Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

18 Jul 2017

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Just days after Townsville residents Annie and Duncan Baxter learned their son Neil had died at Gallipoli they received a letter from him in the post.

It was full of youthful bravado and attempts to quell family anxiety back home and a heartbreaking reminder of all that they had lost.

From 26 – 28 July CityLibraries Thuringowa will host a free white gloves interactive experience with First World War treasures from State Library of Queensland (SLQ) such as letters, diaries and photographs.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the white gloves experience allows people to get close and personal with a curated selection of First World War treasures such as letters, diaries and photographs.

The Baxter’s story is one of a number of local Townsville stories that have been carefully curated for the city’s white gloves experience.

State Library will also be holding a workshop to show residents and visitors how to care for their own World War items and heritage organisations will also have the opportunity to learn how to promote and share collections online.

Mr Elvery said the Baxter story was a poignant example of the losses many Townsville families endured during wartime.

In the Baxter’s ill-fated letter Neil wrote: "We expect to be in action before many days are over—the sooner the better, as we are all anxious to have a 'go,' and I think the Australians will make a name for themselves."

“The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War,” Mr Elvery said.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, as part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Where: CityLibraries Thuringowa
Free, bookings required: (07) 4727 8310
When: Wednesday 26 July
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm   Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm

Links: whatson.Townsville, slq website

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

3 Jul 2017

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Ministerial statement

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch today (Monday) announced Queensland’s remote and regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will receive digital literacy training.

Speaking during NAIDOC Week celebrations, Ms Enoch said the new Deadly Digital Communities program will be delivered through the State Library of Queensland, Telstra and local councils.

Ms Enoch said the program will see community based training and professional development delivered to 26 regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Queensland.

“This is a huge step towards closing the gap and improving the digital inclusion of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Ms Enoch said.

“It is programs like this that boost our state’s entrepreneurial culture, by giving all Queenslanders the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer Tim O’Leary said the company was committed to working with organisations such as the State Library of Queensland to improve digital inclusion across Queensland.

“As more and more services and daily interactions move online, being able to use digital technologies brings vital health, social and financial benefits – especially for Indigenous people in remote locations,” Mr O’Leary said.

“We believe digital literacy has become an essential skill in the digital age. At Telstra, we want to see all Australians connect, participate and interact in the digital world, irrespective of where they live. This is what this initiative is all about.”

Mr O’Leary said Telstra had expanded its network coverage to rural locations such as Aurukun and Burketown over the last few months, and that this project was another example of Telstra’s ability to work with the government to deliver innovative programs to regional and rural Australia.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said Deadly Digital Communities was indicative of the innovative programs the State Library delivered in collaboration with public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres throughout Queensland.

“Deadly Digital Communities will help realise the often untapped potential of these unique and vibrant communities,” she said.
“Participants will learn about everything from sending an email to using social media to connect with family or to promote a business idea.”

Ms McDonald said digital inclusion was vital in helping communities reap the immense social and economic benefits of the digital world.

Deadly Digital Communities will commence in September and will roll out over two years to the communities of Aurukun, Cherbourg, Hope Vale, Lockhart River, Palm Island, Pormpuraaw, Wujal Wujal, Woorabinda, Bamaga, Injinoo, New Mapoon, Seisia and Umagico.

Another 13 Indigenous Knowledge Centres and remote public libraries will soon be added to the program.

Deadly Digital Communities is an initiative of the State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

MEDIA
Minister Enoch: 0412 393 909
State Library of Queensland - Kylie Roots, communications@slq.qld.gov.au, 07 3842 9847
Telstra – Anna Erbrederis anna.erbrederis@team.telstra.com, 03 9240 9478

1 Jul 2017

$2,000 on offer for Queensland’s next great young writer

$2,000 on offer for Queensland’s next great young writer

Entries are now open for State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) annual Young Writers Award competition, offering $2,000 for the best short story from a young writer.

Now in its 22nd year, the competition aims to launch the careers of the next generation of great Australian writers.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the Young Writers Award has become an integral part of uncovering young, creative writing talent in Queensland.

“State Library’s Young Writers Award has a long history of finding the future stars of Queensland’s writing community and giving them a head-start — from Rebecca Jessen and Chris Somerville to Benjamin Law and Tara June Winch,” Minister Enoch said.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said State Library hoped the competition would continue to foster young writers and introduce them to the publishing industry.

“The Young Writers Award helps writers find their voice, and gives them the confidence to work towards their literary aspirations,” Ms McDonald said.

“In 2017 we are also proud to announce the inaugural Young Writers Conference held at SLQ in November, at which competition entrants and other aspiring young writers will have the opportunity to partake in a full day of skill and knowledge-building workshops, advice and support giving, and networking.”

