Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

6 Oct 2017

State Library to replicate and digitise rare Queensland-made Braille globe

State Library to replicate and digitise rare Queensland-made Braille globe

An intricate Braille globe invented in Queensland in the 1950s will be reimagined for a new generation of Queenslanders thanks to the power of a crowd funding initiative by Queensland Library Foundation.

A room full of budding philanthropists joined together with likeminded lovers of culture, heritage and the arts at State Library of Queensland (SLQ) for the Foundation’s annual Crowd Giving event.

Audience members heard passionate pitches for three new SLQ projects and then, under the guidance of respected philanthropists Courtney Talbot and Alison Green, grilled the presenters, debated and discussed, before voting on which idea was most worthy of their collective $10,000 funding kitty.

A project to make known the intriguing story of a rare globe held in the SLQ collection was the winning pitch.

The globe was originally created for vision-impaired children by Queenslander Richard Frank Tunley, known as the ‘Fairy Godfather of Blind Children’, who dedicated his life to improving outcomes for vision-impaired children and adults, producing Braille globes and maps.

The funding will enable State Library to use photogrammetry and 3D printing technologies to create an exact replica of the globe able to be touched as the original was intended to be experienced, accompanied by detailed digital plans and learning notes available for sharing internationally.

Some of the money will also support SLQ preservation staff to conserve the original Tunley globe, which is now quite fragile.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the Tunley globe is a marvel of Queensland ingenuity, enterprise and skill.

“The Tunley globe is a truly remarkable creation and a unique, perhaps unknown, Queensland story,” Ms McDonald said.

“SLQ is immensely grateful to the donors who have put their money behind making this fascinating piece of Queensland history discoverable and accessible for a new generation of Queenslanders .”

“A donation to Queensland Library Foundation directly supports State Library of Queensland’s’s important and valued work and will help impact the growth of knowledge and innovation in our state,” Ms McDonald said.

To find out more or pledge your support, visit foundation.slq.qld.gov.au/make-a-donation or contact Queensland Library Foundation directly on (07) 3840 7767 or at foundation@slq.qld.gov.au.

The original Tunley globe will be on display in an upcoming SLQ exhibition in the Philip Bacon Heritage Gallery on level 4, opening in December 2017.

Media enquiries
SLQ Marketing & Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

4 Oct 2017

Winners of prestigious Queensland Literary Awards announced

Winners of prestigious Queensland Literary Awards announced

Queensland’s literary talent was tonight (Wednesday 4 October) recognised at the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards (QLA) ceremony at the State Library of Queensland (SLQ).

Queensland Premier and Arts Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk congratulated the winners of the 2017 QLA while also confirming continued funding to support the awards in partnership with SLQ.

“After reinstating the QLA in 2015, I am proud to confirm that my government will continue to support the awards, reaffirming our ongoing commitment to celebrating and nurturing our literary artists,” Premier Palaszczuk said.

Attending the awards on behalf of the Premier, Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch applauded the rich pool of Queensland writers celebrated at the awards.

“I am proud of this government’s commitment to building Queensland’s reputation as a leader in the national literary landscape by profiling and supporting our homegrown writers,” Ms Enoch said.

“This year’s awards include the QUT Digital Literature Award, which supports continued growth in the digital space. I was delighted to present the $25,000 Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance to Bill Wilkie from Mossman in Far North Queensland for his work The Daintree Blockade: The Battle for Australia’s Tropical Rainforests.”

Ms Enoch also announced the two recipients of the Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards which help foster the next generation of literary talent.

“Congratulations to Lech Blaine from regional Queensland and Mindy Gill from South Brisbane who will both receive $10,000 each along with an additional $2500 worth of professional development,” she said.

Professor Andrew Griffiths, chairperson, Library Board of Queensland, presented the three $15,000 Queensland Writers Fellowships – designed to advance a project over a 12-month period - to Zenobia Frost, Linda Neil and Mirandi Riwoe.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald presented the State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award to Antigone Kefala for Fragments, her first poetry collection in 20 years.

Ms McDonald also presented Janet Lee with the Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award for her work The Killing of Louisa, which judges said showed great control of character, plot and narrative.

This year, the QLA, presented by SLQ and supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland (AQ), offered prizes for authors in 13 categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry, for published and unpublished work.

The Queensland Government continues to match sponsor and philanthropic support through funding across all award categories, and in partnership with SLQ also supports three Queensland Writers Fellowships (QWF) of $15,000, providing authors with an opportunity to develop their manuscripts and writing projects.

A further eight Queensland writers have been selected in 2017 to receive Griffith Review Queensland Writing Fellowships, supported by AQ, SLQ and Griffith Review, which will culminate with the Fellows’ completed pieces published in the Griffith Review next year.

These Fellowships were awarded to Ashley Hay, Mirandi Riwoe, Andrea Baldwin, Victoria Carless, Anne Richards, Matthew Wengert, Jill Barker and Rosie Funder.

On behalf of the Premier, Ms Enoch acknowledged the support of QLA partners: The University of Queensland, Griffith University, University of Southern Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Griffith Review, the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail.

