Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

15 Mar 2017

Asia Pacific Architecture Forum returns to Brisbane

Asia Pacific Architecture Forum returns to Brisbane

The 2017 Asia Pacific Architecture Forum will be held in Brisbane from 18-31 March and is an initiative of Architecture Media and State Library of Queensland.

A highlight of the program for the 2017 Asia Pacific Architecture Forum is the keynote address of the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, a Pritzker Architecture Prize recipient.

The program will feature a range of free and ticketed events, including exhibitions, installations, symposia, lectures and workshops, which will engage architecture and design professionals, educators, enthusiasts, children and young people. Shigeru Ban will present his innovative and humanitarian architecture at the day-long ArchitectureAP Symposium on Friday 24 March 2017 at State Library of Queensland.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the two week program will showcase architecture’s pivotal role in the culture, sustainability and economy of the Asia Pacific region.

“State Library, through the Asia Pacific Design Library, is pleased to continue our partnership with Architecture Media to deliver this vibrant program of exhibitions and events, which shines the spotlight on the importance of architecture in our region.

“We are delighted that the Forum has become a vehicle for attracting high calibre international architects and designers to State Library. We are excited to again host this world class event and facilitate the critical discussions occurring in contemporary architecture,” Ms McDonald said.

Architecture Media’s Editorial Director Cameron Bruhn said that the Forum will present information that will enable architects, designers and planners to tackle the challenges of designing for future growth in the Asia Pacific region.

“The Forum’s founding partners, Architecture Media and State Library of Queensland, are working collaboratively with business, government and cultural institutions from across the region to explore and celebrate the innovative thinking and transformative projects creating new world cities for the emerging Asian century,” Mr Bruhn said.

Highlights of the 2017 Forum include: the ArchitectureAP Symposium, a conference featuring internationally renowned speakers; a Design Minds workshop; a free Little Designers architecture workshop; the UQ Architecture lecture series, featuring leading local, national and international architects; a Pecha Kucha night and many more.

For more information including the full program and booking details, visit aparchitectureforum.com.

For all Queensland media enquires please contact Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications:
communications@slq.qld.gov.au 07 3842 9084

15 Mar 2017

Queensland Literary Awards welcomes innovative digital literature prize in 2017

Queensland Literary Awards welcomes innovative digital literature prize in 2017

The Queensland Literary Awards today welcomes a new prize in 2017, celebrating digital literature in all forms.

Showcasing narrative innovation and new practice in contemporary literature by Australian writers, the QUT Digital Literature Award is an exciting new award that supports Queensland’s continued growth in the digital space.

Premier and Minister for the Arts Annastacia Palaszczuk welcomed the addition of a new digital literature award to the Queensland Literary Awards, which recognise outstanding writers, celebrate our stories and foster the next generation of writing talent across all literary genres and platforms.

“This new award recognises that increasingly our stories are not only told through the printed page, but are also published digitally, and read on our screens and devices.”

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch highlighted the importance of the award in showcasing innovation in publishing.

“Queensland is one of the global centres of innovation in digital writing and publishing, making this new prize a perfect addition to the major literary awards of our state,” Ms Enoch said.

“Digital media has given rise to new ways of telling stories and new devices through which readers can explore and fall in love with literature.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said State Library of Queensland is proud to present the Queensland Literary Awards, and thanked the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) for its generous sponsorship of this new award.

“Through QUT’s support, a cash prize of $10,000 has established the QUT Digital Literature Award as the world’s richest digital literary prize,” Ms McDonald said.

“In an increasingly digital world, State Library is focussed on enabling and supporting access to Queensland’s important stories of fact and fiction, both online as well as through the physical artefact.

“The QUT Digital Literature Award was established by State Library of Queensland to acknowledge contemporary publishing and digital innovation in storytelling.

“The Queensland Literary Awards demonstrate the strength of writing and publishing in Australia, and help to uncover and recognise the depth of creative talent we nurture here in Queensland.

“Queensland has always been home to a vibrant and passionate literary community and we are proud to continue supporting writing, publishing and reading, both in print and online,” Ms McDonald said.

The new annual award was announced today as part of the 2017 program for the Queensland Literary Awards, which will open for entries on 1 April.

The Queensland Literary Awards are presented by State Library of Queensland, and offer prizes for writers in thirteen categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry for published and unpublished work.

