Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

9 Oct 2015

Premier names winners of 2015 Queensland Literary Awards

Premier names winners of 2015 Queensland Literary Awards

Premier and Arts Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk has announced the winners of new literary awards supported by the Queensland Government at tonight’s presentation at State Library of Queensland. 

“This year my government reinstated support for the Queensland Literary Awards, matching the sponsorship and funding of ten awards and establishing new awards,” the Premier said. 

“Tonight we see the results of that decision – the celebration of talented voices telling Queensland stories. 

“The winner of the $25 000 Queensland Premier’s Award for a Work of State Significance is Warrior, by Libby Connors, for the dramatic story of young Aboriginal leader Dundalli and his life on the colonial frontier set against a portrait of early Brisbane. 

“This award recognises writing with a Queensland focus, celebrating important Queensland authors, stories, history and voices and the judges’ decision to award Warrior was unanimous,” Ms Palaszczuk said. 

The winners of the two Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards for writers aged 18-30, each to the value of $12 500, are Megan McGrath, who was raised on North Stradbroke Island and Toowoomba-based Rebecca Jessen. 

The prize includes career development support from Queensland Writers Centre, to help foster the next generation of Queensland writers. 

The three $20,000 Queensland Writers’ Fellowships go to Sunshine Coast-based Inga Simpson, Brisbane writer Krissy Kneen and Karen Foxlee, who lives in Gympie.

“These writers will use their fellowships to develop a manuscript or writing project towards publication by the end of 2016,” the Premier said.

The Premier applauded the QLA organisers, sponsors and publishers who kept the awards alive when the previous governments stripped funding.

“Congratulations to all involved for refusing to let Queensland voices be silenced, for maintaining a fine tradition of recognising our literary talent,” she said. 

In 2015, the Queensland Literary Awards, administered by State Library of Queensland, awarded writers in twelve categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry, including The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award. 

The Queensland Literary Awards are supported through the Queensland Government, the University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, Claire Booth, the Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail. 

For a complete list of winners see www.qldliteraryawards.org.au.

Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson | Cinnamon Watson Publicity | 0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

Photos available upon request.

28 Sep 2015

How should we remember Queensland’s First World War history?

How should we remember Queensland’s First World War history?

Join leading historical thinkers to discuss and debate the role of the Anzac legend at State Library of Queensland’s upcoming symposium, How we remember.

How we remember: responding to 100 years since the First World War is a free, interactive forum that will encourage participants to rethink our understanding of Queensland’s First World War history.

Commencing with a welcome function and keynote address on the evening prior, the full day symposium on Wednesday 14 October will feature individual presentations and panel discussions from academics, writers, journalists, curators and musicians.

Guest presenters, such as Adjunct Associate Professor, author, and former Australian army officer James Brown and historian and author Dr Carolyn Holbrook, will each share their unique perspectives on memory, myth-making, the historical reality of the war, the notion of the sacred, and how these relate to Australia’s remembrance of the First World War.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said it was also important to consider how these ideas impact on future generations of Queenslanders.

“The history and memory of the Anzac legend has evolved over time and each community will respond in their own unique way to this, with their own unique stories,” Ms Enoch said.

“By understanding the value that the Anzac legend holds for different communities, we can begin to answer the question of how we can inclusively commemorate, communicate and remember these First World War stories.”

State Librarian Janette Wright said that this centenary year of the Gallipoli landing was a timely moment to re-examine our nation’s understanding of remembrance and commemoration.

“The Anzac legend has come to occupy an immense space in our national psyche, with the prolific re-telling of the story of Gallipoli as ‘the birth of a nation’,” Ms Wright said.

“Commemoration is seen by most Australians as a way to remember and honour the fallen, imbuing their memory with a sense of sacredness.”

How we remember will explore this narrative, as well as give voice to those who seek to highlight the populist nature of this history telling and advocate for a more historically accurate record. The symposium aims to share both sides of this contentious debate.”