2017 Queensland Literary Award winners


Queensland Premier's Award for a work of State Significance (Prize: $25,000)

  • The Daintree Blockade: The Battle for Australia's Tropical Rainforests by Bill Wilkie (Four Mile Books)

Queensland Premier's Young Publishers and Writers Awards (Prize: $12,500 each)

  • Lech Blaine
  • Mindy Gill

Queensland Writers Fellowships (Prize: $15,000 each)

  • Zenobia Frost for Museum of Dwellings
  • Linda Neil for People are Kind
  • Mirandi Riwoe for A Gold Mountain Woman

The University of Queensland Fiction Book Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • The Birdman's Wife by Melissa Ashley (Affirm Press)

The University of Queensland Non-Fiction Book Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • Saltwater by Cathy McLennan (UQP)

Griffith University Children’s Book Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • The Grand, Genius Summer of Henry Hoobler by Lisa Shanahan (Allen & Unwin)

Griffith University Young Adult Book Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley (Pan Macmillan)

University of Southern Queensland History Book Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • Into the Heart of Tasmania by Rebe Taylor (MUP)

University of Southern Queensland Short Story Collection – Steele Rudd Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • The Circle and the Equator by Kyra Giorgi (UWA Publishing)

State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection – Judith Wright Calanthe Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • Fragments by Antigone Kefala (Giramondo)

QUT Digital Literature Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • Nine Billion Branches by Jason Nelson

Unpublished Indigenous Writer – David Unaipon Award (Prize: $10,000)

  • Mirrored Pieces by Lisa Fuller

Emerging Queensland Writer – Manuscript Award (Prize $10,000)

  • The Killing of Louisa by Janet Lee

The Courier-Mail People's Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award

  • Saltwater by Cathy McLennan (UQP)


For more information about the awards visit www.qldliteraryawards.org.au
Photos available upon request: Cinnamon Watson Publicity, 0432 219 643 or email cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

25 Sep 2017

Celebrate the arts and sciences at State Library

Celebrate the arts and sciences at State Library

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is helping young people and families engage with the arts and sciences in a meaningful way by hosting a free, family-friendly Fun Palace event on Saturday 7 October.

For one day only, SLQ will be transformed into a dedicated wonderland of scientific enquiry and creativity as art and science collide.

This year’s SLQ Fun Palace will feature an intriguing presentation by well-known science broadcaster and author Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, an explosive performance by Street Science, and a host of activities, workshops, and demonstrations.

Visitors can expect to get hands-on with a range of innovative technologies, expanding on the highly popular Digital Futures Lab interactive exhibition.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said Fun Palace is a true celebration of art, science, innovation and discovery, and offers a world of opportunity for Queensland’s younger generation.

“Queensland is moving into the information economy and it is essential that young people have access to and are participating in creative and scientific pursuits,” Ms Enoch said.

“Fun Palace offers young people a chance to try their hand at a range of art and science-related activities in a family-friendly, community-led environment, and provides an opportunity to see what sparks their interests and gets them excited.”

Fun Palace is a global movement, held annually on the first weekend of October, which encourages everyone to be an artist and a scientist for a day by interacting with a range of fun and informative activities and performances.

The first worldwide Fun Palaces where held in October 2014, when 138 venues, locations, communities and groups created their own local events.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said SLQ is excited to be part of the worldwide Fun Palace movement for the third year in a row.

“The Fun Palace concept is about working with our communities to get people excited about and engaged in the arts and sciences.

“The event encourages people of all ages, with a particular focus on children and families, to get hands-on and minds-on with a range of artistic and scientific disciplines such as ecology, coding, engineering, writing, illustrating, and more,” Ms McDonald said.

SLQ will host its Fun Palace on Saturday 7 October from 9.30am to 2.30pm. Entry and all activities are free and open to the public.

Interviews and images available upon request.

Media enquiries
Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

SLQ is proud to be a Fun Palace Maker in Fun Palaces happening around the world.

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki appears by arrangement with Claxton Speakers International.

5 Sep 2017

2017 Queensland Literary Awards finalists announced

2017 Queensland Literary Awards finalists announced

The diversity and excellence of literature from Queensland and across Australia has been recognised with the announcement today of the finalists for the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards (QLAs).

Presented by the State Library of Queensland (SLQ), the QLAs offer prizes for writers in thirteen categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry, for published and unpublished work.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that celebrating some of the best examples of locally-developed literature through events such as the QLAs is central to the State Library of Queensland’s commitment to nurturing a culture of reading, writing and ideas.

“This year’s shortlist includes important accounts of real life events that have shaped Queensland communities and individuals, as well as extraordinary works of creativity and imagination.”

“The QLA have fostered the careers of writers such as Cathy McLennan, who has progressed from winning the Emerging Queensland Writer award in 2014 through to a nomination for the Queensland Premier’s Award for a Work of State Significance for her remarkable non-fiction book Saltwater in 2017,” Ms McDonald said.

“Nominees also include last year’s winner of The Courier-Mail People’s Choice category, Mary-Rose Maccoll, a writer who has previously been celebrated for fictional works, but in 2017 has received three nominations for her deeply personal non-fiction title, For a Girl.”

Ms McDonald noted the introduction of the QUT Digital Literature Award by SLQ in 2017 to acknowledge contemporary publishing and digital innovation in storytelling.

“Queensland has always been home to a vibrant and passionate literary community and we are proud to continue supporting writing, publishing and reading, both in print and online,” Ms McDonald said.

“We are grateful to have the continued support of key QLA partners including the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, University of Southern Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail.”

The Queensland Government continues to match sponsor and partnership funding across all award categories, and in partnership with SLQ supports three Queensland Writers Fellowships of $15,000 to provide authors
with an opportunity to develop their manuscripts and writing projects.

The award winners and fellowship recipients will be announced at a special ceremony to be held at State Library of Queensland on Wednesday 4 October.

The shortlists can be found at qldliteraryawards.org.au/about/shortlists

Media enquiries:
Amanda Lawson, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

25 Aug 2017

Vote for your Queensland Book of the Year

Vote for your Queensland Book of the Year

Voting for The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year as part of the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards opens today.

The winning author will receive a $10,000 prize at the Queensland Literary Awards (QLAs) in October, with The Courier-Mail’s sponsorship matched by funding from the Queensland Government.

Premier and Arts Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk welcomed the announcement of this year’s shortlisted books for People’s Choice Queensland Book of the year and encouraged Queenslanders to participate and support the wonderful authors vying for the award.

“My Government is pleased to support our talented local writers through the Queensland Literary Awards, and I encourage booklovers to cast their votes for the People’s Choice award and champion contemporary Queensland authors,” said Ms Palaszczuk.