The Queensland Literary Awards are supported by the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, The University of Southern Queensland, QUT, Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail.

Full guidelines and entry details for all categories of the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards, including the new award, are available now at qldliteraryawards.org.au/about/guidelines. Entries open at 9am on Saturday 1 April.

Media contact
Shahedah Sabdia
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9084

25 Jan 2017

State Library offers research fellowships and residency totalling $110,000

State Library offers research fellowships and residency totalling $110,000

Applications are now open nationwide for State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) annual research fellowships and residency, worth up to $20,000 each.

Applicants are encouraged to explore the state’s documentary heritage, with seven opportunities totalling $110,000 as part of the Queensland Memory Awards.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the fellowships and residency allow Queensland’s diverse stories to be discovered, shared and preserved.

“Our collective stories stretch back more than 40,000 years and there is still so much to uncover about our state’s heritage, culture, places and people,” Ms Enoch said.

“Discovering and sharing these stories is key to enriching our understanding of Queensland — past and present. The Palaszczuk Government is proud to be supporting these awards and encouraging the creation and sharing of new knowledge.”  

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that as the primary custodian of Queensland’s memory, the aim of the fellowship and residency program is to encourage diverse voices and new ways of interpreting collections. 

“The fellowships and residency are open to all, from researchers and academics, to artists, writers, musicians and more,” Ms McDonald said.

“In working closely with the library, fellows and residents bring SLQ’s rich and varied collections to life. Their research inspires us to think differently about our past, present and future.”  

The 2017 fellowships and residency are:

John Oxley Library Fellowship ($20,000 plus 12 months personal work space) — awarded to support a research project that uses the resources of the John Oxley Library.

This fellowship is made possible through the generous donations to the Queensland Library Foundation.

Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship ($15,000 plus six months personal work space) — awarded to support a research project that contributes to new knowledge of Queensland’s economic and/or business history.

This fellowship is an initiative of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, a partnership between SLQ, The Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School.

Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation, four fellowships, including one digital fellowship ($15,000 each plus 12 months personal work space) — to recognise and encourage new research and interpretations about Queensland’s involvement in the First World War or in any significant military campaign over the last 100 years.

The Q ANZAC 100 digital fellowship calls for applications that will develop a creative digital experience using digital content from SLQ and other collecting institutions. These fellowships are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and are proudly sponsored by the Queensland Government.


Mittelheuser Scholar-in-Residence ($15,000 plus broader collaborative experiences with peers based at other Queensland cultural and educational institutions) — to attract leading thinkers who will stimulate intellectual debate and give rise to innovative new services and strategies both within SLQ and more broadly throughout the cultural sector.

This residency is generously funded by Dr Cathryn Mittelheuser AM through the Queensland Library Foundation.

SLQ is hosting a Q ANZAC 100 Fellows talk with past fellowship recipients on Tuesday 28 February as well as a fellowship information and showcase night on the Thursday 9 March.

Applications for all fellowships and residencies open Wednesday 25 January and close Wednesday 29 March.

To submit an application, or for more information on any of the Queensland Memory fellowships and residency, please visit slq.qld.gov.au

The winners will be announced on Thursday 1 June in the lead up to Queensland Week at the annual Queensland Memory Awards ceremony at SLQ.

For further media information and images please contact:
Hillary Bell | 07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

3 Jan 2017

Free and fun holiday activities at State Library of Queensland

Free and fun holiday activities at State Library of Queensland

Visit State Library of Queensland (SLQ) these summer holidays and step into a world of imagination, storytelling and creative play for children, friends and families.

Inspired by The Children Who Loved Books by Queensland author and illustrator Peter Carnavas, the Knowledge Walk has been transformed with a vibrant pop-up play area and storytelling tent.

The 2017 program features craft activities, storytelling sessions with guest Queensland authors, family movie screenings, musical workshops, and more.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the summer holiday program for children is always a highlight on the SLQ calendar.

“It’s incredible to see the library come alive with children and families over the holiday period, sharing time together playing and learning,” Ms McDonald said.

“This year, our program is dedicated to celebrating the wonder of picture books and bringing stories and characters to life.”

“We invite families to come and spend some time at SLQ these school holidays — whether you drop by for the morning or stay the whole day — and help children build a love of reading and literature from a young age,” Ms McDonald said.

Queensland authors Peter Carnavas, Shannon Horsfall, Andrew King, Kate Knapp, and Christine Sharp will visit SLQ during January to host free storytelling sessions in the Knowledge Walk.