The 2017 winners of the Young Writers Award will be announced by Minister Enoch at an awards ceremony following the conference.

The competition is open to Queensland residents aged 15 to 25 years into two categories: 15 to 17 years (1,500 words) and 18 to 25 years (2,500 words).

The winner of the 18 to 25 years category receives $2,000 prize money, and the winner of the 15 to 17 years category receives $500.

Runners up and highly commended entrants are also awarded prizes including prize money, gift vouchers and book packs.

All prize winners also receive a membership to Queensland Writers Centre.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/awards for guidelines and entry forms, and to read past winning stories.

Entries close at 5pm on Thursday 31 August.

The Young Writers Award is presented by State Library of Queensland with support from Queensland Writers Centre.

Media enquiries:

Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications

07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

2 Jun 2017

Memory Awards winners help preserve Queensland’s history

Memory Awards winners help preserve Queensland’s history

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) last night announced the recipients of its 2017 fellowships and awards at the Queensland Memory Awards ceremony, an annual event that acknowledges excellence in research and the creation of new knowledge about the state’s history.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said State Library through the John Oxley Library offered fantastic opportunities for further research into our history and she applauded the winners for their contributions.

“These research initiatives reveal new things about our identity as people and communities living in Queensland and play an important part in shaping our future,” Ms Enoch said.

“Very often the work of historians and researchers goes unnoticed by the public, but through these awards we acknowledge their contributions and shine a light on wonderful stories and information that we hope will encourage more people to explore and share our rich and varied history.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that the fellowship program helps to highlight and activate SLQ’s rich collections and range of resources, as well as contribute new knowledge about Queensland.

“By working closely with State Library, our fellows will bring our collections to life and will contribute new research about our state’s vast history across a range of mediums including blog posts, oral histories, digital stories, and more,” Ms McDonald said.

This year, nine awards and fellowships were presented, with a collective prize pool of more than $110,000.

The 2017 award winners are:

  • John Oxley Library Award — Dr Spencer Routh OAM

This award recognises excellence and innovation in the recording of Queensland history by an individual and was awarded to Dr Spencer Routh OAM for his distinguished career in the library and information sciences sector.

  • John Oxley Library Community History Award — Annerley Stephens History Group

Annerley Stephens History Group’s Frank Corley Project sees volunteers working with communities in Annerley and surrounding suburbs to collect local histories relating to the houses that were photographed in the area in the 1970s by Frank Corley.

  • John Oxley Library Fellowship ($20,000) — Dr Lauren Istvandity

Lauren’s project Reminiscing about jazz in Queensland: preserving pre-1965 oral histories for the Qld Jazz Archive collection in the John Oxley Library will see her record and collect new oral histories about the history of jazz in Queensland.

  • Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship ($15,000) — Toni Massey

As a commercial diver and marine archaeologist, Toni’s project will examine how Queensland pearl divers pioneered the pearl shelling industry and in doing so, contributed to Queensland’s economic development.

  • Mittelheuser Scholar-in-Residence ($15,000) — Tess Maunder

Tess’s project Curating ‘digital futures’ includes a selection of international case-studies examining the relationship between ‘digital futures’ and contemporary curatorial practice.

  • Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation Fellowships (4 x $15,000)

Dr Peter Crossman is the recipient of the 2017 Digital Fellowship for his project Cairns of words and umbers: Queensland’s memory rolls of the Great War. Peter will document the names, places and stories of soldiers from 100 of Queensland’s honour boards.

  • Lisa Jackson will examine the home front story of Stradbroke Island’s Inebriate Institution in her project The unfinished war: the post-war lives of returned soldiers who spent time in the Inebriate Institution in Dunwich.

  • During the Second World War General Douglas MacArthur called Brisbane the most corrupt place in the South Pacific. Dr Judith Powell’s project Crime, passion and opportunity – policing Brisbane during World War 2 investigates Brisbane during this volatile time.

  • Visual artist Greer Townshend’s project Treasure: a soldier’s story explores archetypal imagery found in letters diaries, photographs and possessions of Queensland soldiers during the First World War.

Media enquiries:

Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications

07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

31 May 2017

Rare Shakespeare manuscript comes to State Library

Shakespeare will be escorted to State Library of Queensland for a special one night only appearance on 6 June.

Australia’s only original copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio, on loan from the State Library of NSW, is considered one of the most influential books ever published in the English language.

Its South Bank showing is a coup for State Library as it is the first time the Bard’s folio has been shown in Queensland. The special event sold out within days of tickets going on sale.