For more information and to register for the free symposium, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

How we remember: responding to 100 years since the First World War is part of Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation, a five year legacy project led by State Library and proudly supported by the Queensland Government.


How we remember: responding to 100 years since the First World War
State Library of Queensland
Free, bookings required

Tue 13 Oct, 6pm–8pm
Keynote address and welcome function

Wed 14 Oct, 9am–3.30pm
Presentations and panel discussions, incl. morning tea and lunch

Interview opportunities:
Keynote speaker (Tue 13 Oct)
Adjunct Associate Professor James Brown, former Australian army officer and author of Anzac’s Long Shadow
Keynote speaker (Wed 14 Oct)
Dr Carolyn Holbrook, historian and author of Anzac: the unauthorised biography

Media enquiries:
Keziah Sydes, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9346 | keziah.sydes@slq.qld.gov.au

21 Sep 2015

Think Outside: Leading designers explore design and conflict

Think Outside: Leading designers explore design and conflict

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is asking leading designers to step outside their comfort zone and apply their way of thinking in new contexts.

Think Outside is a free annual talk series hosted by SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library, which invites local, national and international design thinkers to contemplate a problem outside their area of expertise, offering new and unexpected solutions for discussion.

This year’s series looks at the intersection between design and conflict, challenging panellists to consider how design might counteract the ongoing social, environmental and psychological impacts of conflict.

The series kicks-off on Wednesday 30 September, with panellists being asked: how might design employ acts of repair before, during and after conflict?

State Librarian Janette Wright said design thinking is a creative, future-focussed problem-solving process that matches needs with opportunities.

“Design thinking is becoming increasingly recognised as a powerful process for creatively exploring the challenges of the 21st century, beyond the traditional realm of designing products,” Ms Wright said.

“We’re curious to explore what happens when powerful minds are challenged to think outside their comfort zone and apply their way of thinking to the context of conflict in its many forms."

“By asking leading design thinkers these significant questions, we hope to ignite discussion that inspires new ideas and possibilities, leading to broader conversations and action on this issue,” she said.

Each speaker will have 15 minutes to be as provocative and evocative as they wish, setting the platform for a considered debate and discussion with the audience, around the practical implications of these new ideas.

2015 marks the third year of State Library’s Think Outside series, which has developed a strong track record of attracting outstanding panellists, and generating engaging and thought-provoking discussion.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for more details and to book tickets.

Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 | stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

11 Sep 2015

2015 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist announcement

2015 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist announcement

State Librarian Janette Wright today announced the shortlists for the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards (QLA), highlighting the incredible strength and diversity in Australian writing talent.

The QLA is a community driven awards program, managed by State Library of Queensland, which nurtures and celebrates the talent and achievement of Australian writers. This year 58 authors have been shortlisted across 12 categories.

In releasing the shortlists, Ms Wright said the continued support for the QLA from authors, sponsors, publishers and the literary community had been exceptional.

“From distinguished and highly celebrated authors such as Joan London and J.M. Coetzee, to talented debut authors like Ellen van Neerven, the Queensland Literary Awards continue to attract the highest calibre of literature across Australia,” Ms Wright said.

“The judges, across all categories, have had an extremely challenging task short listing from such a rich field of nominations and I thank them for their work."

“We are grateful for the continued support of key QLA partners including the University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, Claire Booth, the Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail,” she said.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said the QLA were an integral part of Australia’s literary scene.

“They are a true celebration of our stories: the stories of young Australians, our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, of urban and regional Australians,” Ms Enoch said.

In addition to the QLA, three Queensland Writers Fellowships will provide support for Queensland authors to develop their work for publication.

Readers have the power to pick the winner of the popular The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year category. Members of the public can vote online at qldliteraryawards.org.au until 18 September.

The award winners and fellowship recipients will be announced at a special awards ceremony to be held in October.