“It is important we recognise the state’s outstanding literary talent, support the telling and celebration of our stories and foster our next generation of writing talent.”

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said that the People’s Choice Award is one of the prestigious categories of the QLAs and revealed many talented writers.

“Our state has a proud history of producing exceptional literary talent and this award is a wonderful opportunity for Queensland readers to support and celebrate local writers.”

State Librarian and CEO, Vicki McDonald today announced the shortlist for the award, which includes popular authors Nick Earls and Mary-Rose MacColl, the recipient of the 2016 award for her novel Swimming Home.

“The books nominated for the People’s Choice award in 2017 are reflective of the creativity, diversity and tenacity of the people of Queensland,” said Ms McDonald.

“The shortlist includes flights of fancy from stifling Brisbane summers to Byzantine adventures, powerful stories of secrets and survival, and connections to community and family.”

The Courier-Mail editor Lachlan Heywood said the People’s Choice award offers everyday Queenslanders the chance to join the judging panel and support local writers.

"The Courier-Mail is passionate about promoting literacy and supporting Queensland talent, and is proud to help highlight such an accomplished group of authors” said Mr Heywood.

Amongst this year's nominees is Cathy McLennan’s Saltwater, previously awarded the 2014 Emerging Queensland Author – Unpublished Manuscript (under the title We Come From Saltwater People). The progression of this important true story illustrates the crucial developmental support that the QLAs provide to emerging Queensland authors.

Queenslanders have until Monday 25 September to vote online at qldliteraryawards.org.au.

The winner of The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year will be announced at the Queensland Literary Awards ceremony, to be held at State Library of Queensland on Wednesday 4 October.

The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award Shortlist 2017:

  • The Birdman's Wife by Melissa Ashley (Affirm Press)
  • Vancouver by Nick Earls (Inkerman & Blunt)
  • Ghost Empire by Richard Fidler (HarperCollins)
  • A Hundred Small Lessons by Ashley Hay (Allen & Unwin)
  • Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms by Anita Heiss (Simon & Schuster)
  • To Prey and To Silence by Joan Isaacs (A and A Publishing)
  • For a Girl by Mary-Rose MacColl (Allen & Unwin)
  • Saltwater by Cathy McLennan (UQP)

The Queensland Government through State Library of Queensland and Arts Queensland supports and champions the Queensland Literary Awards in nurturing a culture of reading, writing and ideas.

Media enquiries:
Amanda Lawson, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

25 Aug 2017

Neon glow illuminates State Library

Neon glow illuminates State Library

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) has turned on the lights for The Salon Electric, a celebration of neon and design.

Iconic pieces curated by neon sign maker Michael Blazek are now on display alongside historical photographs from SLQ’s collections.

Housed in SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library, The Salon Electric explores the process of making neon, its relationship to nightlife subculture, and the role of neon in contemporary art and design.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the collections share a unique period in Queensland’s history and aim to ignite Queenslanders’ living memory.

“The historical images speak to a different, more carefree, time — from the heyday of the Gold Coast’s glitter strip to the regional motel signs dotting the highways,” Ms McDonald said.

“Together with Michael’s Blazek’s curated signs, The Salon Electric tells the story of neon signage in Queensland and highlights the role of the maker in design.”

Second generation neon sign maker Michael Blazek has worked with SLQ to curate signage from his personal collection as well as essential tools of the trade.

The Salon Electric features iconic Brisbane pieces from Jo-Jo’s restaurant, Kookaburra Cafe, and Mr Fourex’s beer.

Queenslanders are invited to share their own photographs of local neon signs to aid SLQ in digitally capturing this period of signage and design history.

Using the social media platform Historypin, visitors can upload images from home, add a location, and explore visuals of other signs across the state.

Mr Blazek estimates there are only 200 large scale neon signs left in Queensland, with many signs steadily taken out of service over the past decade.

“There are so many beautiful signs that are disappearing and that’s really sad,” he said.

“Neon is a long-standing and unique form of design, and the slow dismantling of signs is a huge loss to the design community.”

Visitors can meet Michael in a special Q&A session on Tuesday 5 September, following the Queensland premiere screening of Brisbane-produced documentary NEON.

Directed by Lawrence Johnston and produced by Veronica Fury, NEON explores the beauty, invention, design and heritage of the neon sign in a journey across America.

NEON was produced with assistance from Screen Queensland, Film Victoria, and the Premiere Fund of the Melbourne International Film Festival.

The Salon Electric is open daily in the Design Lounge, level 2, State Library of Queensland until February 2018.

For more information visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

NEON
Queensland premiere

Tuesday 5 September, 6pm–8pm
SLQ Auditorium 1, level 2
State Library of Queensland
Cultural Precinct, South Bank

Followed by Q&A with

  • Michael Blazek, neon sign maker and The Salon Electric curator
  • Lawrence Johnston, NEON film director
  • Veronica Fury, NEON film producer

High resolution images available upon request

Media enquiries
SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

23 Aug 2017

Thousands more Queensland seniors to be given helping hand to bridge digital divide

Ministerial statement

Thousands more Queensland seniors to be given helping hand to bridge digital divide

The state’s seniors will be going digital with more than 10,000 people expected to get involved in the popular Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland program.

Minister for Innovation, Science and Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said today (Wednesday) training sessions will be delivered at 30 public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres across the state as part of the program.

Ms Enoch said the program will teach Queensland seniors to use a variety of technologies to help them navigate the evolving digital world. 

“This program will provide Queensland’s growing seniors population with the skills needed to securely access essential services online,” Ms Enoch said.

