Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

14 Aug 2017

Treasures from the First World War come to Mackay

Treasures from the First World War come to Mackay

Cholera belts, cardigans and a curious offering of 31 Nightingales were all shipped off to European battlefields thanks to the people of Mackay during the First World War, according to a State Library of Queensland (SLQ) expert visiting the city on 22 August.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the shipments, which included a wrap for wounded soldiers known as a Nightingale, were catalogued in Red Cross magazines and helped to detail Mackay’s contribution to the war effort.

These 100-year-old magazines, along with precious letters, diaries and photographs will be on display at Dudley Denny City Library as part of a free white gloves interactive experience hosted by State Library.

Mr Elvery said the white gloves experience allowed people to get up close and personal with a carefully curated selection of treasures from the Mackay area including the Red Cross magazine and the Fudge diaries.

Louis Fudge, a former Mirani State School student and locomotive driver, fought in the war and kept meticulous notes of his activities in a series of diaries for his wife Nell back home.

In the first diary Louis wrote: “To My Dear Wife Nell, As the censor has access to all letters I intend in this, and perhaps other books, to give you, in the form of a diary, as it were, a rather full account of our doings”.

The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

Where: Dudley Denny City Library
When: Wednesday 22 August  
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm
Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm
Free, bookings required mailto:localhistory@mackay.qld.gov.au or 07 4961 9387

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

25 Jul 2017

Indigenous students to uncover forgotten WWI history at State Library of Queensland

Indigenous students to uncover forgotten WWI history at State Library of Queensland

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander soldiers in the First World War saw foreign battlefields as a chance to secure decent wages and escape segregation and discrimination back home, according to Indigenous students taking part in a special State Library of Queensland workshop on 31 July.

Twenty-four students in Years 9 to12, from Cloncurry to the Gold Coast, will sift through State Library’s century-old letters, diaries and photos to uncover long forgotten stories of Indigenous bravery.

The two-day workshop is part of the Department of Education and Training’s Anzac Indigenous Cultural Study Tour and Indigenous Student Ambassador Network Leadership Camp which encourages students to better understand the contribution of Indigenous service personnel to the Anzac legacy and share their knowledge with others.

The five major prize winners of the study tour will also visit key sites and memorials in Canberra and New Zealand in September.

Sophie Thorne-Saffy, who is an Indigenous student leader in Year 11 at Charleville State High School, believes many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders felt safer on foreign battlefields than in their own country.

“They weren’t treated equally at home so going to fight was like a safe place for them; they were away from all the segregation and racism they had to suffer through most of their lives.” Sophie said.

“They needed an escape from the torture they lived through (in Australia).”

“Many saw that going into the defence force was going to help people see them as citizens and help push for the respect they wanted and also needed,” Sophie said.

More than 1,250 Indigenous Australians enlisted in the First World War, with around 300 from Queensland.

However, at the start of the conflict, The Protection of Aborigines Act, Queensland (1897) made enlistment impossible. The Act denied Indigenous people the basic rights of citizenship, and restricted their movements and activities.

Despite this prohibition, Indigenous men still tried to enlist from 1914. Many travelled hundreds of miles to try their luck at recruiting centres far away from their communities, if they had been rejected closer to home. Others with mixed parentage scraped through by claiming foreign nationality.

In May 1917, the Australian Government relaxed the rules around Indigenous enlistment following heavy losses on the Western Front.

The student workshop is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program which is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

20 Jul 2017

Rockhampton print house honoured with Queensland business history award

Rockhampton print house honoured with Queensland business history award

Fourth-generation family business City Printing Works received the 2017 Queensland Business History Award at tonight’s Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame induction dinner.

City Printing Works was established in 1903 by Andrew (Lofty) Anderson after he arrived in Rockhampton with his family and a second-hand printing press in tow.

The company produced The Critic, a weekly social justice paper covering politics and sport, sold around Rockhampton and Mount Morgan for a penny.

With an initial print run of 2,500 copies, production expanded rapidly before the Great Depression forced the paper’s closure in 1931.

However, the company’s printing division endured, with the Andersons adapting the focus of their business to include a variety of printed material for the local community including tags for the local butchers, cake labels, and stickers for soft drink bottles.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald commended City Printing Works for its outstanding efforts over the years to preserve and make available its business history and artefacts.

