Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

25 Sep 2017

Celebrate the arts and sciences at State Library

Celebrate the arts and sciences at State Library

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is helping young people and families engage with the arts and sciences in a meaningful way by hosting a free, family-friendly Fun Palace event on Saturday 7 October.

For one day only, SLQ will be transformed into a dedicated wonderland of scientific enquiry and creativity as art and science collide.

This year’s SLQ Fun Palace will feature an intriguing presentation by well-known science broadcaster and author Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, an explosive performance by Street Science, and a host of activities, workshops, and demonstrations.

Visitors can expect to get hands-on with a range of innovative technologies, expanding on the highly popular Digital Futures Lab interactive exhibition.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said Fun Palace is a true celebration of art, science, innovation and discovery, and offers a world of opportunity for Queensland’s younger generation.

“Queensland is moving into the information economy and it is essential that young people have access to and are participating in creative and scientific pursuits,” Ms Enoch said.

“Fun Palace offers young people a chance to try their hand at a range of art and science-related activities in a family-friendly, community-led environment, and provides an opportunity to see what sparks their interests and gets them excited.”

Fun Palace is a global movement, held annually on the first weekend of October, which encourages everyone to be an artist and a scientist for a day by interacting with a range of fun and informative activities and performances.

The first worldwide Fun Palaces where held in October 2014, when 138 venues, locations, communities and groups created their own local events.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said SLQ is excited to be part of the worldwide Fun Palace movement for the third year in a row.

“The Fun Palace concept is about working with our communities to get people excited about and engaged in the arts and sciences.

“The event encourages people of all ages, with a particular focus on children and families, to get hands-on and minds-on with a range of artistic and scientific disciplines such as ecology, coding, engineering, writing, illustrating, and more,” Ms McDonald said.

SLQ will host its Fun Palace on Saturday 7 October from 9.30am to 2.30pm. Entry and all activities are free and open to the public.

Interviews and images available upon request.

Media enquiries
Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

SLQ is proud to be a Fun Palace Maker in Fun Palaces happening around the world.

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki appears by arrangement with Claxton Speakers International.

5 Sep 2017

2017 Queensland Literary Awards finalists announced

2017 Queensland Literary Awards finalists announced

The diversity and excellence of literature from Queensland and across Australia has been recognised with the announcement today of the finalists for the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards (QLAs).

Presented by the State Library of Queensland (SLQ), the QLAs offer prizes for writers in thirteen categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry, for published and unpublished work.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that celebrating some of the best examples of locally-developed literature through events such as the QLAs is central to the State Library of Queensland’s commitment to nurturing a culture of reading, writing and ideas.

“This year’s shortlist includes important accounts of real life events that have shaped Queensland communities and individuals, as well as extraordinary works of creativity and imagination.”

“The QLA have fostered the careers of writers such as Cathy McLennan, who has progressed from winning the Emerging Queensland Writer award in 2014 through to a nomination for the Queensland Premier’s Award for a Work of State Significance for her remarkable non-fiction book Saltwater in 2017,” Ms McDonald said.

“Nominees also include last year’s winner of The Courier-Mail People’s Choice category, Mary-Rose Maccoll, a writer who has previously been celebrated for fictional works, but in 2017 has received three nominations for her deeply personal non-fiction title, For a Girl.”

Ms McDonald noted the introduction of the QUT Digital Literature Award by SLQ in 2017 to acknowledge contemporary publishing and digital innovation in storytelling.

“Queensland has always been home to a vibrant and passionate literary community and we are proud to continue supporting writing, publishing and reading, both in print and online,” Ms McDonald said.

“We are grateful to have the continued support of key QLA partners including the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, University of Southern Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail.”

The Queensland Government continues to match sponsor and partnership funding across all award categories, and in partnership with SLQ supports three Queensland Writers Fellowships of $15,000 to provide authors
with an opportunity to develop their manuscripts and writing projects.

The award winners and fellowship recipients will be announced at a special ceremony to be held at State Library of Queensland on Wednesday 4 October.