“The digital world is changing at a rapid pace and navigating it comfortably is something often take for granted. Tech Savvy Seniors delivers well-paced sessions to help seniors develop a range of useful skills including how to use a smartphone and an iPad, the basics of social media, and how to shop online and access core government services. The program strives to get Queensland’s older population online with confidence, help reduce social isolation often experienced from not being digitally connected, and improve resilience to online fraud and financial abuse. In fact, this year we’ve rolled out two new digital services for Queenslanders over 60. Our Seniors Concessions service enables Queensland seniors to apply for and access multiple concessions through a single process, saving them time, money, and effort. We are looking for feedback on our new My Account dashboard. My Account personalises government services around your needs, age and location and presents it together in one easy and convenient dashboard. My Account works for all Queenslanders, but we have started by focusing on services for seniors. This meets the government’s commitment to improving services for over 60s in the Queensland: An Age Friendly Community Action Plan.”

Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland – in its second year - is a partnership between the State Library of Queensland, Telstra, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, and Queensland Public Libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres. Training is delivered by experienced facilitators, with all the necessary technology provided for the sessions.

Minister for Seniors Coralee O’Rourke said the Tech Savvy Seniors program demonstrates the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to improving the lives of older Queenslanders by bridging the digital divide.

“While digital literacy is steadily increasing across the state, Queensland’s over 65 population is one of the groups who are the least digitally included and are at risk of being left behind,” she said.

“As more and more government and essential services move online, strengthening the digital literacy of seniors will better facilitate their access to information and provide them with the confidence and skills they need to embrace digital services.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the community response to the program previously was overwhelming and this year’s program is proving to be just as popular.

“The feedback we’ve received about Tech Savvy Seniors has been incredibly positive which demonstrates the demand among seniors to stay connected and up-to-date,” she said.

“From online grocery orders to connecting with children or grandchildren, the program aims to deliver tangible, often life-changing outcomes for older Queenslanders. It is wonderful to see how these services are making such a positive impact on the participants’ lives.”

Telstra’s General Manager for Digital Inclusion, Nancie-Lee Robinson, said Tech Savvy Seniors is part of Telstra’s commitment to helping all Australians enjoy the benefits of being connected and engaged with digital technology.

“Telstra’s 2017 Australian Digital Inclusion Index research found Queensland seniors, or those aged over 65, are our most digitally excluded group. Tech Savvy Seniors is a way to help address that,” Ms Robinson said.

“Digital technology can help break down social barriers, create efficiencies, and open up new learning and engagement opportunities for Queenslanders in their golden years.”

Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland 2017-2018 participating library services and Indigenous Knowledge Centres: Brisbane City Council, Bundaberg Regional Council, Burdekin Shire Council, Cassowary Coast Regional Council, Central Highlands Regional Council, Charters Towers Regional Council, Cherbourg Aboriginal Shire Council, Cook Shire Council, Douglas Shire Council, Fraser Coast Regional Council, Gold Coast City Council, Goondiwindi Regional Council, Gympie Regional Council, Ipswich City Council, Livingstone Shire Council, Lockhart River Aboriginal Shire Council, Lockyer Valley Regional Council, Logan City Council, Maranoa Regional Council, Moreton Bay Regional Council, Mount Isa City Council, Noosa Shire Council, North Burnett Regional Council, Rockhampton Regional Council, Scenic Rim Regional Council, Southern Downs Regional Council, Sunshine Coast Regional Council, Toowoomba Regional Council, Western Downs Regional Council and Whitsunday Regional Council.

For further information about the Tech Savvy Seniors Queensland Initiative, visit www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/programs.


Minister Enoch - 0412 393 909
State Library of Queensland - Kylie Roots, communications@slq.qld.gov.au, 07 3842 9847

14 Aug 2017

Treasures from the First World War come to Mackay

Treasures from the First World War come to Mackay

Cholera belts, cardigans and a curious offering of 31 Nightingales were all shipped off to European battlefields thanks to the people of Mackay during the First World War, according to a State Library of Queensland (SLQ) expert visiting the city on 22 August.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the shipments, which included a wrap for wounded soldiers known as a Nightingale, were catalogued in Red Cross magazines and helped to detail Mackay’s contribution to the war effort.

These 100-year-old magazines, along with precious letters, diaries and photographs will be on display at Dudley Denny City Library as part of a free white gloves interactive experience hosted by State Library.

Mr Elvery said the white gloves experience allowed people to get up close and personal with a carefully curated selection of treasures from the Mackay area including the Red Cross magazine and the Fudge diaries.

Louis Fudge, a former Mirani State School student and locomotive driver, fought in the war and kept meticulous notes of his activities in a series of diaries for his wife Nell back home.

In the first diary Louis wrote: “To My Dear Wife Nell, As the censor has access to all letters I intend in this, and perhaps other books, to give you, in the form of a diary, as it were, a rather full account of our doings”.

The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

Where: Dudley Denny City Library
When: Wednesday 22 August  
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm
Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm
Free, bookings required mailto:localhistory@mackay.qld.gov.au or 07 4961 9387

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

25 Jul 2017

Indigenous students to uncover forgotten WWI history at State Library of Queensland

Indigenous students to uncover forgotten WWI history at State Library of Queensland

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander soldiers in the First World War saw foreign battlefields as a chance to secure decent wages and escape segregation and discrimination back home, according to Indigenous students taking part in a special State Library of Queensland workshop on 31 July.

Twenty-four students in Years 9 to12, from Cloncurry to the Gold Coast, will sift through State Library’s century-old letters, diaries and photos to uncover long forgotten stories of Indigenous bravery.

The two-day workshop is part of the Department of Education and Training’s Anzac Indigenous Cultural Study Tour and Indigenous Student Ambassador Network Leadership Camp which encourages students to better understand the contribution of Indigenous service personnel to the Anzac legacy and share their knowledge with others.

The five major prize winners of the study tour will also visit key sites and memorials in Canberra and New Zealand in September.

Sophie Thorne-Saffy, who is an Indigenous student leader in Year 11 at Charleville State High School, believes many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders felt safer on foreign battlefields than in their own country.