Children can also get moving and grooving in free musical sessions with Tim Jackman, Queensland author Chris Collin and his whacky puppet friend Funky Chicken, and the Junk Orchestra.

PROGAM: Summer holiday fun activities at State Library of Queensland
Until 20 Jan | Throughout SLQ | For children of all ages | Free | slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

  • Books and beats on the Queensland Terrace:
    • Junk Orchestra: Mondays and Thursdays, 5–20 Jan, 10am–11am & 12noon–1pm
    • Hickory Dickory Rock with Tim Jackman: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 3–20 Jan, 11am–12noon & 1pm–2pm
    • Funky Chicken — Chooks in Space with Chris Collin: 4 & 18 Jan, 10am–11am & 12noon–1pm
  • Free craft creation station:
    • Open daily from 10am–3pm  in the Knowledge Walk, level 1
    • Activities will change throughout January
    • Materials created by Queensland authors and illustrators Peter Carnavas, Shannon Horsfall, Kate Knapp, Lucia Masciullo and Christine Sharp
  • Free family film screenings:
    • Daily until 20 Jan, 10.30am–12noon & 1.30pm–3pm in SLQ Auditorium 2, level 2
  • Free guided play workshops in the Imagination Playscape:
    • Daily until 20 Jan, 10am–11am in The Parlour, level 1
    • Bookings slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on
  • Storytime in the Storytent:
    • Daily until 20 Jan, 10am–10.30am, 11.30am–12noon, 1pm–1.30pm in the Knowledge Walk, level 1
    • Guest author storytelling sessions:
      • Shannon Horsfall (Was Not Me): 3, 10 & 17 Jan
      • Andrew King (Engibear’s Dream and Engibear’s Bridge): 4 & 6 Jan
      • Christine Sharp (Bea and Sylvia): 11 Jan
      • Peter Carnavas (Blue Whale Blues, The Children Who Loved Books and The Last Tree in the City): 13 & 20 Jan
      • Kate Knapp (Ruby Red Shoes): 16 & 18 Jan

SLQ’s summer Story Lab paid workshops are also running until 20 January.

For older children, SLQ leads the free Summer Reading Club, delivered nationally through public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres and online at summerreadingclub.org.au until 31 January.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for more information and to view the full summer holiday program, or check out the daily calendar to plan your visit.

Media enquiries
Melanie Pennisi, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

1 Dec 2016

Be a holiday hero with the Summer Reading Club

Be a holiday hero with the Summer Reading Club

Unleash your imagination these school holidays with the annual Summer Reading Club, kicking off today online and in 1,082 public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres across the country.

Created for children and young people aged 6 to 17, the Summer Reading Club is a free national program led by State Library of Queensland (SLQ) designed to instil a love of libraries and reading.

This year’s theme, Heroes and Villains, allows participants to explore the conventions associated with super and everyday heroes — and their villainous counterparts — through a range of exciting interactive reading activities and games.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said it was important to keep young minds switched on over the summer holiday period.

“The Summer Reading Club supports continued literacy development in reading, writing, creative arts and digital technology skills through fun learning activities,” Ms Enoch said.

“Reading stories broadens our understanding and stimulates creative thinking by inviting us into new worlds and sharing different perspectives.”

“Stories have the power to help children develop ideas and imagine what might be possible – exactly what we want for our entrepreneurs of tomorrow,” she said.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the Summer Reading Club was an engaging way for libraries to combat the learning loss often experienced by children over the long summer holiday period.

“The Summer Reading Club helps ignite the learning habit, encouraging children to read for pleasure and create, even while they’re not at school,” Ms McDonald said.

The Heroes and Villains theme will see participants exploring a range of genres including myths and legends, speculative fiction, fantasy fiction, and wuxia, a genre of Chinese fiction concerning the adventures of martial artists in ancient China.

“This year club members will explore the concepts of right and wrong, power and responsibility, and self-control and self-mastery by engaging with a variety of traditional and non-traditional heroes and heroines through fun activities online and in local libraries,” Ms McDonald said.

Participants can blog with Australian Children’s Laureate Leigh Hobbs and popular children’s author Deborah Abela, search for answers to Encyclopaedia Britannica’s sponsored quiz, craft a ‘what happens next’ story ending to Mick Elliot’s story starter, share book raves and artwork, win great prizes, and lots more.