The shortlists can be found at qldliteraryawards.org.au/about/shortlists

Media enquiries:
Amanda Lawson, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

25 Aug 2017

Neon glow illuminates State Library

Neon glow illuminates State Library

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) has turned on the lights for The Salon Electric, a celebration of neon and design.

Iconic pieces curated by neon sign maker Michael Blazek are now on display alongside historical photographs from SLQ’s collections.

Housed in SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library, The Salon Electric explores the process of making neon, its relationship to nightlife subculture, and the role of neon in contemporary art and design.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the collections share a unique period in Queensland’s history and aim to ignite Queenslanders’ living memory.

“The historical images speak to a different, more carefree, time — from the heyday of the Gold Coast’s glitter strip to the regional motel signs dotting the highways,” Ms McDonald said.

“Together with Michael’s Blazek’s curated signs, The Salon Electric tells the story of neon signage in Queensland and highlights the role of the maker in design.”

Second generation neon sign maker Michael Blazek has worked with SLQ to curate signage from his personal collection as well as essential tools of the trade.

The Salon Electric features iconic Brisbane pieces from Jo-Jo’s restaurant, Kookaburra Cafe, and Mr Fourex’s beer.

Queenslanders are invited to share their own photographs of local neon signs to aid SLQ in digitally capturing this period of signage and design history.

Using the social media platform Historypin, visitors can upload images from home, add a location, and explore visuals of other signs across the state.

Mr Blazek estimates there are only 200 large scale neon signs left in Queensland, with many signs steadily taken out of service over the past decade.

“There are so many beautiful signs that are disappearing and that’s really sad,” he said.

“Neon is a long-standing and unique form of design, and the slow dismantling of signs is a huge loss to the design community.”

Visitors can meet Michael in a special Q&A session on Tuesday 5 September, following the Queensland premiere screening of Brisbane-produced documentary NEON.

Directed by Lawrence Johnston and produced by Veronica Fury, NEON explores the beauty, invention, design and heritage of the neon sign in a journey across America.

NEON was produced with assistance from Screen Queensland, Film Victoria, and the Premiere Fund of the Melbourne International Film Festival.

The Salon Electric is open daily in the Design Lounge, level 2, State Library of Queensland until February 2018.

For more information visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

NEON
Queensland premiere

Tuesday 5 September, 6pm–8pm
SLQ Auditorium 1, level 2
State Library of Queensland
Cultural Precinct, South Bank

Followed by Q&A with

  • Michael Blazek, neon sign maker and The Salon Electric curator
  • Lawrence Johnston, NEON film director
  • Veronica Fury, NEON film producer

High resolution images available upon request

Media enquiries
SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

25 Aug 2017

Vote for your Queensland Book of the Year

Vote for your Queensland Book of the Year

Voting for The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year as part of the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards opens today.

The winning author will receive a $10,000 prize at the Queensland Literary Awards (QLAs) in October, with The Courier-Mail’s sponsorship matched by funding from the Queensland Government.

Premier and Arts Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk welcomed the announcement of this year’s shortlisted books for People’s Choice Queensland Book of the year and encouraged Queenslanders to participate and support the wonderful authors vying for the award.

“My Government is pleased to support our talented local writers through the Queensland Literary Awards, and I encourage booklovers to cast their votes for the People’s Choice award and champion contemporary Queensland authors,” said Ms Palaszczuk.

“It is important we recognise the state’s outstanding literary talent, support the telling and celebration of our stories and foster our next generation of writing talent.”

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said that the People’s Choice Award is one of the prestigious categories of the QLAs and revealed many talented writers.

“Our state has a proud history of producing exceptional literary talent and this award is a wonderful opportunity for Queensland readers to support and celebrate local writers.”

State Librarian and CEO, Vicki McDonald today announced the shortlist for the award, which includes popular authors Nick Earls and Mary-Rose MacColl, the recipient of the 2016 award for her novel Swimming Home.