“The Queensland Business History Award, part of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, recognises leadership in collecting, preserving and sharing corporate history and heritage collections,” Ms McDonald said.

Ms McDonald said that the Anderson family kept samples of their work over decades, which ensured historical items and business records have been archived and preserved.

“City Printing Works’ collection of printed material has been carefully stored, or is displayed in glass cabinets or frames in its modern-day office, which has not only has meant these heritage items have stood the test of time, but they are available for people today to view and learn from,” Ms McDonald said.

“And because City Printing Works has remained an Anderson family business since 1903, a lot of inherited knowledge and stories have been passed through the generations.”

An extensive collection of historical items and documents from City Printing Works are housed at the Rockhampton Heritage Village in a purpose-built print house replica, including hot metal typesetting machines and presses (a Miehle Vertical (1933), a Thompson Platen and a Heidelberg Platen), cardboard tags, labels, pamphlets, stickers, newsletters, posters and more.

City Printing Works also shares examples of historical work through Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and its website.

Ms McDonald said State Library of Queensland, as a state collector of Queensland’s history, valued the significant contribution City Printing Works has made to preserving local stories.

“These items have a lot of character — whether it’s a label that was printed for the local butcher, or a theatre program — and paint a picture of Rockhampton’s community and history over a more than one hundred year period, capturing fascinating memories and stories that help us understand what life has been like,” Ms McDonald said.

“State Library is committed to preserving Queensland’s memory and ensuring it is accessible now and for generations to come, and City Printing Works has done a remarkable job of adding their piece to Queensland’s collective story.”

Founded in 2009 by State Library of Queensland, Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School, the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame recognises the significant contributions by leading businesses and individuals to Queensland’s economic and social development.

For more information on the award and the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, visit leaders.slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries:

SLQ Communications

communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

18 Jul 2017

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Just days after Townsville residents Annie and Duncan Baxter learned their son Neil had died at Gallipoli they received a letter from him in the post.

It was full of youthful bravado and attempts to quell family anxiety back home and a heartbreaking reminder of all that they had lost.

From 26 – 28 July CityLibraries Thuringowa will host a free white gloves interactive experience with First World War treasures from State Library of Queensland (SLQ) such as letters, diaries and photographs.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the white gloves experience allows people to get close and personal with a curated selection of First World War treasures such as letters, diaries and photographs.

The Baxter’s story is one of a number of local Townsville stories that have been carefully curated for the city’s white gloves experience.

State Library will also be holding a workshop to show residents and visitors how to care for their own World War items and heritage organisations will also have the opportunity to learn how to promote and share collections online.

Mr Elvery said the Baxter story was a poignant example of the losses many Townsville families endured during wartime.

In the Baxter’s ill-fated letter Neil wrote: "We expect to be in action before many days are over—the sooner the better, as we are all anxious to have a 'go,' and I think the Australians will make a name for themselves."

“The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War,” Mr Elvery said.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, as part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Where: CityLibraries Thuringowa
Free, bookings required: (07) 4727 8310
When: Wednesday 26 July
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm   Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm

Links: whatson.Townsville, slq website

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

3 Jul 2017

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Ministerial statement

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch today (Monday) announced Queensland’s remote and regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will receive digital literacy training.

Speaking during NAIDOC Week celebrations, Ms Enoch said the new Deadly Digital Communities program will be delivered through the State Library of Queensland, Telstra and local councils.

Ms Enoch said the program will see community based training and professional development delivered to 26 regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Queensland.

“This is a huge step towards closing the gap and improving the digital inclusion of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Ms Enoch said.

“It is programs like this that boost our state’s entrepreneurial culture, by giving all Queenslanders the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer Tim O’Leary said the company was committed to working with organisations such as the State Library of Queensland to improve digital inclusion across Queensland.

“As more and more services and daily interactions move online, being able to use digital technologies brings vital health, social and financial benefits – especially for Indigenous people in remote locations,” Mr O’Leary said.

“We believe digital literacy has become an essential skill in the digital age. At Telstra, we want to see all Australians connect, participate and interact in the digital world, irrespective of where they live. This is what this initiative is all about.”