The shortlists can be found at qldliteraryawards.org.au

The 2015 Queensland Literary Award categories are:

  • Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance
  • University of Queensland Fiction Book Award
  • University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award
  • Griffith University Young Adult Book Award
  • Griffith University Children’s Book Award
  • University of Southern Queensland History Book Award
  • University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award
  • State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award
  • Unpublished Indigenous Writer - David Unaipon Award (supported by the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund and University of Queensland Press)
  • Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award (supported by University of Queensland Press)
  • Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards
  • The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book for the Year

Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson | Cinnamon Watson Publicity
0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

 

2015 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist

Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance
  • Heat and Light by Ellen van Neerven (University of Queensland Press)
  • Joe’s Fruit Shop and Milk Bar by Zoe Boccabella (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • Queensland; Everything you ever wanted to know, but were afraid to ask by Mark Bahnisch (NewSouth Publishing)
  • Through the Wall: Reflections on Leadership, Love and Survival by Anna Bligh (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • Warrior by Libby Connors (Allen & Unwin)
University of Queensland Fiction Book Award
  • A Short History of Richard Kline by Amanda Lohrey (Black Inc.)
  • The Golden Age by Joan London (Random House Australia)
  • The Snow Kimono by Mark Henshaw (Text Publishing)
  • The Wonder Lover by Malcolm Knox (Allen & Unwin)
  • To Name Those Lost by Rohan Wilson (Allen & Unwin)
University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award
  • Mannix by Brenda Niall (Text Publishing)
  • The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia by Don Watson (Penguin)
  • The Life of I: The New Culture of Narcissism by Anne Manne (Melbourne University Press)
  • The Wife Drought by Annabel Crabb (Random House Australia)
  • Thea Astley: Inventing Her Own Weather by Karen Lamb (University of Queensland Press)

Griffith University Young Adult Book Award
  • Are you Seeing Me? by Darren Groth (Random House Australia)
  • Razorhurst by Justine Larbalestier (Allen & Unwin)
  • The Minnow by Diana Sweeney (Text Publishing)
  • The Pause by John Larkin (Random House Australia)
  • Vanishing Point by Jeri Kroll (Puncher and Wattman)

Griffith University Children's Book Award
  • A Single Stone by Meg McKinlay (Walker Books Australia)
  • Figgy in the World by Tamsin Janu (Omnibus Books)
  • Lucky by David Mackintosh (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • New Boy by Nick Earls (Penguin)
  • Teacup by Rebecca Young & Matt Ottley (Scholastic Australia)

University of Southern Queensland History Book Award
  • ANZAC, The Unauthorised Biography by Carolyn Holbrook (NewSouth Publishing)
  • Settler Society in the Australian Colonies: Self-Government and Imperial Culture by Angela Woollacott (Oxford University Press)
  • The Invisible History of the Human Race by Christine Kenneally (Black Inc.)
  • Visiting the Neighbours: Australians in Asia by Agnieszka Sobocinska (NewSouth Publishing)
  • Warning: The Story of Cyclone Tracy by Sophie Cunningham (Text Publishing)

University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award
  • Arms Race and Other Stories by Nic Low (Text Publishing)
  • Bapo by Nick Jose (Giramondo)
  • Heat and Light by Ellen van Neerven (University of Queensland Press)
  • Merciless Gods by Christos Tsiolkas (Allen & Unwin)
  • Three Stories by J.M. Coetzee (Text Publishing)

State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award
  • Beds For All Who Come by Susan Bradley Smith (Five Islands Press)
  • Net Needle by Robert Adamson (Black Inc.)
  • Open House by David Brooks (University of Queensland Press)
  • The Guardians by Lucy Dougan (Giramondo)
  • Waiting for the Past by Les Murray (Black Inc.)