“The books nominated for the People’s Choice award in 2017 are reflective of the creativity, diversity and tenacity of the people of Queensland,” said Ms McDonald.

“The shortlist includes flights of fancy from stifling Brisbane summers to Byzantine adventures, powerful stories of secrets and survival, and connections to community and family.”

The Courier-Mail editor Lachlan Heywood said the People’s Choice award offers everyday Queenslanders the chance to join the judging panel and support local writers.

"The Courier-Mail is passionate about promoting literacy and supporting Queensland talent, and is proud to help highlight such an accomplished group of authors” said Mr Heywood.

Amongst this year's nominees is Cathy McLennan’s Saltwater, previously awarded the 2014 Emerging Queensland Author – Unpublished Manuscript (under the title We Come From Saltwater People). The progression of this important true story illustrates the crucial developmental support that the QLAs provide to emerging Queensland authors.

Queenslanders have until Monday 25 September to vote online at qldliteraryawards.org.au.

The winner of The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year will be announced at the Queensland Literary Awards ceremony, to be held at State Library of Queensland on Wednesday 4 October.

The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award Shortlist 2017:

  • The Birdman's Wife by Melissa Ashley (Affirm Press)
  • Vancouver by Nick Earls (Inkerman & Blunt)
  • Ghost Empire by Richard Fidler (HarperCollins)
  • A Hundred Small Lessons by Ashley Hay (Allen & Unwin)
  • Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms by Anita Heiss (Simon & Schuster)
  • To Prey and To Silence by Joan Isaacs (A and A Publishing)
  • For a Girl by Mary-Rose MacColl (Allen & Unwin)
  • Saltwater by Cathy McLennan (UQP)

The Queensland Government through State Library of Queensland and Arts Queensland supports and champions the Queensland Literary Awards in nurturing a culture of reading, writing and ideas.

Media enquiries:
Amanda Lawson, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

23 Aug 2017

Thousands more Queensland seniors to be given helping hand to bridge digital divide

Ministerial statement

Thousands more Queensland seniors to be given helping hand to bridge digital divide

The state’s seniors will be going digital with more than 10,000 people expected to get involved in the popular Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland program.

Minister for Innovation, Science and Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said today (Wednesday) training sessions will be delivered at 30 public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres across the state as part of the program.

Ms Enoch said the program will teach Queensland seniors to use a variety of technologies to help them navigate the evolving digital world. 

“This program will provide Queensland’s growing seniors population with the skills needed to securely access essential services online,” Ms Enoch said.

“The digital world is changing at a rapid pace and navigating it comfortably is something often take for granted. Tech Savvy Seniors delivers well-paced sessions to help seniors develop a range of useful skills including how to use a smartphone and an iPad, the basics of social media, and how to shop online and access core government services. The program strives to get Queensland’s older population online with confidence, help reduce social isolation often experienced from not being digitally connected, and improve resilience to online fraud and financial abuse. In fact, this year we’ve rolled out two new digital services for Queenslanders over 60. Our Seniors Concessions service enables Queensland seniors to apply for and access multiple concessions through a single process, saving them time, money, and effort. We are looking for feedback on our new My Account dashboard. My Account personalises government services around your needs, age and location and presents it together in one easy and convenient dashboard. My Account works for all Queenslanders, but we have started by focusing on services for seniors. This meets the government’s commitment to improving services for over 60s in the Queensland: An Age Friendly Community Action Plan.”

Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland – in its second year - is a partnership between the State Library of Queensland, Telstra, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, and Queensland Public Libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres. Training is delivered by experienced facilitators, with all the necessary technology provided for the sessions.

Minister for Seniors Coralee O’Rourke said the Tech Savvy Seniors program demonstrates the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to improving the lives of older Queenslanders by bridging the digital divide.

“While digital literacy is steadily increasing across the state, Queensland’s over 65 population is one of the groups who are the least digitally included and are at risk of being left behind,” she said.