“Summer Reading Club members can also meet 21 new Australian authors and illustrators online, read their helpful creative hints and tips and preview their newly release titles,” Ms McDonald said.

“SLQ is delighted to champion this fantastic program again in 2016.”

More than 48,000 children registered with the Summer Reading Club in 2015, reading around 333,000 books last summer.

To join the Club, register online at summerreadingclub.org.au or visit your local public library or Indigenous Knowledge Centre.

The Summer Reading Club is delivered in partnership with the Australian Library and Information Association and the Australian Public Library Alliance.

Summer Reading Club
1 December 2016 – 31 January 2017
Join at your local public library or participate online at summerreadingclub.org.au

Media enquiries:
Melanie Pennisi, SLQ Communications | communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 3842 9847

15 Nov 2016

Celebrate Indigenous culture and community at State Library

Celebrate Indigenous culture and community at State Library

Indigenous artistic practices and culture will be celebrated this Friday with workshops, performances and festivities at State Library of Queensland (SLQ).

This event closes the Art of the Skins exhibition program which is part of ongoing project revitalising the Aboriginal cultural practice of possum skin cloak making in south-east Queensland.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the project is one of Queensland’s most significant cultural resurgence projects.

Art of the Skins has not only contributed to Aboriginal cultural revitalisation in south-east Queensland, but has created new histories of our state which will be preserved for, and shared with future Queenslanders,” Ms McDonald said.

“We invite all members of the community for their last chance to see this unique exhibition and participate in a day of events to learn, share skills and stories, and to experience the remarkable legacy of Art of the Skins.”

At the closing celebration Indigenous artists will host special workshops inspired by Aboriginal cultural traditions.

Everyone is invited to participate in workshops to learn traditional rope making and weaving using natural fibres, or create a possum skin wristband (bookings required, $10 per person).

Facilitators include Carol McGregor and Glennys Briggs, lead artists for Art of the Skins, and leaders in the field of possum skin cloak making and its history.

In the evening the exhibition gallery space will feature free performances of spoken poetry, contemporary dance and live music.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for the full day’s program and to make a booking for the workshops.

Art of the Skins began in June 2015 with community consultation in Brisbane, Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast, culminating in the production of six possum skin cloaks representing the Aboriginal communities and individuals by whom they were created.

The exhibition is open at SLQ, South Bank until Sunday 20 November, with the ongoing online showcase available at slq.qld.gov.au/showcase/artoftheskins.

The Queensland College of Art and the Griffith Centre for Creative Arts Research provided sponsorship for a commemorative Art of the Skins catalogue for exhibition contributors and artists.

Possum skins used in the project are legally and ethically sourced from New Zealand.

Media enquiries
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9084

10 Nov 2016

State Library digitises soldier portraits in time for Remembrance Day

State Library digitises soldier portraits in time for Remembrance Day

Digital portraits of nearly 30,000 Queensland soldiers who served in the First World War are now able to be searched online as part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the soldier portraits are an incredible digital resource for anyone interested in the First World War and Queensland history.

“These nearly 30,000 portraits are freely available for people to view, comment on and download as high resolution image files,” Ms Enoch said.

“Now that these photographs have been digitised and linked to war service records, we have a uniquely discoverable and usable resource available online for current and future generations.”

Captain Andrew Craig RAN (Retd), Chair of the Queensland Advisory Committee for the Commemoration of the Anzac Centenary said the innovative state-wide initiative demonstrates the importance of creating a digital legacy for current and future generations.

“Embracing 21st century technology has made it easier than ever for the public to understand and discover more about those Queenslanders who served in the First World War and their experiences.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the digitisation of the soldier portraits was an important commemorative resource, particularly in the lead up to significant occasions such as Remembrance Day.

“The digitisation of the soldier portraits will contribute to developing a lasting First World War legacy while furthering our understanding of Queensland’s involvement in and experiences during the war years,” Ms McDonald said.

“We’ve had feedback from people who have used the resource, telling us that this is the first time they’ve been able to see photographs of their family members.”

“The soldier portraits represent almost 30,000 unique Queensland stories; stories of husbands, fathers, sons, friends and brothers. This is a powerful resource and one which truly serves to commemorate those who fought and sacrificed during the war.”