“They weren’t treated equally at home so going to fight was like a safe place for them; they were away from all the segregation and racism they had to suffer through most of their lives.” Sophie said.

“They needed an escape from the torture they lived through (in Australia).”

“Many saw that going into the defence force was going to help people see them as citizens and help push for the respect they wanted and also needed,” Sophie said.

More than 1,250 Indigenous Australians enlisted in the First World War, with around 300 from Queensland.

However, at the start of the conflict, The Protection of Aborigines Act, Queensland (1897) made enlistment impossible. The Act denied Indigenous people the basic rights of citizenship, and restricted their movements and activities.

Despite this prohibition, Indigenous men still tried to enlist from 1914. Many travelled hundreds of miles to try their luck at recruiting centres far away from their communities, if they had been rejected closer to home. Others with mixed parentage scraped through by claiming foreign nationality.

In May 1917, the Australian Government relaxed the rules around Indigenous enlistment following heavy losses on the Western Front.

The student workshop is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program which is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

18 Jul 2017

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Historic WWI letters tell of Townsville family’s tragic loss

Just days after Townsville residents Annie and Duncan Baxter learned their son Neil had died at Gallipoli they received a letter from him in the post.

It was full of youthful bravado and attempts to quell family anxiety back home and a heartbreaking reminder of all that they had lost.

From 26 – 28 July CityLibraries Thuringowa will host a free white gloves interactive experience with First World War treasures from State Library of Queensland (SLQ) such as letters, diaries and photographs.

SLQ Regional Coordinator Niles Elvery said the white gloves experience allows people to get close and personal with a curated selection of First World War treasures such as letters, diaries and photographs.

The Baxter’s story is one of a number of local Townsville stories that have been carefully curated for the city’s white gloves experience.

State Library will also be holding a workshop to show residents and visitors how to care for their own World War items and heritage organisations will also have the opportunity to learn how to promote and share collections online.

Mr Elvery said the Baxter story was a poignant example of the losses many Townsville families endured during wartime.

In the Baxter’s ill-fated letter Neil wrote: "We expect to be in action before many days are over—the sooner the better, as we are all anxious to have a 'go,' and I think the Australians will make a name for themselves."

“The workshops are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and provides the community with an opportunity to participate in the 100 year commemoration of the First World War,” Mr Elvery said.

Q ANZAC 100 captures living memories of Queensland’s experiences during and after the First World War and provides people across Queensland an opportunity to learn, understand and contribute to the Anzac Centenary.

First World War Treasures: a white gloves experience, as part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program, is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Where: CityLibraries Thuringowa
Free, bookings required: (07) 4727 8310
When: Wednesday 26 July
White gloves experience | 10 am- 12 pm   Conservation clinic | 1pm – 4pm

Links: whatson.Townsville, slq website

For further media information and images please contact:
Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

20 Jul 2017

Rockhampton print house honoured with Queensland business history award

Rockhampton print house honoured with Queensland business history award

Fourth-generation family business City Printing Works received the 2017 Queensland Business History Award at tonight’s Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame induction dinner.

City Printing Works was established in 1903 by Andrew (Lofty) Anderson after he arrived in Rockhampton with his family and a second-hand printing press in tow.

The company produced The Critic, a weekly social justice paper covering politics and sport, sold around Rockhampton and Mount Morgan for a penny.

With an initial print run of 2,500 copies, production expanded rapidly before the Great Depression forced the paper’s closure in 1931.

However, the company’s printing division endured, with the Andersons adapting the focus of their business to include a variety of printed material for the local community including tags for the local butchers, cake labels, and stickers for soft drink bottles.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald commended City Printing Works for its outstanding efforts over the years to preserve and make available its business history and artefacts.

“The Queensland Business History Award, part of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, recognises leadership in collecting, preserving and sharing corporate history and heritage collections,” Ms McDonald said.

Ms McDonald said that the Anderson family kept samples of their work over decades, which ensured historical items and business records have been archived and preserved.

“City Printing Works’ collection of printed material has been carefully stored, or is displayed in glass cabinets or frames in its modern-day office, which has not only has meant these heritage items have stood the test of time, but they are available for people today to view and learn from,” Ms McDonald said.

“And because City Printing Works has remained an Anderson family business since 1903, a lot of inherited knowledge and stories have been passed through the generations.”

An extensive collection of historical items and documents from City Printing Works are housed at the Rockhampton Heritage Village in a purpose-built print house replica, including hot metal typesetting machines and presses (a Miehle Vertical (1933), a Thompson Platen and a Heidelberg Platen), cardboard tags, labels, pamphlets, stickers, newsletters, posters and more.

City Printing Works also shares examples of historical work through Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and its website.

Ms McDonald said State Library of Queensland, as a state collector of Queensland’s history, valued the significant contribution City Printing Works has made to preserving local stories.

“These items have a lot of character — whether it’s a label that was printed for the local butcher, or a theatre program — and paint a picture of Rockhampton’s community and history over a more than one hundred year period, capturing fascinating memories and stories that help us understand what life has been like,” Ms McDonald said.

“State Library is committed to preserving Queensland’s memory and ensuring it is accessible now and for generations to come, and City Printing Works has done a remarkable job of adding their piece to Queensland’s collective story.”

Founded in 2009 by State Library of Queensland, Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School, the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame recognises the significant contributions by leading businesses and individuals to Queensland’s economic and social development.

For more information on the award and the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, visit leaders.slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries:

SLQ Communications

communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

3 Jul 2017

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Ministerial statement

New digital literacy program rolls out for Indigenous communities

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch today (Monday) announced Queensland’s remote and regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will receive digital literacy training.

Speaking during NAIDOC Week celebrations, Ms Enoch said the new Deadly Digital Communities program will be delivered through the State Library of Queensland, Telstra and local councils.

