a way to remember and honour the fallen, imbuing their memory with a sense of sacredness.”

How we remember will explore this narrative, as well as give voice to those who seek to highlight the populist nature of this history telling and advocate for a more historically accurate record. The symposium aims to share both sides of this contentious debate.”

For more information and to register for the free symposium, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

How we remember: responding to 100 years since the First World War is part of Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation, a five year legacy project led by State Library and proudly supported by the Queensland Government.


How we remember: responding to 100 years since the First World War
State Library of Queensland
Free, bookings required

Tue 13 Oct, 6pm–8pm
Keynote address and welcome function

Wed 14 Oct, 9am–3.30pm
Presentations and panel discussions, incl. morning tea and lunch

Interview opportunities:
Keynote speaker (Tue 13 Oct)
Adjunct Associate Professor James Brown, former Australian army officer and author of Anzac’s Long Shadow
Keynote speaker (Wed 14 Oct)
Dr Carolyn Holbrook, historian and author of Anzac: the unauthorised biography

Media enquiries:
Keziah Sydes, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9346 | keziah.sydes@slq.qld.gov.au

21 Sep 2015

Think Outside: Leading designers explore design and conflict

Think Outside: Leading designers explore design and conflict

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is asking leading designers to step outside their comfort zone and apply their way of thinking in new contexts.

Think Outside is a free annual talk series hosted by SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library, which invites local, national and international design thinkers to contemplate a problem outside their area of expertise, offering new and unexpected solutions for discussion.

This year’s series looks at the intersection between design and conflict, challenging panellists to consider how design might counteract the ongoing social, environmental and psychological impacts of conflict.

The series kicks-off on Wednesday 30 September, with panellists being asked: how might design employ acts of repair before, during and after conflict?

State Librarian Janette Wright said design thinking is a creative, future-focussed problem-solving process that matches needs with opportunities.

“Design thinking is becoming increasingly recognised as a powerful process for creatively exploring the challenges of the 21st century, beyond the traditional realm of designing products,” Ms Wright said.

“We’re curious to explore what happens when powerful minds are challenged to think outside their comfort zone and apply their way of thinking to the context of conflict in its many forms."

“By asking leading design thinkers these significant questions, we hope to ignite discussion that inspires new ideas and possibilities, leading to broader conversations and action on this issue,” she said.

Each speaker will have 15 minutes to be as provocative and evocative as they wish, setting the platform for a considered debate and discussion with the audience, around the practical implications of these new ideas.

2015 marks the third year of State Library’s Think Outside series, which has developed a strong track record of attracting outstanding panellists, and generating engaging and thought-provoking discussion.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for more details and to book tickets.

Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 | stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

11 Sep 2015

2015 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist announcement

2015 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist announcement

State Librarian Janette Wright today announced the shortlists for the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards (QLA), highlighting the incredible strength and diversity in Australian writing talent.

The QLA is a community driven awards program, managed by State Library of Queensland, which nurtures and celebrates the talent and achievement of Australian writers. This year 58 authors have been shortlisted across 12 categories.

In releasing the shortlists, Ms Wright said the continued support for the QLA from authors, sponsors, publishers and the literary community had been exceptional.

“From distinguished and highly celebrated authors such as Joan London and J.M. Coetzee, to talented debut authors like Ellen van Neerven, the Queensland Literary Awards continue to attract the highest calibre of literature across Australia,” Ms Wright said.

“The judges, across all categories, have had an extremely challenging task short listing from such a rich field of nominations and I thank them for their work."

“We are grateful for the continued support of key QLA partners including the University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, Claire Booth, the Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail,” she said.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said the QLA were an integral part of Australia’s literary scene.

“They are a true celebration of our stories: the stories of young Australians, our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, of urban and regional Australians,” Ms Enoch said.

In addition to the QLA, three Queensland Writers Fellowships will provide support for Queensland authors to develop their work for publication.

Readers have the power to pick the winner of the popular The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year category. Members of the public can vote online at qldliteraryawards.org.au until 18 September.

The award winners and fellowship recipients will be announced at a special awards ceremony to be held in October.