Mr O’Leary said Telstra had expanded its network coverage to rural locations such as Aurukun and Burketown over the last few months, and that this project was another example of Telstra’s ability to work with the government to deliver innovative programs to regional and rural Australia.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said Deadly Digital Communities was indicative of the innovative programs the State Library delivered in collaboration with public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres throughout Queensland.

“Deadly Digital Communities will help realise the often untapped potential of these unique and vibrant communities,” she said.
“Participants will learn about everything from sending an email to using social media to connect with family or to promote a business idea.”

Ms McDonald said digital inclusion was vital in helping communities reap the immense social and economic benefits of the digital world.

Deadly Digital Communities will commence in September and will roll out over two years to the communities of Aurukun, Cherbourg, Hope Vale, Lockhart River, Palm Island, Pormpuraaw, Wujal Wujal, Woorabinda, Bamaga, Injinoo, New Mapoon, Seisia and Umagico.

Another 13 Indigenous Knowledge Centres and remote public libraries will soon be added to the program.

Deadly Digital Communities is an initiative of the State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

MEDIA
Minister Enoch: 0412 393 909
State Library of Queensland - Kylie Roots, communications@slq.qld.gov.au, 07 3842 9847
Telstra – Anna Erbrederis anna.erbrederis@team.telstra.com, 03 9240 9478

1 Jul 2017

$2,000 on offer for Queensland’s next great young writer

$2,000 on offer for Queensland’s next great young writer

Entries are now open for State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) annual Young Writers Award competition, offering $2,000 for the best short story from a young writer.

Now in its 22nd year, the competition aims to launch the careers of the next generation of great Australian writers.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the Young Writers Award has become an integral part of uncovering young, creative writing talent in Queensland.

“State Library’s Young Writers Award has a long history of finding the future stars of Queensland’s writing community and giving them a head-start — from Rebecca Jessen and Chris Somerville to Benjamin Law and Tara June Winch,” Minister Enoch said.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said State Library hoped the competition would continue to foster young writers and introduce them to the publishing industry.

“The Young Writers Award helps writers find their voice, and gives them the confidence to work towards their literary aspirations,” Ms McDonald said.

“In 2017 we are also proud to announce the inaugural Young Writers Conference held at SLQ in November, at which competition entrants and other aspiring young writers will have the opportunity to partake in a full day of skill and knowledge-building workshops, advice and support giving, and networking.”

The 2017 winners of the Young Writers Award will be announced by Minister Enoch at an awards ceremony following the conference.

The competition is open to Queensland residents aged 15 to 25 years into two categories: 15 to 17 years (1,500 words) and 18 to 25 years (2,500 words).

The winner of the 18 to 25 years category receives $2,000 prize money, and the winner of the 15 to 17 years category receives $500.

Runners up and highly commended entrants are also awarded prizes including prize money, gift vouchers and book packs.

All prize winners also receive a membership to Queensland Writers Centre.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/awards for guidelines and entry forms, and to read past winning stories.

Entries close at 5pm on Thursday 31 August.

The Young Writers Award is presented by State Library of Queensland with support from Queensland Writers Centre.

Media enquiries:

Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications

07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

2 Jun 2017

Memory Awards winners help preserve Queensland’s history

Memory Awards winners help preserve Queensland’s history

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) last night announced the recipients of its 2017 fellowships and awards at the Queensland Memory Awards ceremony, an annual event that acknowledges excellence in research and the creation of new knowledge about the state’s history.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said State Library through the John Oxley Library offered fantastic opportunities for further research into our history and she applauded the winners for their contributions.

“These research initiatives reveal new things about our identity as people and communities living in Queensland and play an important part in shaping our future,” Ms Enoch said.

“Very often the work of historians and researchers goes unnoticed by the public, but through these awards we acknowledge their contributions and shine a light on wonderful stories and information that we hope will encourage more people to explore and share our rich and varied history.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that the fellowship program helps to highlight and activate SLQ’s rich collections and range of resources, as well as contribute new knowledge about Queensland.

“By working closely with State Library, our fellows will bring our collections to life and will contribute new research about our state’s vast history across a range of mediums including blog posts, oral histories, digital stories, and more,” Ms McDonald said.

This year, nine awards and fellowships were presented, with a collective prize pool of more than $110,000.