Ms Enoch said the program will see community based training and professional development delivered to 26 regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Queensland.

“This is a huge step towards closing the gap and improving the digital inclusion of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Ms Enoch said.

“It is programs like this that boost our state’s entrepreneurial culture, by giving all Queenslanders the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer Tim O’Leary said the company was committed to working with organisations such as the State Library of Queensland to improve digital inclusion across Queensland.

“As more and more services and daily interactions move online, being able to use digital technologies brings vital health, social and financial benefits – especially for Indigenous people in remote locations,” Mr O’Leary said.

“We believe digital literacy has become an essential skill in the digital age. At Telstra, we want to see all Australians connect, participate and interact in the digital world, irrespective of where they live. This is what this initiative is all about.”

Mr O’Leary said Telstra had expanded its network coverage to rural locations such as Aurukun and Burketown over the last few months, and that this project was another example of Telstra’s ability to work with the government to deliver innovative programs to regional and rural Australia.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said Deadly Digital Communities was indicative of the innovative programs the State Library delivered in collaboration with public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres throughout Queensland.

“Deadly Digital Communities will help realise the often untapped potential of these unique and vibrant communities,” she said.
“Participants will learn about everything from sending an email to using social media to connect with family or to promote a business idea.”

Ms McDonald said digital inclusion was vital in helping communities reap the immense social and economic benefits of the digital world.

Deadly Digital Communities will commence in September and will roll out over two years to the communities of Aurukun, Cherbourg, Hope Vale, Lockhart River, Palm Island, Pormpuraaw, Wujal Wujal, Woorabinda, Bamaga, Injinoo, New Mapoon, Seisia and Umagico.

Another 13 Indigenous Knowledge Centres and remote public libraries will soon be added to the program.

Deadly Digital Communities is an initiative of the State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

MEDIA
Minister Enoch: 0412 393 909
State Library of Queensland - Kylie Roots, communications@slq.qld.gov.au, 07 3842 9847
Telstra – Anna Erbrederis anna.erbrederis@team.telstra.com, 03 9240 9478

1 Jul 2017

$2,000 on offer for Queensland’s next great young writer

$2,000 on offer for Queensland’s next great young writer

Entries are now open for State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) annual Young Writers Award competition, offering $2,000 for the best short story from a young writer.

Now in its 22nd year, the competition aims to launch the careers of the next generation of great Australian writers.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the Young Writers Award has become an integral part of uncovering young, creative writing talent in Queensland.

“State Library’s Young Writers Award has a long history of finding the future stars of Queensland’s writing community and giving them a head-start — from Rebecca Jessen and Chris Somerville to Benjamin Law and Tara June Winch,” Minister Enoch said.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said State Library hoped the competition would continue to foster young writers and introduce them to the publishing industry.

“The Young Writers Award helps writers find their voice, and gives them the confidence to work towards their literary aspirations,” Ms McDonald said.

“In 2017 we are also proud to announce the inaugural Young Writers Conference held at SLQ in November, at which competition entrants and other aspiring young writers will have the opportunity to partake in a full day of skill and knowledge-building workshops, advice and support giving, and networking.”

The 2017 winners of the Young Writers Award will be announced by Minister Enoch at an awards ceremony following the conference.

The competition is open to Queensland residents aged 15 to 25 years into two categories: 15 to 17 years (1,500 words) and 18 to 25 years (2,500 words).

The winner of the 18 to 25 years category receives $2,000 prize money, and the winner of the 15 to 17 years category receives $500.

Runners up and highly commended entrants are also awarded prizes including prize money, gift vouchers and book packs.

All prize winners also receive a membership to Queensland Writers Centre.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/awards for guidelines and entry forms, and to read past winning stories.

Entries close at 5pm on Thursday 31 August.

The Young Writers Award is presented by State Library of Queensland with support from Queensland Writers Centre.

Media enquiries:

Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications

07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

2 Jun 2017

Memory Awards winners help preserve Queensland’s history

Memory Awards winners help preserve Queensland’s history

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) last night announced the recipients of its 2017 fellowships and awards at the Queensland Memory Awards ceremony, an annual event that acknowledges excellence in research and the creation of new knowledge about the state’s history.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said State Library through the John Oxley Library offered fantastic opportunities for further research into our history and she applauded the winners for their contributions.

“These research initiatives reveal new things about our identity as people and communities living in Queensland and play an important part in shaping our future,” Ms Enoch said.

“Very often the work of historians and researchers goes unnoticed by the public, but through these awards we acknowledge their contributions and shine a light on wonderful stories and information that we hope will encourage more people to explore and share our rich and varied history.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that the fellowship program helps to highlight and activate SLQ’s rich collections and range of resources, as well as contribute new knowledge about Queensland.

“By working closely with State Library, our fellows will bring our collections to life and will contribute new research about our state’s vast history across a range of mediums including blog posts, oral histories, digital stories, and more,” Ms McDonald said.

This year, nine awards and fellowships were presented, with a collective prize pool of more than $110,000.

The 2017 award winners are:

  • John Oxley Library Award — Dr Spencer Routh OAM

This award recognises excellence and innovation in the recording of Queensland history by an individual and was awarded to Dr Spencer Routh OAM for his distinguished career in the library and information sciences sector.

  • John Oxley Library Community History Award — Annerley Stephens History Group

Annerley Stephens History Group’s Frank Corley Project sees volunteers working with communities in Annerley and surrounding suburbs to collect local histories relating to the houses that were photographed in the area in the 1970s by Frank Corley.

  • John Oxley Library Fellowship ($20,000) — Dr Lauren Istvandity

Lauren’s project Reminiscing about jazz in Queensland: preserving pre-1965 oral histories for the Qld Jazz Archive collection in the John Oxley Library will see her record and collect new oral histories about the history of jazz in Queensland.

  • Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship ($15,000) — Toni Massey

As a commercial diver and marine archaeologist, Toni’s project will examine how Queensland pearl divers pioneered the pearl shelling industry and in doing so, contributed to Queensland’s economic development.

  • Mittelheuser Scholar-in-Residence ($15,000) — Tess Maunder

Tess’s project Curating ‘digital futures’ includes a selection of international case-studies examining the relationship between ‘digital futures’ and contemporary curatorial practice.

  • Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation Fellowships (4 x $15,000)

Dr Peter Crossman is the recipient of the 2017 Digital Fellowship for his project Cairns of words and umbers: Queensland’s memory rolls of the Great War. Peter will document the names, places and stories of soldiers from 100 of Queensland’s honour boards.

  • Lisa Jackson will examine the home front story of Stradbroke Island’s Inebriate Institution in her project The unfinished war: the post-war lives of returned soldiers who spent time in the Inebriate Institution in Dunwich.

  • During the Second World War General Douglas MacArthur called Brisbane the most corrupt place in the South Pacific. Dr Judith Powell’s project Crime, passion and opportunity – policing Brisbane during World War 2 investigates Brisbane during this volatile time.

  • Visual artist Greer Townshend’s project Treasure: a soldier’s story explores archetypal imagery found in letters diaries, photographs and possessions of Queensland soldiers during the First World War.

Media enquiries:

Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications

07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

31 May 2017

Rare Shakespeare manuscript comes to State Library

Shakespeare will be escorted to State Library of Queensland for a special one night only appearance on 6 June.

Australia’s only original copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio, on loan from the State Library of NSW, is considered one of the most influential books ever published in the English language.

Its South Bank showing is a coup for State Library as it is the first time the Bard’s folio has been shown in Queensland. The special event sold out within days of tickets going on sale.

“We are tremendously excited to have this literary masterpiece in Queensland,” State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said.

“This event is a Cultural Precinct collaboration between State Library and QPAC for their 2017 international series presentation of The Royal Ballet.

“It highlights the value of our partnerships with national and international cultural institutions and the importance of our donors who help make these special events happen,” Ms McDonald said.

The First Folio was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death, and features 36 of Shakespeare’s plays including The Tempest, Twelfth Night and The Winter’s Tale which might have otherwise been lost forever.

“We are delighted to offer library visitors a chance to gain special insights into this historic document with rare books expert Maggie Patton,” she said.

Ms Patton will lead a page turning discussion of the folio explaining Shakespeare’s idiosyncrasies, the development of the English language and playwriting.

“There are no manuscripts of these plays available in the Bard’s own hand so the First Folio is the closest a reader can get to the original source,” Ms Patton said.

Following Ms Patton’s presentation, the backstory of some of the State Library’s own rare and remarkable treasures will be explored in celebration of Queensland Day.

Queen Victoria’s stockings to the mesmerising John Watts necklace, an extraordinary example of 19th-century goldsmith art, are just some of the rare treasures at State Library.

Presented by State Library of Queensland with the support of Queensland Library Foundation, and in association with the 2017 QPAC International Series presentation of The Royal Ballet.

For further media information and images please contact:  Dianne McKean | 07 3842 9847 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

26 Apr 2017

State Library exhibitions to explore civil rights in Queensland

State Library exhibitions to explore civil rights in Queensland

Question the notion of freedom, reflect on our collective past, and explore those civil rights won and lost at the State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) upcoming exhibitions.

Opening to the public on Friday 5 May are two complementary exhibitions exploring Queensland history: Freedom Then, Freedom Now and Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the exhibitions offer valuable insights into civil rights in Queensland.

“These exhibitions delve into our state’s recent past and reveal some of the significant legislative and cultural changes that have taken place in Queensland since the 1950s,” Ms Enoch said.

“Queensland has seen some major events in relation to personal liberties - from Eddie Mabo’s native title victory in 1992 to the anti-consorting laws introduced in 2013 - and these exhibitions offer Queenslanders the opportunity to learn more about both the historical facts and social context.

“There are Queenslanders alive today whose families have lived here for thousands of generations but when born here, were not counted as citizens in their own country until after the 1967 Referendum.

“We have many stories of activism and advocacy in Queensland that helped bring about the Referendum and the change in our Constitution, and these stories are represented in these exhibitions,” she said.

Freedom Then, Freedom Now draws on SLQ’s historical collections to journey into our recent past, explore the freedoms enjoyed and restricted in Queensland, and examine what happens when individual rights intersect with the collective good.

Curated by Emeritus Professor Peter Spearritt, Freedom Then, Freedom Now takes a uniquely Queensland look at freedoms won and lost in the state since the 1950s across a number of themes including censorship, marriage, citizenship, dress and travel.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that as custodian of Queensland’s collective memory, State Library of Queensland is uniquely placed to share insights into the state’s past.

“SLQ’s extensive collections house more than just published works, photographs and newspapers, with our repositories holding original materials and personally donated items as varied as clothing, signage, political ephemera, digital stories and even a cigarette case,” Ms McDonald said.

“These pieces tell a story unlike any other, and invite interpretations and individual reflections quite apart from the history recorded by formal institutions.”

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! commemorates the 1967 Referendum, a historic milestone for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rights, told through the eyes of Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA) alumni.

Ten years ago, ACPA developed Reflections: Referendum 40 years and to the future which was a creative response to the anniversary of the 1967 Referendum. In SLQ’s exhibition, the performers reflect on the creative process, research and the performance which shaped who they are today and their understanding of the campaign to be counted.

“The 1967 Referendum changed the course of Australian history and this exhibition shares that history from the personal perspective of Indigenous artists and creatives,” Ms McDonald said.

“Our partnership with ACPA for Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! is just one way in which we’re working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, community groups and individuals in Queensland to ensure their stories are collected, preserved and shared.”

Both exhibitions are free and open to the public from Friday 5 May until Sunday 1 October. For more information, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on.

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count! is presented in partnership with Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA).