The shortlists can be found at qldliteraryawards.org.au

The 2015 Queensland Literary Award categories are:

  • Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance
  • University of Queensland Fiction Book Award
  • University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award
  • Griffith University Young Adult Book Award
  • Griffith University Children’s Book Award
  • University of Southern Queensland History Book Award
  • University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award
  • State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award
  • Unpublished Indigenous Writer - David Unaipon Award (supported by the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund and University of Queensland Press)
  • Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award (supported by University of Queensland Press)
  • Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards
  • The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book for the Year

Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson | Cinnamon Watson Publicity
0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

 

2015 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist

Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance
  • Heat and Light by Ellen van Neerven (University of Queensland Press)
  • Joe’s Fruit Shop and Milk Bar by Zoe Boccabella (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • Queensland; Everything you ever wanted to know, but were afraid to ask by Mark Bahnisch (NewSouth Publishing)
  • Through the Wall: Reflections on Leadership, Love and Survival by Anna Bligh (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • Warrior by Libby Connors (Allen & Unwin)
University of Queensland Fiction Book Award
  • A Short History of Richard Kline by Amanda Lohrey (Black Inc.)
  • The Golden Age by Joan London (Random House Australia)
  • The Snow Kimono by Mark Henshaw (Text Publishing)
  • The Wonder Lover by Malcolm Knox (Allen & Unwin)
  • To Name Those Lost by Rohan Wilson (Allen & Unwin)
University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award
  • Mannix by Brenda Niall (Text Publishing)
  • The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia by Don Watson (Penguin)
  • The Life of I: The New Culture of Narcissism by Anne Manne (Melbourne University Press)
  • The Wife Drought by Annabel Crabb (Random House Australia)
  • Thea Astley: Inventing Her Own Weather by Karen Lamb (University of Queensland Press)

Griffith University Young Adult Book Award
  • Are you Seeing Me? by Darren Groth (Random House Australia)
  • Razorhurst by Justine Larbalestier (Allen & Unwin)
  • The Minnow by Diana Sweeney (Text Publishing)
  • The Pause by John Larkin (Random House Australia)
  • Vanishing Point by Jeri Kroll (Puncher and Wattman)

Griffith University Children's Book Award
  • A Single Stone by Meg McKinlay (Walker Books Australia)
  • Figgy in the World by Tamsin Janu (Omnibus Books)
  • Lucky by David Mackintosh (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • New Boy by Nick Earls (Penguin)
  • Teacup by Rebecca Young & Matt Ottley (Scholastic Australia)

University of Southern Queensland History Book Award
  • ANZAC, The Unauthorised Biography by Carolyn Holbrook (NewSouth Publishing)
  • Settler Society in the Australian Colonies: Self-Government and Imperial Culture by Angela Woollacott (Oxford University Press)
  • The Invisible History of the Human Race by Christine Kenneally (Black Inc.)
  • Visiting the Neighbours: Australians in Asia by Agnieszka Sobocinska (NewSouth Publishing)
  • Warning: The Story of Cyclone Tracy by Sophie Cunningham (Text Publishing)

University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award
  • Arms Race and Other Stories by Nic Low (Text Publishing)
  • Bapo by Nick Jose (Giramondo)
  • Heat and Light by Ellen van Neerven (University of Queensland Press)
  • Merciless Gods by Christos Tsiolkas (Allen & Unwin)
  • Three Stories by J.M. Coetzee (Text Publishing)

State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award
  • Beds For All Who Come by Susan Bradley Smith (Five Islands Press)
  • Net Needle by Robert Adamson (Black Inc.)
  • Open House by David Brooks (University of Queensland Press)
  • The Guardians by Lucy Dougan (Giramondo)
  • Waiting for the Past by Les Murray (Black Inc.)

Unpublished Indigenous Writer – David Unaipon Award
  • The First Octoroon or Report of an Experimental Child by Andrew Booth
  • Social Consciousness Series by Mayrah Yarraga Dreise
  • A Question of Colour by Patricia Lees with Adam C. Lees

Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award
  • Araluen by Imogen Smith
  • Aurora by Elizabeth Kasmer
  • Sargasso by K W George
  • Wool Spin Burn by Kate Elkington

Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards
  • Andrew McMillan
  • Megan McGrath
  • Michelle Law
  • Rebecca Jessen
  • Sam George-Allen
The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award
  • Analogue Men by Nick Earls (Random House Australia)
  • From Convict to Politician by Mary Lou Simpson (Boolarong Press)
  • Joe’s Fruit Shop and Milk Bar by Zoe Boccabella (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • Navigatio by Patrick Holland (Transit Lounge Publishing)
  • Nest by Inga Simpson (Hachette Australia)
  • On the Road… With Kids by John Ahern (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • The Ash Burner by Kari Gislason (University of Queensland Press)
  • The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay by David Murray (Random House Australia)
 

2 Sep 2015

Add your vision to an exhibition about peace

Add your vision to an exhibition about peace

Queenslanders are invited to share their vision of peace by contributing a landscape artwork to State Library of Queensland’s next exhibitionPeace and Quiet.