The 2017 award winners are:

  • John Oxley Library Award — Dr Spencer Routh OAM

This award recognises excellence and innovation in the recording of Queensland history by an individual and was awarded to Dr Spencer Routh OAM for his distinguished career in the library and information sciences sector.

  • John Oxley Library Community History Award — Annerley Stephens History Group

Annerley Stephens History Group’s Frank Corley Project sees volunteers working with communities in Annerley and surrounding suburbs to collect local histories relating to the houses that were photographed in the area in the 1970s by Frank Corley.

  • John Oxley Library Fellowship ($20,000) — Dr Lauren Istvandity

Lauren’s project Reminiscing about jazz in Queensland: preserving pre-1965 oral histories for the Qld Jazz Archive collection in the John Oxley Library will see her record and collect new oral histories about the history of jazz in Queensland.

  • Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship ($15,000) — Toni Massey

As a commercial diver and marine archaeologist, Toni’s project will examine how Queensland pearl divers pioneered the pearl shelling industry and in doing so, contributed to Queensland’s economic development.

  • Mittelheuser Scholar-in-Residence ($15,000) — Tess Maunder

Tess’s project Curating ‘digital futures’ includes a selection of international case-studies examining the relationship between ‘digital futures’ and contemporary curatorial practice.

  • Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation Fellowships (4 x $15,000)

Dr Peter Crossman is the recipient of the 2017 Digital Fellowship for his project Cairns of words and umbers: Queensland’s memory rolls of the Great War. Peter will document the names, places and stories of soldiers from 100 of Queensland’s honour boards.

  • Lisa Jackson will examine the home front story of Stradbroke Island’s Inebriate Institution in her project The unfinished war: the post-war lives of returned soldiers who spent time in the Inebriate Institution in Dunwich.

  • During the Second World War General Douglas MacArthur called Brisbane the most corrupt place in the South Pacific. Dr Judith Powell’s project Crime, passion and opportunity – policing Brisbane during World War 2 investigates Brisbane during this volatile time.

  • Visual artist Greer Townshend’s project Treasure: a soldier’s story explores archetypal imagery found in letters diaries, photographs and possessions of Queensland soldiers during the First World War.

Media enquiries:

Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications

07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

31 May 2017

Rare Shakespeare manuscript comes to State Library

Shakespeare will be escorted to State Library of Queensland for a special one night only appearance on 6 June.

Australia’s only original copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio, on loan from the State Library of NSW, is considered one of the most influential books ever published in the English language.

Its South Bank showing is a coup for State Library as it is the first time the Bard’s folio has been shown in Queensland. The special event sold out within days of tickets going on sale.

“We are tremendously excited to have this literary masterpiece in Queensland,” State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said.

“This event is a Cultural Precinct collaboration between State Library and QPAC for their 2017 international series presentation of The Royal Ballet.

“It highlights the value of our partnerships with national and international cultural institutions and the importance of our donors who help make these special events happen,” Ms McDonald said.

The First Folio was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death, and features 36 of Shakespeare’s plays including The Tempest, Twelfth Night and The Winter’s Tale which might have otherwise been lost forever.

“We are delighted to offer library visitors a chance to gain special insights into this historic document with rare books expert Maggie Patton,” she said.

Ms Patton will lead a page turning discussion of the folio explaining Shakespeare’s idiosyncrasies, the development of the English language and playwriting.

“There are no manuscripts of these plays available in the Bard’s own hand so the First Folio is the closest a reader can get to the original source,” Ms Patton said.

Following Ms Patton’s presentation, the backstory of some of the State Library’s own rare and remarkable treasures will be explored in celebration of Queensland Day.

Queen Victoria’s stockings to the mesmerising John Watts necklace, an extraordinary example of 19th-century goldsmith art, are just some of the rare treasures at State Library.

Presented by State Library of Queensland with the support of Queensland Library Foundation, and in association with the 2017 QPAC International Series presentation of The Royal Ballet.

For further media information and images please contact:  Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

26 Apr 2017

State Library exhibitions to explore civil rights in Queensland

State Library exhibitions to explore civil rights in Queensland

Question the notion of freedom, reflect on our collective past, and explore those civil rights won and lost at the State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) upcoming exhibitions.

Opening to the public on Friday 5 May are two complementary exhibitions exploring Queensland history: Freedom Then, Freedom Now and Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the exhibitions offer valuable insights into civil rights in Queensland.