In order to digitise, describe and make accessible such a vast collection of portraits and information, SLQ staff worked with a team of 30 tireless volunteers who have donated their time to help complete this project. Planning for the digitisation project commenced in late 2013, with the final soldier portrait being made available online in September 2016.

In September 1914, Talma Studios and Fegan Studios set up tents in the soldier’s camp at Enoggera to take photographs of soldiers in uniform for publication in the Pictorial Supplement of The Queenslander newspaper, a weekly summary and literary edition of the Brisbane Courier (now The Courier-Mail).

The portraits continued to be published in The Queenslander until the war ended in 1918. There would eventually be nearly 30,000 photographs captured of young men about to enter war (around half the number of Queenslanders who served in the First World War).

Throughout the war years, The Queenslander was regularly filled with pages of soldier portraits, as well as photographs from the war and the home fronts, depicting all aspects of life in Queensland.

This large collection of photographs enabled The Queenslander to promptly publish portraits as soon as casualty lists were issued. Photos were re-published as reports of wounded or missing soldiers were received and again as pages were created as a Roll of Honour.

SLQ has now digitised all of the soldier portraits which can be accessed and downloaded through the One Search catalogue. Where possible, each soldier portrait has been linked to their war service record on the National Archives of Australia’s Discovering Anzacs website.

Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | 07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au
State Library of Queensland Communications

For more information visit
http://qanzac100.slq.qld.gov.au/showcase/soldier-portraits

To ‘find your soldier’, visit the One Search catalogue, search for a soldier by surname, include the word ‘soldiers’ in the search terms, and limit the search to ‘SLQ Digitised Collections’.

1 Nov 2016

State Library digitises Bloomfield River history

State Library digitises Bloomfield River history

More than 20 years since they were recorded, the stories of the people living in the Bloomfield River region can now be heard online through State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) catalogue.

In 1995, Bloomfield River resident Camilla Darling conducted numerous interviews with local Kuku Yalanji Elders and non-Indigenous settlers of the Bloomfield Valley to document the rich and varied history of this remote rainforest region in Far North Queensland.

The 39 interviews reveal the way of life of the subjects and their families, and speak to the interactions and relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous settlers in Bloomfield prior to, and during, missionary involvement.

Capturing stories of residents who have lived in the region since the 1940s and 1950s, as well as residents with profound knowledge of the history of Bloomfield from the 1800s, the oral histories collection is a comprehensive view of the area’s fascinating past and heritage.

Some stories capture the culture of Elders, which have eroded through time, especially since white settlement. Other stories reflect on the tin mining and timber industries, which were the two major industries on the Bloomfield, but have long since ceased.

Over an 18 month period, SLQ reformatted the original audio cassette recordings of the interviews to a digital format to make this collection of unique oral histories accessible to all, including the descendants and families of the interviewees.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the Bloomfield River oral histories amount to a powerful collection of memories of a community that spans from the time of Captain Cook.

“This oral histories collection is important as it offers a powerful view of the diversity and history of Queensland, and through its recent digitisation, is now easily accessible for all,” Ms Enoch said.

“Bloomfield River is a true microcosm which highlights our varying ways of life and plays an important part in our understanding of this state’s rich history.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the digitisation of this collection is significant as it offers a comprehensive view of one of Queensland’s most interesting communities.

“Oral histories are often very narrow in focus but this collection is vast and sweeping, describing how this unique Far North Queensland community survived and thrived,” Ms McDonald said.

“Now, after an extensive digitisation process, these voices and stories can be shared with surviving family members, the wider community, and future generations.”

“It is often peoples’ stories, rather than objects or facts, that really brings history to life and this oral histories collection does just that.”

Digitised photographs and a digitised hand drawn map of the Bloomfield River region are included with the oral histories collection online, and transcriptions of all recordings are currently in progress.

Media enquiries
Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications | communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9864

9 Sep 2016

2016 Queensland Literary Awards finalists announced

2016 Queensland Literary Awards finalists announced

59 authors have been shortlisted across 12 categories as the 2016 Queensland Literary Awards recognises the achievements of Australian writers.

State Library of Queensland supports and champions the Queensland Literary Awards in nurturing a culture of reading, writing and ideas and celebrating the incredible strength and diversity in Australian writing talent.

State Librarian and CEO, Ms Vicki McDonald today announced the 2016 Queensland Literary Awards (QLA) shortlists.