“We are tremendously excited to have this literary masterpiece in Queensland,” State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said.

“This event is a Cultural Precinct collaboration between State Library and QPAC for their 2017 international series presentation of The Royal Ballet.

“It highlights the value of our partnerships with national and international cultural institutions and the importance of our donors who help make these special events happen,” Ms McDonald said.

The First Folio was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death, and features 36 of Shakespeare’s plays including The Tempest, Twelfth Night and The Winter’s Tale which might have otherwise been lost forever.

“We are delighted to offer library visitors a chance to gain special insights into this historic document with rare books expert Maggie Patton,” she said.

Ms Patton will lead a page turning discussion of the folio explaining Shakespeare’s idiosyncrasies, the development of the English language and playwriting.

“There are no manuscripts of these plays available in the Bard’s own hand so the First Folio is the closest a reader can get to the original source,” Ms Patton said.

Following Ms Patton’s presentation, the backstory of some of the State Library’s own rare and remarkable treasures will be explored in celebration of Queensland Day.

Queen Victoria’s stockings to the mesmerising John Watts necklace, an extraordinary example of 19th-century goldsmith art, are just some of the rare treasures at State Library.

Presented by State Library of Queensland with the support of Queensland Library Foundation, and in association with the 2017 QPAC International Series presentation of The Royal Ballet.

For further media information and images please contact:  Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

26 Apr 2017

State Library exhibitions to explore civil rights in Queensland

State Library exhibitions to explore civil rights in Queensland

Question the notion of freedom, reflect on our collective past, and explore those civil rights won and lost at the State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) upcoming exhibitions.

Opening to the public on Friday 5 May are two complementary exhibitions exploring Queensland history: Freedom Then, Freedom Now and Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the exhibitions offer valuable insights into civil rights in Queensland.

“These exhibitions delve into our state’s recent past and reveal some of the significant legislative and cultural changes that have taken place in Queensland since the 1950s,” Ms Enoch said.

“Queensland has seen some major events in relation to personal liberties - from Eddie Mabo’s native title victory in 1992 to the anti-consorting laws introduced in 2013 - and these exhibitions offer Queenslanders the opportunity to learn more about both the historical facts and social context.

“There are Queenslanders alive today whose families have lived here for thousands of generations but when born here, were not counted as citizens in their own country until after the 1967 Referendum.

“We have many stories of activism and advocacy in Queensland that helped bring about the Referendum and the change in our Constitution, and these stories are represented in these exhibitions,” she said.

Freedom Then, Freedom Now draws on SLQ’s historical collections to journey into our recent past, explore the freedoms enjoyed and restricted in Queensland, and examine what happens when individual rights intersect with the collective good.

Curated by Emeritus Professor Peter Spearritt, Freedom Then, Freedom Now takes a uniquely Queensland look at freedoms won and lost in the state since the 1950s across a number of themes including censorship, marriage, citizenship, dress and travel.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that as custodian of Queensland’s collective memory, State Library of Queensland is uniquely placed to share insights into the state’s past.

“SLQ’s extensive collections house more than just published works, photographs and newspapers, with our repositories holding original materials and personally donated items as varied as clothing, signage, political ephemera, digital stories and even a cigarette case,” Ms McDonald said.

“These pieces tell a story unlike any other, and invite interpretations and individual reflections quite apart from the history recorded by formal institutions.”

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! commemorates the 1967 Referendum, a historic milestone for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rights, told through the eyes of Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA) alumni.

Ten years ago, ACPA developed Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was a creative response to the anniversary of the 1967 Referendum. In SLQ’s exhibition, the performers reflect on the creative process, research and the performance which shaped who they are today and their understanding of the campaign to be counted.

“The 1967 Referendum changed the course of Australian history and this exhibition shares that history from the personal perspective of Indigenous artists and creatives,” Ms McDonald said.

“Our partnership with ACPA for Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! is just one way in which we’re working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, community groups and individuals in Queensland to ensure their stories are collected, preserved and shared.”

Both exhibitions are free and open to the public from Friday 5 May until Sunday 1 October. For more information, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! is presented in partnership with Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA).

Interviews and images are available upon request.

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | SLQ Communications
07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

Freedom Then, Freedom Now
5 May – 1 Oct 2017
Open daily 10am–5pm
Philip Bacon Heritage Gallery, level 4
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct
Free entry

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!
5 May – 1 Oct 2017
Open Mon–Thu 9am–8pm, Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–5pm
kuril dhagun, level 1
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct
Free entry

20 Apr 2017

State Library highlights Queensland women of the First World War

State Library highlights Queensland women of the First World War

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) has launched its latest display in the Talbot Family Treasures Wall, Duty and Care as part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program.