“As more and more government and essential services move online, strengthening the digital literacy of seniors will better facilitate their access to information and provide them with the confidence and skills they need to embrace digital services.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the community response to the program previously was overwhelming and this year’s program is proving to be just as popular.

“The feedback we’ve received about Tech Savvy Seniors has been incredibly positive which demonstrates the demand among seniors to stay connected and up-to-date,” she said.

“From online grocery orders to connecting with children or grandchildren, the program aims to deliver tangible, often life-changing outcomes for older Queenslanders. It is wonderful to see how these services are making such a positive impact on the participants’ lives.”

Telstra’s General Manager for Digital Inclusion, Nancie-Lee Robinson, said Tech Savvy Seniors is part of Telstra’s commitment to helping all Australians enjoy the benefits of being connected and engaged with digital technology.

“Telstra’s 2017 Australian Digital Inclusion Index research found Queensland seniors, or those aged over 65, are our most digitally excluded group. Tech Savvy Seniors is a way to help address that,” Ms Robinson said.

“Digital technology can help break down social barriers, create efficiencies, and open up new learning and engagement opportunities for Queenslanders in their golden years.”

Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland 2017-2018 participating library services and Indigenous Knowledge Centres: Brisbane City Council, Bundaberg Regional Council, Burdekin Shire Council, Cassowary Coast Regional Council, Central Highlands Regional Council, Charters Towers Regional Council, Cherbourg Aboriginal Shire Council, Cook Shire Council, Douglas Shire Council, Fraser Coast Regional Council, Gold Coast City Council, Goondiwindi Regional Council, Gympie Regional Council, Ipswich City Council, Livingstone Shire Council, Lockhart River Aboriginal Shire Council, Lockyer Valley Regional Council, Logan City Council, Maranoa Regional Council, Moreton Bay Regional Council, Mount Isa City Council, Noosa Shire Council, North Burnett Regional Council, Rockhampton Regional Council, Scenic Rim Regional Council, Southern Downs Regional Council, Sunshine Coast Regional Council, Toowoomba Regional Council, Western Downs Regional Council and Whitsunday Regional Council.

For further information about the Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland Initiative, visit www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/programs.


Minister Enoch - 0412 393 909
State Library of Queensland - Kylie Roots, communications@slq.qld.gov.au, 07 3842 9847

14 Aug 2017

Treasures from the First World War come to Mackay

Treasures from the First World War come to Mackay

Cholera belts, cardigans and a curious offering of 31 Nightingales were all shipped off to European battlefields thanks to the people of Mackay during the First World War, according to a State Library of Queensland (SLQ) expert visiting the city on 22 August.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the shipments, which included a wrap for wounded soldiers known as a Nightingale, were catalogued in Red Cross magazines and helped to detail Mackay’s contribution to the war effort.

These 100-year-old magazines, along with precious letters, diaries and photographs will be on display at Dudley Denny City Library as part of a free white gloves interactive experience hosted by State Library.

Mr Elvery said the white gloves experience allowed people to get up close and personal with a carefully curated selection of treasures from the Mackay area including the Red Cross magazine and the Fudge diaries.

Louis Fudge, a former Mirani State School student and locomotive driver, fought in the war and kept meticulous notes of his activities in a series of diaries for his wife Nell back home.

In the first diary Louis wrote: “To My Dear Wife Nell, As the censor has access to all letters I intend in this, and perhaps other books, to give you, in the form of a diary, as it were, a rather full account of our doings”.

The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

Where: Dudley Denny City Library
When: Wednesday 22 August  
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm
Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm
Free, bookings required mailto:localhistory@mackay.qld.gov.au or 07 4961 9387

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

25 Jul 2017

Indigenous students to uncover forgotten WWI history at State Library of Queensland

Indigenous students to uncover forgotten WWI history at State Library of Queensland

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander soldiers in the First World War saw foreign battlefields as a chance to secure decent wages and escape segregation and discrimination back home, according to Indigenous students taking part in a special State Library of Queensland workshop on 31 July.