Unpublished Indigenous Writer – David Unaipon Award
  • The First Octoroon or Report of an Experimental Child by Andrew Booth
  • Social Consciousness Series by Mayrah Yarraga Dreise
  • A Question of Colour by Patricia Lees with Adam C. Lees

Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award
  • Araluen by Imogen Smith
  • Aurora by Elizabeth Kasmer
  • Sargasso by K W George
  • Wool Spin Burn by Kate Elkington

Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards
  • Andrew McMillan
  • Megan McGrath
  • Michelle Law
  • Rebecca Jessen
  • Sam George-Allen
The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award
  • Analogue Men by Nick Earls (Random House Australia)
  • From Convict to Politician by Mary Lou Simpson (Boolarong Press)
  • Joe’s Fruit Shop and Milk Bar by Zoe Boccabella (Harper Collins Publishers)
  • Navigatio by Patrick Holland (Transit Lounge Publishing)
  • Nest by Inga Simpson (Hachette Australia)
  • On the Road… With Kids by John Ahern (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • The Ash Burner by Kari Gislason (University of Queensland Press)
  • The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay by David Murray (Random House Australia)
 

2 Sep 2015

Add your vision to an exhibition about peace

Add your vision to an exhibition about peace

Queenslanders are invited to share their vision of peace by contributing a landscape artwork to State Library of Queensland’s next exhibitionPeace and Quiet.

Launching in late November,Peace and Quietwill be an exhibition created in collaboration with the community. It will provide an opportunity for visitors to explore a range of projects around the broad theme of peace, from the personal to the political.

State Librarian Janette Wright encouraged all Queenslanders to channel their creativity and help complete the series of events and activities in 2015 for the Anzac centenary commemorations.

“We would like Queenslanders from all walks of life to get involved and contribute an artwork depicting a landscape image – this could be a painting, drawing, print, photograph, or even stitchery."

“By contributing an image of a landscape that reflects your personal idea of peace, you can create a powerful reminder of what is lost in war. These images of peaceful landscapes will be mounted directly over the First World War wallpaper which currently engulfs SLQ Gallery as part of the Distant Lines exhibition."

“This is a wonderful opportunity for people of all ages and backgrounds to be involved in the development of an exhibition, and have your artwork displayed in one of Australia’s premier cultural institutions,” she said.

State Library will aim to display every original artwork that is entered, providing it meets the submission terms and conditions.

Submission forms must be completed by 2 November, and all artwork must be delivered to State Library by 23 November.

Further information including the submission form and terms and conditions is available fromslq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

Peace and Quiet, as part of State Library’sQ ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generationprogram, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.


Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 |stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

17 Aug 2015

Students share personal stories about their Anzac experience

Students share personal stories about their Anzac experience

Brimming with national pride, a group of students who travelled to Gallipoli for the Anzac Centenary in April are sharing their experiences at State Library of Queensland (SLQ).

Voices from Afar in SLQ Gallery is part of the Distant Lines First World War exhibition. It showcases the individual journeys of 15 recipients of the 2015 Premier’s Anzac Prize through video, photographs and personal belongings.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said it was clear the Anzac legacy would continue to teach students important lessons despite the passage of time.

“The 70 students who travelled to Gallipoli made an educational and emotional journey,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

“The Premier’s Anzac Prize was designed to teach a new generation of Queenslanders about the true Anzac spirit. This installation reflects the deeper understanding of our history that these students gained.”

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said Voices from Afar is helping the community achieve an unprecedented connection with the people and places which forged the Anzac tradition.

“My hope is that the experiences of these students will have a multiplier effect in our schools and communities, encouraging their friends, families, and people they meet to take a greater interest in this pivotal event in our history,” she said.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the students participated in the 100th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli and visited battlegrounds, First World War memorials and cemeteries on the Western Front for two weeks in April and May this year.

“In Voices from Afar, the students give a first-hand account of their experiences walking in the footsteps of the Anzacs and learning about the Anzac legacy,” Ms Wright said.

For Theo Delaney of Shalom College in Bundaberg, the trip was of historical and personal significance.

“The Premier’s Anzac Prize tour was an experience that will stay with me for the rest of my life,” Theo said.