Duty and Care explores items from SLQ’s First World War collections, such as photographs, diaries and letters, preserved as powerful examples of Queensland women’s wartime involvement and experiences.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that the items on display provide an insight into the often untold contributions and sacrifices women made both on the home front and the war front.

“While there were limited opportunities for active service, women found creative and resourceful ways to participate and contribute to the war efforts,” Ms McDonald said.

“Some enlisted in the Australian Army Nursing Service and saw active service overseas. Others threw themselves into fundraising activities, volunteered to care for wounded soldiers, or protested for peace."

“While the items displayed in Duty and Care can never paint a complete picture, they can reveal private experiences and, as a collection, these personal mementos and accounts can provide a greater understanding of how women in Queensland experienced the First World War, both at home and overseas,” Ms McDonald said.

The SLQ Treasures Wall will feature a different themed exhibition for every year of the centenary of the First World War and provides an opportunity to explore and expose different aspects of Queensland’s war time experience.

SLQ and the John Oxley Library are the custodians of the state’s First World War history and these displays allow some of the precious collection items to be viewed, while providing greater context and understanding of how the First World War impacted Queenslanders.

Duty and Care is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Duty and Care
12 April 2017 – 23 March 2018
Treasures Wall, Level 4, SLQ

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | 07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au
State Library of Queensland Communications

7 Apr 2017

State Library explores our digital future

State Library explores our digital future

In 2017, State Library of Queensland (SLQ) will present a Digital Futures program of free tech play days, interactive exhibition and game lab, discussions, and workshops.

Elements of the digital landscape, in which we now learn, work and play, including adaptive technologies, education, robotics, new business models, social media, mobile technology, and virtual worlds, will be showcased, tested and discussed through the Digital Futures year-long program.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said that Digital Futures is about deepening understanding around digital innovation and digital literacy across Queensland.

“SLQ’s Digital Futures program highlights the importance of providing communities and businesses across the state with the skills and connectivity to thrive in the digital age, an initiative the Queensland Government is committed to achieving,” Ms Enoch said.

“Technology now reaches almost every aspect of our lives, and increased use of digital technologies is providing a range of new and exciting opportunities for Queensland – a state which has long been a hotspot for innovation and development.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that Digital Futures invites Queenslanders to immerse themselves in futurism, digital participation and our digital place.

“Technology has given us new tools through which to question, understand, re-imagine and contribute to communities and the world we live in.

“Most aspects of daily life have been altered by the digital age and the aim of Digital Futures is to explore the impacts and challenges of this, as well as the possibilities technology offers,” Ms McDonald said.

“Through Digital Futures and associated programming, we explore how technological advances are changing how we learn and access information, our economy, our environment, our leisure activities, the future of employment and the workforce, and how these changes are affecting us on a fundamental, human level,” Ms McDonald said.

The centre of the Digital Futures program is the interactive and intriguing Digital Futures Lab, housed in the SLQ Gallery. In this immersive space, visitors can experience cutting-edge technologies, have a virtual reality experience, engage with real-life robots and learn mindfulness from devices.

Visitors to Digital Futures Lab will receive information, hands-on tech experiences and be presented with provocative questions to prompt inquisitive thinking and perhaps spark the imagination.

A deeper experience of the Digital Futures Lab is currently offered each week at the Wednesday Play Day sessions. Visitors can try their hand at cutting-edge technologies such as HP Sprout which enables 3D scanning and digital mash-ups, or contribute to the interactive and ever-growing interactive art installation Hive Mind.

Digital Futures Lab is free and open in SLQ Gallery at State Library of Queensland until 5 November. For full Digital Futures programming details please visit http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/events/digital-futures.

Interviews and images are available upon request.

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

4 Apr 2017

Queensland Literary Awards open for entries to celebrate home grown writing talent

Queensland Literary Awards open for entries to celebrate home grown writing talent

Authors are now invited to enter the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards (QLA) and Queensland Writers Fellowships.

Entries are now open for these prestigious annual awards recognising the literary achievements of published and emerging Queensland and Australian authors.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said a strong focus of the QLA was supporting and promoting the professional success of Queensland’s talented writers and highlighting the importance of innovation in publishing in 2017.

“The QLA play an important role in discovering local writers and sharing their work with an Australian and global readership via print and digital media,” Ms Enoch said.

“State Library of Queensland (SLQ) leads the way in nurturing a reading culture in Queensland — something that is fundamental to an innovative and creative community.

“Through hosting these awards, SLQ is creating opportunities for emerging writers to develop work for publication and secure careers in the creative industries.”