“From well-known authors such as Matthew Condon and Tim Winton, to talented debut novelists like Sonja Dechian, the Queensland Literary Awards continue to highlight the high calibre of literature across Australia,” Ms McDonald said.

“With such a rich field of nominations across all the 2016 QLA categories, I thank the judges for what could only have been an extremely challenging task in determining the shortlists.”

Queensland Premier and Arts Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said the Queensland Literary Awards recognised outstanding writers, celebrated Queensland stories and fostered the next generation of writing talent.

“Last year, my Government reinstated funding for these prestigious awards and also established two new awards, one for a work of State significance and the Young Publishers and Writers Awards, to recognise important Queensland voices,” the Premier said.

“In 2016, the Queensland Government continues to match the sponsor and partnership funding in ten award categories with the aim to expand the awards and attract additional sponsors.”

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the power of seeing Australian life represented in the books we read cannot be overstated.

“These are our stories,” Ms Enoch said. “They lay bare every aspect of contemporary Australian life, help us to understand our history and set the path forward for our future.”

In addition to the 12 categories of the Queensland Literary Awards, three Queensland Writers Fellowships will be awarded to provide support for Queensland authors in developing their work for publication.

Queensland readers have the power to pick the winner of The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year category. Readers can vote for their favourite shortlisted book before Thursday 29 September 2016 by visiting qldliteraryawards.org.au.

In announcing the shortlists, Ms McDonald said the continued support for the Queensland Literary Awards from authors, booksellers, publishers and the literary community was outstanding.

“We are grateful for the continued support of our partners including the University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, Claire Booth, the Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail,” Ms McDonald said.

The award winners and fellowship recipients will be announced at a special awards ceremony held at State Library of Queensland on 5 October.

The shortlists can be found at qldliteraryawards.org.au.

The 2016 Queensland Literary Award categories are:

  • Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance
  • Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards
  • University of Queensland Fiction Book Award
  • University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award
  • Griffith University Young Adult Book Award
  • Griffith University Children’s Book Award
  • University of Southern Queensland History Book Award
  • University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award
  • State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award
  • Unpublished Indigenous Writer - David Unaipon Award (supported by the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund and University of Queensland Press)
  • Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award (supported by University of Queensland Press)
  • The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book for the Year

Media enquiries:
Kate Allen, SLQ Communications
07 3840 7897 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

2016 Queensland Literary Awards shortlist

Queensland Premier’s Award for a Published Work of State Significance ($25,000)

  • Remotely Fashionable: A Story of Subtropical Style, Nadia Buick & Madeleine King
  • All Fall Down, Matthew Condon
  • Wasted: A Story of Alcohol, Grief and a Death in Brisbane, Elspeth Muir
  • The Long Goodbye, P.J. Parker
  • Not Just Black and White, Lesley and Tammy Williams

Queensland Premier's Young Publishers and Writers Awards ($10,000*)

  • Emily Craven
  • Sam George-Allen
  • Anna Jacobson
  • Michelle Law
  • Andrew McMillen

*Winners of this award also receive $2,500 each worth of professional development

University of Queensland Fiction Book Award ($10,000)

  • Ghost River, Tony Birch
  • Between a Wolf and A Dog, Georgia Blain
  • The Midnight Watch, David Dyer
  • One, Patrick Holland
  • The Natural Way of Things, Charlotte Wood

University of Queensland Non-Fiction Book Award ($10,000)

  • Offshore: Behind the Wire on Manus and Nauru, Madeline Gleeson
  • Talking to My Country, Stan Grant
  • Second Half First, Drusilla Modjeska
  • Island Home, Tim Winton
  • Small Acts of Disappearance: Essays on Hunger, Fiona Wright

Griffith University Young Adult Book Award ($10,000)

  • The Sidekicks, Will Kostakis
  • Dreaming the Enemy, David Metzenthen
  • The Stars at October Bend, Glenda Millard
  • One Thousand Hills, James Roy and Noël Zihabamwe
  • One Would Think the Deep, Claire Zorn

Griffith University Children’s Book Award ($10,000)

  • Suri’s Wall, Lucy Estela & Matt Ottley
  • How the Sun Got to Coco’s House, Bob Graham
  • Incredibilia, Libby Hathorn & Gaye Chapman
  • KidGlovz, Julie Hunt & Dale Newman
  • Me, Teddy, Chris McKimmie

University of Southern Queensland History Book Award ($10,000)