“I saw the places where our forebears fought for our freedom and my great grandfather fought and his brother died and is buried. The emotions that I felt were indescribable.”

For Jack Hill of Ferny Grove State High School, the Anzac tradition has taken on a new meaning since the tour.

“It’s no longer that amorphous idea of sacrifice and mateship, but it’s those individual stories of people doing their job but going that little bit above, going that little bit extra with bravery that is amazing in the face of such severe opposition as the Turks did provide,” he said.

“We had an opportunity to walk down onto the rocky shore of Anzac Cove and spend some time there. That was an amazing morning being able to sit down there, hear the waves rushing, feel the stones in your hand and realise that these same waves that were rushing now were the waves that people, potentially your age, were washing up in as they tried to fight against these Turkish defenders as they came up the shores at Anzac Cove.”

Lachlan McLean of Prince of Peace Lutheran College at Everton Hills said the trip was, at times, quite emotional.

“The most emotional point for me was at Cape Helles – I was reading all the names on the wall and I found the name AJ McLean which is the name of my dad and my grandpa and that hit me very hard. From then on I had an obsession with finding all the McLeans. I wanted to ensure that everyone from my family was commemorated. My idea of Anzac has changed completely since returning. Now I understand the sacrifice and commitment shown by the soldiers. As soon as you are there and you see a grave with the inscription age 17, that’s confronting.”

Voices from Afar is proudly supported by the Queensland Government and is on display until 27 September 2015. For more information on the installation and the Distant Lines exhibition visit qanzac100.slq.qld.gov.au

Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson Publicity | 0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

17 Aug 2015

What’s your Queensland Book of the Year?

What’s your Queensland Book of the Year?

Voting is now open for The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year as part of the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards program.

State Librarian Janette Wright today announced the shortlist for the competition, which features popular local authors Nick Earls and Kari Gislason, and opened voting to the public to decide who will take out the $10,000 prize.

“The People’s Choice award is a key category in the Queensland Literary Awards, celebrating great writing by local authors and giving readers the power to decide the winner,” said Ms Wright.

“The incredible diversity of Queensland writing talent is highlighted in the 2015 shortlist which includes crime reporting, family memoir, and some inspiring and creative new fiction.

“Queenslanders are avid readers and writers, with 84% of people reading or engaging in some form of creative writing. It is wonderful to have the support of The Courier-Mail for this award where readers become the judging panel,” she said.

The Courier-Mail editor Christopher Dore said the shortlisted titles showed the diversity and richness of content being produced by Queensland authors.

"This award is a great way for Queenslanders to show their support for local authors. The winner will join a prestigious group of previous recipients including surgeon Kellee Slater and internationally renowned writer Kate Morton,” Mr Dore said.

Patrick Holland, one of the nominated authors, received a Queensland Writers Fellowship in 2013, and won the Emerging Queensland Author – Manuscript Award in 2005. This is testament to how important competitions like these are to supporting, nurturing and developing local writing talent.

Members of the public can vote for their favourite shortlisted book at the Queensland Literary Awards website qldliteraryawards.org.au until 18 September.

The winner will be announced at the Queensland Literary Awards ceremony in October.

In 2015 the Queensland government is providing funding of $5,000 to match the $5,000 sponsorship for The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year for a total prize of $10,000.


The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award Shortlist 2015

  • Analogue Men, Nick Earls (Random House Australia)
  • Navigatio, Patrick Holland (Transit Lounge Publishing)
  • Nest, Inga Simpson (Hachette Australia)
  • The Ash Burner, Kari Gislason (UQP)
  • Joe's Fruit Shop and Milk Bar, Zoe Boccabella (HarperCollins Publishers)
  • On the Road…. With Kids, John Ahern (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay, David Murray (Random House Australia)
  • From Convict to Politician, Mary Lou  Simpson (Boolarong Press)


Media enquiries
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 | stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

31 Jul 2015

Queensland Business History Award recipient announced

Queensland Business History Award recipient announced

Brisbane Racing Club received the honour of the 2015 Queensland Business History Award at last night’s Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Induction Dinner.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the Queensland Business History Award, presented by State Library of Queensland, Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School as part of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame partnership, recognises leadership in collecting, preserving and sharing business history.