Twenty-four students in Years 9 to12, from Cloncurry to the Gold Coast, will sift through State Library’s century-old letters, diaries and photos to uncover long forgotten stories of Indigenous bravery.

The two-day workshop is part of the Department of Education and Training’s Anzac Indigenous Cultural Study Tour and Indigenous Student Ambassador Network Leadership Camp which encourages students to better understand the contribution of Indigenous service personnel to the Anzac legacy and share their knowledge with others.

The five major prize winners of the study tour will also visit key sites and memorials in Canberra and New Zealand in September.

Sophie Thorne-Saffy, who is an Indigenous student leader in Year 11 at Charleville State High School, believes many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders felt safer on foreign battlefields than in their own country.

“They weren’t treated equally at home so going to fight was like a safe place for them; they were away from all the segregation and racism they had to suffer through most of their lives.” Sophie said.

“They needed an escape from the torture they lived through (in Australia).”

“Many saw that going into the defence force was going to help people see them as citizens and help push for the respect they wanted and also needed,” Sophie said.

More than 1,250 Indigenous Australians enlisted in the First World War, with around 300 from Queensland.

However, at the start of the conflict, The Protection of Aborigines Act, Queensland (1897) made enlistment impossible. The Act denied Indigenous people the basic rights of citizenship, and restricted their movements and activities.

Despite this prohibition, Indigenous men still tried to enlist from 1914. Many travelled hundreds of miles to try their luck at recruiting centres far away from their communities, if they had been rejected closer to home. Others with mixed parentage scraped through by claiming foreign nationality.

In May 1917, the Australian Government relaxed the rules around Indigenous enlistment following heavy losses on the Western Front.

The student workshop is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program which is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

20 Jul 2017

Rockhampton print house honoured with Queensland business history award

Rockhampton print house honoured with Queensland business history award

Fourth-generation family business City Printing Works received the 2017 Queensland Business History Award at tonight’s Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame induction dinner.

City Printing Works was established in 1903 by Andrew (Lofty) Anderson after he arrived in Rockhampton with his family and a second-hand printing press in tow.

The company produced The Critic, a weekly social justice paper covering politics and sport, sold around Rockhampton and Mount Morgan for a penny.

With an initial print run of 2,500 copies, production expanded rapidly before the Great Depression forced the paper’s closure in 1931.

However, the company’s printing division endured, with the Andersons adapting the focus of their business to include a variety of printed material for the local community including tags for the local butchers, cake labels, and stickers for soft drink bottles.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald commended City Printing Works for its outstanding efforts over the years to preserve and make available its business history and artefacts.

“The Queensland Business History Award, part of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, recognises leadership in collecting, preserving and sharing corporate history and heritage collections,” Ms McDonald said.

Ms McDonald said that the Anderson family kept samples of their work over decades, which ensured historical items and business records have been archived and preserved.

“City Printing Works’ collection of printed material has been carefully stored, or is displayed in glass cabinets or frames in its modern-day office, which has not only has meant these heritage items have stood the test of time, but they are available for people today to view and learn from,” Ms McDonald said.

“And because City Printing Works has remained an Anderson family business since 1903, a lot of inherited knowledge and stories have been passed through the generations.”

An extensive collection of historical items and documents from City Printing Works are housed at the Rockhampton Heritage Village in a purpose-built print house replica, including hot metal typesetting machines and presses (a Miehle Vertical (1933), a Thompson Platen and a Heidelberg Platen), cardboard tags, labels, pamphlets, stickers, newsletters, posters and more.

City Printing Works also shares examples of historical work through Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and its website.

Ms McDonald said State Library of Queensland, as a state collector of Queensland’s history, valued the significant contribution City Printing Works has made to preserving local stories.

“These items have a lot of character — whether it’s a label that was printed for the local butcher, or a theatre program — and paint a picture of Rockhampton’s community and history over a more than one hundred year period, capturing fascinating memories and stories that help us understand what life has been like,” Ms McDonald said.