  • Armenia, Australia and the Great War, Vicken Babkenien & Peter Stanley
  • Australia’s Boldest Experiment, Stuart Macintyre
  • The Pearl Frontier: Indonesian Labor and Indigenous Encounters in Australia’s Northern Trading Network, Julia Martinez and Adrian Vickers
  • Unseen Anzac, Jeff Maynard
  • The oldest foods on earth, John Newton
  • Gay Sydney, Garry Wotherspoon

University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award ($10,000)

  • Six Bedrooms, Tegan Bennett Daylight
  • An Astronaut’s Life, Sonja Dechian
  • A Few Days in the Country and other stories, Elizabeth Harrower
  • Portable Curiosities, Julie Koh
  • The High Places, Fiona McFarlane

State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award ($10,000)

  • Year of the Wasp, Joel Deane
  • Content, Liam Ferney
  • The Hazards, Sarah Holland-Batt
  • The Anatomy of Voice, David Musgrave
  • Not Fox Nor Axe, Chloe Wilson

Unpublished Indigenous Writer – David Unaipon Award ($10,000)

  • Dancing Home, Paul Collis
  • Song of Jessica, B.A. Quakawoot
  • 67 Days, Yvonne Weldon

Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award ($10,000*)

  • The Boatman, H.E. Crampton
  • The Elements, Laura Elvery

*Finalists of this award receive $3,000 each worth of editorial development, sponsored by Claire Booth

The Courier-Mail People's Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award ($10,000)

  • Remotely Fashionable: A Story of Subtropical Style, Nadia Buick and Madeleine King
  • All Fall Down, Matt Condon
  • Day Boy, Trent Jamieson
  • The Landing, Susan Johnson
  • Swimming Home, Mary-Rose MacColl
  • The Promise Seed, Cass Moriarty
  • Wasted: A Story of Alcohol, Grief and a Death in Brisbane, Elspeth Muir
  • Dying: A Memoir, Cory Taylor (non-fiction)

The winner of The Courier-Mail People's Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award is determined by public vote, which is open from Friday 26 August and closes Monday 26 September 2016. Readers can vote at qldliteraryawards.org.au

29 Aug 2016

Australia’s largest collection of Bee Gees memorabilia comes home to Queensland

Australia’s largest collection of Bee Gees memorabilia comes home to Queensland

The immortality of the Bee Gees lives on at State Library of Queensland thanks to a generous donation to the Queensland Library Foundation (the Foundation).

Secured from a private collector in Melbourne, Victoria, the collection comprises more than 370 items and includes all three Bee Gees Australian releases, scrap books, merchandise and every Australian album cover of Barry Gibb’s 1963–67 songs (bar three records), as well as a hand taped song Barry wrote but never recorded from the same period.

This collection is regarded as Australia’s most comprehensive and significant collection of Bee Gees albums and memorabilia.

“State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is thrilled to have received these materials through the efforts of the Foundation,” State Librarian and CEO Sonia Cooper said.

“This collection will prove an invaluable resource for music historians, researchers and fans alike,” Mrs Cooper said.

“State Library’s music collection is one of our fastest growing reference sections and this acquisition will greatly enhance the library’s content of Queensland music which has influenced the local, national and international music scenes.”

Queensland is where it all started for the trio, with the Gibb brothers signing their first music contract on the kitchen table of their Redcliffe home and playing their first gig, in 1958, at the Redcliffe Speedway.

“The Bee Gees have a remarkable connection to Queensland, so it’s very exciting to receive these artefacts — reflective of an extraordinary Queensland story — to preserve for future generations and share with Queenslanders today,” Mrs Cooper said.

The Queensland Library Foundation will host a special free event on 1 September to celebrate the acquisition with presenter Loretta Ryan, SLQ Music Curator Laurel Dingle, and an open discussion with Brisbane radio announcer of the late 1950s and early 1960s, Bill Gates.

1 September 2016 is a noteworthy day for the Gibb family: it’s the anniversary of the day they arrived in Australia from the UK, the 50th anniversary of the release of the Spicks and Specks album and more significantly, Barry Gibb’s 70th birthday.

Stayin’ Alive: the Bee Gees collection presentation
Thursday 1 September, 6pm–7pm
SLQ Auditorium 2, level 2
Free, bookings required www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct, South Bank
For more information about this event, please contact foundation@slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries:
Communications, State Library of Queensland
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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