The Queensland Government invests in the creative futures of Queensland’s writers with continuing support for the Awards, including the $25,000 Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance.

Young writers, 30 years and under, are encouraged to apply for one of two Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards, each to the value of $12,500.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald paid tribute to the many organisations that sponsor and champion the Queensland Literary Awards.

“We are grateful to have the continued support of key QLA partners including the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, QUT, Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail,” Ms McDonald said.

Nominations for the 2017 awards are being sought in the following categories:

  • Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance ($25,000)
  • Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards (two available, $12,500 each)
  • The University of Queensland Fiction Book Award ($10,000)
  • The University of Queensland Non-Fiction Book Award ($10,000)
  • Griffith University Young Adult Book Award ($10,000)
  • Griffith University Children’s Book Award ($10,000)
  • University of Southern Queensland History Book Award ($10,000)
  • University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection — Steele Rudd Award ($10,000)
  • State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection — Judith Wright Calanthe Award ($10,000)
  • QUT Digital Literature Award ($10,000)
  • Unpublished Indigenous Writer — David Unaipon Award (supported by the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund and UQP) ($10,000)
  • Emerging Queensland Writer — Manuscript Award (supported by UQP) ($10,000)
  • The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award ($10,000)

The awards also encompass the Queensland Writers Fellowships, each worth $15,000, awarded to three Queensland writers each year for professional development.

Nominations for the Queensland Literary Awards close at 5pm on Wednesday 31 May 2017. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in October.

For more information about the Queensland Literary Awards and Queensland Writers Fellowships or to download nomination forms, visit qldliteraryawards.org.au.

Media enquiries:
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au 07 3842 9084

20 Mar 2017

Pushing the boundaries of architecture at State Library

Pushing the boundaries of architecture at State Library

International architects will gather to discuss contemporary issues facing the profession, when the annual UQ Architecture lecture series returns to State Library of Queensland (SLQ) this autumn.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that this year’s series aims to push the boundaries of architecture in all its forms.

“In 2017, SLQ is exploring ‘digital futures’ and the potential impacts of technology on all aspects of our lives — from work and transport, to how we communicate, live and engage with the built environment,” Ms McDonald said.

“Previous lectures have focused on the impact of digital media on architecture and sustainability efficiencies due to new improved technologies. This year we look forward to hearing about experimental architectural processes beyond disciplinary constraints and how architects are leading the way in bringing about societal change through clever design.”

The University of Queensland School of Architecture senior lecturer and series curator Dr Kelly Greenop said the series showcases architects as social innovators exploring design and technical limits.

“In 2017 we’re celebrating innovative architectural practices from our own city, as well as the most esteemed architects working nationally at the moment,” Dr Greenop said.

“We are also pushing our regional boundaries out to embrace architecture in Asia. The Brisbane architectural community is keen to hear the design synergies and experiences from our near neighbours.”

For this year’s series, architects will travel from Sydney, Melbourne, Singapore, Indonesia, and as far as Turkey, with a host of local Brisbane designers completing the line-up.

Wenhui Lim from SPARK* architects will launch the series on 21 March, as part of the 2017 Asia Pacific Architecture Forum.

Lectures are held weekly on Tuesday evenings from 21 March to 23 May (excluding 18 and 25 April), with networking and refreshments prior to each session.

Architecture professionals attending the events will be eligible for two formal continuing professional development points (CPD) with the Australian Institute of Architects.

The UQ Architecture lecture series is partnership between SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library and The University of Queensland’s School of Architecture.

For more information about weekly speakers, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on. The lectures will be live streamed on the SLQ website for offsite viewers.

Date Tuesdays 21 Mar – 23 May 2017 (excl. 16 & 25 Apr), 6pm–8pm
Venue SLQ Auditorium 1, State Library of Queensland
Cultural Precinct, South Bank
Bookings Free, bookings slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

Media enquiries
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9084

Schedule of speakers

21 March
Wenhui Lim
SPARK (Singapore)

28 March
Melissa Liando
Csutoras & Liando (Indonesia)

4 April
Jeremy McLeod
Breathe Architecture (Melbourne)

11 April
Muge Belek and Frederico Fialho Teixeira
[f]FLAT (Brisbane)

No lectures 18 and 25 April

2 May
Melody Chen
Atelier Chen Hung (Brisbane)
Rebecca Caldwell and Emily Juckes
Maytree Studios (Brisbane)

9 May
Alexis and Murat Şanal
ŞANALarc (Turkey)

16 May
Chris Major (Sydney)
Welsh + Major

23 May
William Smart
Smart Design Studio (Sydney)

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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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