“This annual award promotes the importance of good record keeping and preservation and acknowledges companies that protect and promote their corporate history and heritage collections,” Ms Wright said.

“This year’s recipient, Brisbane Racing Club, holds more than 140 years of racing administration experience. The club formed in July 2009 as a result of a merger between the Queensland Turf Club, which dated back to 1865, and the Brisbane Turf Club — an amalgamation that was the first of its kind for the Australian racing industry.”

Brisbane Racing Club preserves the history of thoroughbred horse racing in Queensland in conjunction with the Thoroughbred Racing History Association with its heritage unit, archives, engagement activities and Old Tote Racing Museum.

The museum showcases intriguing historical items such as trophies, early photos of horses, jockeys, committee members and racecourses, Queensland racing calendars dating back to 1887, Queensland Turf Club entries from 1890, historic racing books, trophies and memorabilia.

Located at Eagle Farm racecourse, the Old Tote Racing Museum is open by appointment and on race days. At nearby Doomben, the Archives of historic books, papers and photographs is open every Wednesday or by appointment.

“Photos, receipts, annual reports, film archive, posters, internal magazines and oral histories all play a part in telling Queensland’s business narrative,” Ms Wright said.

“Brisbane Racing Club is a great example of an organisation that is showing excellence in conservation works and most importantly sharing its fascinating history with the general public.”

Preserving business records helps co-create Queensland’s memory for future generations and State Library of Queensland encourages all businesses to follow Brisbane Racing Club’s lead.

For more information on the award and the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame visit www.halloffame.slq.qld.gov.au

Media enquiries: Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9803 | kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au

23 Jul 2015

Thinking outside the box: State Library launches Australia’s first Ideas Box in Mapoon

Thinking outside the box: State Library launches Australia’s first Ideas Box in Mapoon

State Library of Queensland today launched Australia’s first Ideas Box in the remote community of Mapoon, enabling access to technology, and creative and learning opportunities.

The Ideas Box is a revolutionary, portable media centre conceived by international NGO Libraries Without Borders (Bibliothèques Sans Frontières), to provide vulnerable and isolated populations access to books, technology, and information.

Designed by renowned French designer Philippe Starck, the Ideas Box fits on two pallets, is a robust library in a box, can be tailored to different communities, and can be installed in less than 30 minutes in any environment, so long as there is a roof and 100 square metres floor space.

Minister for Science and Innovation Leeanne Enoch said the Ideas Box presented the opportunity for the 350 people living in Mapoon to experience a state-of-the-art library service.

“Libraries play an important role in communities today, and are often used as community hubs for creative opportunities and skills development,” Ms Enoch said.

“The Ideas Box will provide a place where community members can come together for social activities, to pursue personal interests and continue on their path of lifelong learning,” she said.

State Librarian Janette Wright said this was the first time an Ideas Box had been deployed in the southern hemisphere.

“State Library is committed to enhancing Queenslanders’ access to information, resources and programs that inspire learning, creativity, curiosity and innovation, in partnership with over 325 public libraries and 25 Indigenous Knowledge Centres,” Ms Wright said.

“Remote communities like Mapoon face unique challenges, and it can be difficult for them to access new technology, cultural and learning resources and opportunities, that many Queenslanders take for granted.

“State Library has been working closely with Libraries Without Borders, Mapoon Aboriginal Shire Council, Kowanyama Aboriginal Shire Council, and State Library of Western Australia to introduce the first Ideas Box in Australia, to give these communities currently without an Indigenous Knowledge Centre an opportunity to experience state-of-the-art library services,” she said.