“These exhibitions delve into our state’s recent past and reveal some of the significant legislative and cultural changes that have taken place in Queensland since the 1950s,” Ms Enoch said.

“Queensland has seen some major events in relation to personal liberties - from Eddie Mabo’s native title victory in 1992 to the anti-consorting laws introduced in 2013 - and these exhibitions offer Queenslanders the opportunity to learn more about both the historical facts and social context.

“There are Queenslanders alive today whose families have lived here for thousands of generations but when born here, were not counted as citizens in their own country until after the 1967 Referendum.

“We have many stories of activism and advocacy in Queensland that helped bring about the Referendum and the change in our Constitution, and these stories are represented in these exhibitions,” she said.

Freedom Then, Freedom Now draws on SLQ’s historical collections to journey into our recent past, explore the freedoms enjoyed and restricted in Queensland, and examine what happens when individual rights intersect with the collective good.

Curated by Emeritus Professor Peter Spearritt, Freedom Then, Freedom Now takes a uniquely Queensland look at freedoms won and lost in the state since the 1950s across a number of themes including censorship, marriage, citizenship, dress and travel.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that as custodian of Queensland’s collective memory, State Library of Queensland is uniquely placed to share insights into the state’s past.

“SLQ’s extensive collections house more than just published works, photographs and newspapers, with our repositories holding original materials and personally donated items as varied as clothing, signage, political ephemera, digital stories and even a cigarette case,” Ms McDonald said.

“These pieces tell a story unlike any other, and invite interpretations and individual reflections quite apart from the history recorded by formal institutions.”

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! commemorates the 1967 Referendum, a historic milestone for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rights, told through the eyes of Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA) alumni.

Ten years ago, ACPA developed Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was a creative response to the anniversary of the 1967 Referendum. In SLQ’s exhibition, the performers reflect on the creative process, research and the performance which shaped who they are today and their understanding of the campaign to be counted.

“The 1967 Referendum changed the course of Australian history and this exhibition shares that history from the personal perspective of Indigenous artists and creatives,” Ms McDonald said.

“Our partnership with ACPA for Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! is just one way in which we’re working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, community groups and individuals in Queensland to ensure their stories are collected, preserved and shared.”

Both exhibitions are free and open to the public from Friday 5 May until Sunday 1 October. For more information, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! is presented in partnership with Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA).

Interviews and images are available upon request.

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | SLQ Communications
07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

Freedom Then, Freedom Now
5 May – 1 Oct 2017
Open daily 10am–5pm
Philip Bacon Heritage Gallery, level 4
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct
Free entry

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!
5 May – 1 Oct 2017
Open Mon–Thu 9am–8pm, Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–5pm
kuril dhagun, level 1
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct
Free entry

20 Apr 2017

State Library highlights Queensland women of the First World War

State Library highlights Queensland women of the First World War

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) has launched its latest display in the Talbot Family Treasures Wall, Duty and Care as part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program.

Duty and Care explores items from SLQ’s First World War collections, such as photographs, diaries and letters, preserved as powerful examples of Queensland women’s wartime involvement and experiences.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that the items on display provide an insight into the often untold contributions and sacrifices women made both on the home front and the war front.

“While there were limited opportunities for active service, women found creative and resourceful ways to participate and contribute to the war efforts,” Ms McDonald said.

“Some enlisted in the Australian Army Nursing Service and saw active service overseas. Others threw themselves into fundraising activities, volunteered to care for wounded soldiers, or protested for peace."

“While the items displayed in Duty and Care can never paint a complete picture, they can reveal private experiences and, as a collection, these personal mementos and accounts can provide a greater understanding of how women in Queensland experienced the First World War, both at home and overseas,” Ms McDonald said.

The SLQ Treasures Wall will feature a different themed exhibition for every year of the centenary of the First World War and provides an opportunity to explore and expose different aspects of Queensland’s war time experience.

SLQ and the John Oxley Library are the custodians of the state’s First World War history and these displays allow some of the precious collection items to be viewed, while providing greater context and understanding of how the First World War impacted Queenslanders.

Duty and Care is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Duty and Care
12 April 2017 – 23 March 2018
Treasures Wall, Level 4, SLQ

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | 07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au
State Library of Queensland Communications

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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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