Launching in late November,Peace and Quietwill be an exhibition created in collaboration with the community. It will provide an opportunity for visitors to explore a range of projects around the broad theme of peace, from the personal to the political.

State Librarian Janette Wright encouraged all Queenslanders to channel their creativity and help complete the series of events and activities in 2015 for the Anzac centenary commemorations.

“We would like Queenslanders from all walks of life to get involved and contribute an artwork depicting a landscape image – this could be a painting, drawing, print, photograph, or even stitchery."

“By contributing an image of a landscape that reflects your personal idea of peace, you can create a powerful reminder of what is lost in war. These images of peaceful landscapes will be mounted directly over the First World War wallpaper which currently engulfs SLQ Gallery as part of the Distant Lines exhibition."

“This is a wonderful opportunity for people of all ages and backgrounds to be involved in the development of an exhibition, and have your artwork displayed in one of Australia’s premier cultural institutions,” she said.

State Library will aim to display every original artwork that is entered, providing it meets the submission terms and conditions.

Submission forms must be completed by 2 November, and all artwork must be delivered to State Library by 23 November.

Further information including the submission form and terms and conditions is available fromslq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

Peace and Quiet, as part of State Library’sQ ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generationprogram, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.


Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 |stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

17 Aug 2015

What’s your Queensland Book of the Year?

What’s your Queensland Book of the Year?

Voting is now open for The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year as part of the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards program.

State Librarian Janette Wright today announced the shortlist for the competition, which features popular local authors Nick Earls and Kari Gislason, and opened voting to the public to decide who will take out the $10,000 prize.

“The People’s Choice award is a key category in the Queensland Literary Awards, celebrating great writing by local authors and giving readers the power to decide the winner,” said Ms Wright.

“The incredible diversity of Queensland writing talent is highlighted in the 2015 shortlist which includes crime reporting, family memoir, and some inspiring and creative new fiction.

“Queenslanders are avid readers and writers, with 84% of people reading or engaging in some form of creative writing. It is wonderful to have the support of The Courier-Mail for this award where readers become the judging panel,” she said.

The Courier-Mail editor Christopher Dore said the shortlisted titles showed the diversity and richness of content being produced by Queensland authors.

"This award is a great way for Queenslanders to show their support for local authors. The winner will join a prestigious group of previous recipients including surgeon Kellee Slater and internationally renowned writer Kate Morton,” Mr Dore said.

Patrick Holland, one of the nominated authors, received a Queensland Writers Fellowship in 2013, and won the Emerging Queensland Author – Manuscript Award in 2005. This is testament to how important competitions like these are to supporting, nurturing and developing local writing talent.

Members of the public can vote for their favourite shortlisted book at the Queensland Literary Awards website qldliteraryawards.org.au until 18 September.

The winner will be announced at the Queensland Literary Awards ceremony in October.

In 2015 the Queensland government is providing funding of $5,000 to match the $5,000 sponsorship for The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year for a total prize of $10,000.


The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award Shortlist 2015

  • Analogue Men, Nick Earls (Random House Australia)
  • Navigatio, Patrick Holland (Transit Lounge Publishing)
  • Nest, Inga Simpson (Hachette Australia)
  • The Ash Burner, Kari Gislason (UQP)
  • Joe's Fruit Shop and Milk Bar, Zoe Boccabella (HarperCollins Publishers)
  • On the Road…. With Kids, John Ahern (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay, David Murray (Random House Australia)
  • From Convict to Politician, Mary Lou  Simpson (Boolarong Press)


Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 | stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

Pages: 5 6 7 8 9

For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

Library membership

Become an SLQ member now to access our services, collections and facilities.

Library Shop online

Discover an eclectic range of books, gifts, reproduction prints and more at the Library Shop.