“State Library is committed to preserving Queensland’s memory and ensuring it is accessible now and for generations to come, and City Printing Works has done a remarkable job of adding their piece to Queensland’s collective story.”

Founded in 2009 by State Library of Queensland, Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School, the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame recognises the significant contributions by leading businesses and individuals to Queensland’s economic and social development.

For more information on the award and the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, visit leaders.slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries:

SLQ Communications

communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

18 Jul 2017

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Just days after Townsville residents Annie and Duncan Baxter learned their son Neil had died at Gallipoli they received a letter from him in the post.

It was full of youthful bravado and attempts to quell family anxiety back home and a heartbreaking reminder of all that they had lost.

From 26 – 28 July CityLibraries Thuringowa will host a free white gloves interactive experience with First World War treasures from State Library of Queensland (SLQ) such as letters, diaries and photographs.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the white gloves experience allows people to get close and personal with a curated selection of First World War treasures such as letters, diaries and photographs.

The Baxter’s story is one of a number of local Townsville stories that have been carefully curated for the city’s white gloves experience.

State Library will also be holding a workshop to show residents and visitors how to care for their own World War items and heritage organisations will also have the opportunity to learn how to promote and share collections online.

Mr Elvery said the Baxter story was a poignant example of the losses many Townsville families endured during wartime.

In the Baxter’s ill-fated letter Neil wrote: "We expect to be in action before many days are over—the sooner the better, as we are all anxious to have a 'go,' and I think the Australians will make a name for themselves."

“The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War,” Mr Elvery said.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, as part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Where: CityLibraries Thuringowa
Free, bookings required: (07) 4727 8310
When: Wednesday 26 July
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm   Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm

Links: whatson.Townsville, slq website

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

3 Jul 2017

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Ministerial statement

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch today (Monday) announced Queensland’s remote and regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will receive digital literacy training.

Speaking during NAIDOC Week celebrations, Ms Enoch said the new Deadly Digital Communities program will be delivered through the State Library of Queensland, Telstra and local councils.

Ms Enoch said the program will see community based training and professional development delivered to 26 regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Queensland.

“This is a huge step towards closing the gap and improving the digital inclusion of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Ms Enoch said.

“It is programs like this that boost our state’s entrepreneurial culture, by giving all Queenslanders the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer Tim O’Leary said the company was committed to working with organisations such as the State Library of Queensland to improve digital inclusion across Queensland.

“As more and more services and daily interactions move online, being able to use digital technologies brings vital health, social and financial benefits – especially for Indigenous people in remote locations,” Mr O’Leary said.

“We believe digital literacy has become an essential skill in the digital age. At Telstra, we want to see all Australians connect, participate and interact in the digital world, irrespective of where they live. This is what this initiative is all about.”

Mr O’Leary said Telstra had expanded its network coverage to rural locations such as Aurukun and Burketown over the last few months, and that this project was another example of Telstra’s ability to work with the government to deliver innovative programs to regional and rural Australia.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said Deadly Digital Communities was indicative of the innovative programs the State Library delivered in collaboration with public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres throughout Queensland.

“Deadly Digital Communities will help realise the often untapped potential of these unique and vibrant communities,” she said.
“Participants will learn about everything from sending an email to using social media to connect with family or to promote a business idea.”

Ms McDonald said digital inclusion was vital in helping communities reap the immense social and economic benefits of the digital world.

Deadly Digital Communities will commence in September and will roll out over two years to the communities of Aurukun, Cherbourg, Hope Vale, Lockhart River, Palm Island, Pormpuraaw, Wujal Wujal, Woorabinda, Bamaga, Injinoo, New Mapoon, Seisia and Umagico.

Another 13 Indigenous Knowledge Centres and remote public libraries will soon be added to the program.

Deadly Digital Communities is an initiative of the State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

MEDIA
Minister Enoch: 0412 393 909
State Library of Queensland - Kylie Roots, communications@slq.qld.gov.au, 07 3842 9847
Telstra – Anna Erbrederis anna.erbrederis@team.telstra.com, 03 9240 9478

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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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