Libraries Without Borders Chairman Patrick Weil said each Ideas Box unfolds to create a customised library and media centre, with internet access and its own power source. It includes a library module, an IT module with internet connection, a cinema module, and administration module, as well as contents such as tablet devices, books and games that have been selected in consultation with the Mapoon community.

“The Ideas Box is a remarkable toolbox that empowers children and adults alike to pave foundations for a self-reliant future,” Mr Weil said.

The Ideas Box will remain in Mapoon for six months, and will then be relocated to the Kowanyama community for six months. The program will also be rolled-out to remote Indigenous communities in Western Australia in 2016.

Mapoon Aboriginal Shire Council Mayor, Peter Guivarra, said he was thrilled that the Mapoon community will be host to the first Ideas Box in Australia.

“Through the implementation of the Ideas Box, the Council is aiming to: create a culture of learning in the community; engage our young people in a style of learning that suits them; and provide wider community access for skills development,” Mr Guivarra said.

“The employment of a local Ideas Box Coordinator will help us ensure this social legacy lives on, long after the Ideas Box moves on.

“The collection of books selected by the community for the Ideas Box will stay with the community after the Ideas Box leaves Mapoon, along with the learning and knowledge gained from the Ideas Box which will assist Council in transitioning to ongoing library services,” he said.

The Ideas Box rollout in Australia is being led by State Library of Queensland in partnership with Libraries Without Borders (Bibliothèques Sans Frontières), Mapoon Aboriginal Shire Council and Kowanyama Aboriginal Shire Council, and with the support of the Puma Energy Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation and Queensland Library Foundation.

For more information about the Ideas Box see www.ideas-box.org

Interview opportunities

State Library of Queensland
Director Regional Access and Public Libraries
Ross Duncan

Mapoon Aboriginal Shire Council
Mayor
Peter Guivarra

Libraries Without Borders
Ideas Box International Program Manager
Pierre Chevalier

Images available upon request.

Media enquiries

Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7784 | stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

23 Jun 2015

Last chance to enter Young Writers Award

Last chance to enter Young Writers Award

Aspiring young writers have until 17 July to enter their short story in State Library's Young Writers Award, and kick-start their literary career.

Now in its twentieth year, this annual short story competition was a great opportunity for young writers to gain exposure to the publishing industry and receive invaluable professional development opportunities.

"Queensland is home to many talented young creatives, and it is competitions like the Young Writers Award that help unearth that talent, providing the support and encouragement needed to further their literary careers," Ms Wright said.

"State Library is committed to cultivating the talents and careers of emerging young writers in Queensland.

"I encourage all 15 to 25 year old Queenslanders to channel their creativity and determination, and share stories that are meaningful to them," she said.

The winner of the 18-25 year old category will receive $2,000 prize money, along with a 12 month membership to the Queensland Writers Centre and the Australian Writer's Marketplace online, a Brisbane Writers Festival pack and admission to a Queensland Writers Centre industry seminar.

The winner of the 15-17 year old category will receive an Apple iPad air 2, a $100 iTunes gift voucher, a 12 month membership to the Queensland Writers Centre and admission to a Story lab holiday workshop at State Library of Queensland.

If you're thinking of entering, here are some tips on how to get noticed:

  • Be confident in your writing
  • Relax and don't try too hard. Use language that comes naturally to you and when you're writing, try to let it flow.
  • Judges are looking for stories with distinctive and interesting characters and plots – get to know who your characters are and where your plot is going first, and the language will follow.
  • They're all good ideas, but don't try to cram them all into one piece. Think about your core themes and characters and stick by them – your loyalty will pay off in the end.

The Young Writers Award closes at 5pm on Friday 17 July 2015. For entry details and to read past winning stories visit SLQ's What's On page.

The Young Writers Award is funded by State Library of Queensland and supported by Queensland Writers Centre, Brisbane Writers Festival and Australian Writer's Marketplace.

Media enquiries:
Stephanie Birch, SLQ Communications
07 3842 7784 | stephanie.birch@slq.qld.gov.au

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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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