Interviews and images are available upon request.

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | SLQ Communications
07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

Freedom Then, Freedom Now
5 May – 1 Oct 2017
Open daily 10am–5pm
Philip Bacon Heritage Gallery, level 4
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct
Free entry

Don’t Just Count Us, Let Us Count!
5 May – 1 Oct 2017
Open Mon–Thu 9am–8pm, Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–5pm
kuril dhagun, level 1
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct
Free entry

20 Apr 2017

State Library highlights Queensland women of the First World War

State Library highlights Queensland women of the First World War

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) has launched its latest display in the Talbot Family Treasures Wall, Duty and Care as part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program.

Duty and Care explores items from SLQ’s First World War collections, such as photographs, diaries and letters, preserved as powerful examples of Queensland women’s wartime involvement and experiences.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that the items on display provide an insight into the often untold contributions and sacrifices women made both on the home front and the war front.

“While there were limited opportunities for active service, women found creative and resourceful ways to participate and contribute to the war efforts,” Ms McDonald said.

“Some enlisted in the Australian Army Nursing Service and saw active service overseas. Others threw themselves into fundraising activities, volunteered to care for wounded soldiers, or protested for peace."

“While the items displayed in Duty and Care can never paint a complete picture, they can reveal private experiences and, as a collection, these personal mementos and accounts can provide a greater understanding of how women in Queensland experienced the First World War, both at home and overseas,” Ms McDonald said.

The SLQ Treasures Wall will feature a different themed exhibition for every year of the centenary of the First World War and provides an opportunity to explore and expose different aspects of Queensland’s war time experience.

SLQ and the John Oxley Library are the custodians of the state’s First World War history and these displays allow some of the precious collection items to be viewed, while providing greater context and understanding of how the First World War impacted Queenslanders.

Duty and Care is part of SLQ’s Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.

Duty and Care
12 April 2017 – 23 March 2018
Treasures Wall, Level 4, SLQ

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell | 07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au
State Library of Queensland Communications

7 Apr 2017

State Library explores our digital future

State Library explores our digital future

In 2017, State Library of Queensland (SLQ) will present a Digital Futures program of free tech play days, interactive exhibition and game lab, discussions, and workshops.

Elements of the digital landscape, in which we now learn, work and play, including adaptive technologies, education, robotics, new business models, social media, mobile technology, and virtual worlds, will be showcased, tested and discussed through the Digital Futures year-long program.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said that Digital Futures is about deepening understanding around digital innovation and digital literacy across Queensland.

“SLQ’s Digital Futures program highlights the importance of providing communities and businesses across the state with the skills and connectivity to thrive in the digital age, an initiative the Queensland Government is committed to achieving,” Ms Enoch said.

“Technology now reaches almost every aspect of our lives, and increased use of digital technologies is providing a range of new and exciting opportunities for Queensland – a state which has long been a hotspot for innovation and development.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that Digital Futures invites Queenslanders to immerse themselves in futurism, digital participation and our digital place.

“Technology has given us new tools through which to question, understand, re-imagine and contribute to communities and the world we live in.

“Most aspects of daily life have been altered by the digital age and the aim of Digital Futures is to explore the impacts and challenges of this, as well as the possibilities technology offers,” Ms McDonald said.

“Through Digital Futures and associated programming, we explore how technological advances are changing how we learn and access information, our economy, our environment, our leisure activities, the future of employment and the workforce, and how these changes are affecting us on a fundamental, human level,” Ms McDonald said.

The centre of the Digital Futures program is the interactive and intriguing Digital Futures Lab, housed in the SLQ Gallery. In this immersive space, visitors can experience cutting-edge technologies, have a virtual reality experience, engage with real-life robots and learn mindfulness from devices.

Visitors to Digital Futures Lab will receive information, hands-on tech experiences and be presented with provocative questions to prompt inquisitive thinking and perhaps spark the imagination.

A deeper experience of the Digital Futures Lab is currently offered each week at the Wednesday Play Day sessions. Visitors can try their hand at cutting-edge technologies such as HP Sprout which enables 3D scanning and digital mash-ups, or contribute to the interactive and ever-growing interactive art installation Hive Mind.

Digital Futures Lab is free and open in SLQ Gallery at State Library of Queensland until 5 November. For full Digital Futures programming details please visit http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/events/digital-futures.

Interviews and images are available upon request.

Media enquiries:
Hillary Bell, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

4 Apr 2017

Queensland Literary Awards open for entries to celebrate home grown writing talent

Queensland Literary Awards open for entries to celebrate home grown writing talent

Authors are now invited to enter the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards (QLA) and Queensland Writers Fellowships.

Entries are now open for these prestigious annual awards recognising the literary achievements of published and emerging Queensland and Australian authors.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said a strong focus of the QLA was supporting and promoting the professional success of Queensland’s talented writers and highlighting the importance of innovation in publishing in 2017.

“The QLA play an important role in discovering local writers and sharing their work with an Australian and global readership via print and digital media,” Ms Enoch said.

“State Library of Queensland (SLQ) leads the way in nurturing a reading culture in Queensland — something that is fundamental to an innovative and creative community.

“Through hosting these awards, SLQ is creating opportunities for emerging writers to develop work for publication and secure careers in the creative industries.”

The Queensland Government invests in the creative futures of Queensland’s writers with continuing support for the Awards, including the $25,000 Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance.

Young writers, 30 years and under, are encouraged to apply for one of two Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards, each to the value of $12,500.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald paid tribute to the many organisations that sponsor and champion the Queensland Literary Awards.

“We are grateful to have the continued support of key QLA partners including the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, QUT, Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail,” Ms McDonald said.

Nominations for the 2017 awards are being sought in the following categories:

  • Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance ($25,000)
  • Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Awards (two available, $12,500 each)
  • The University of Queensland Fiction Book Award ($10,000)
  • The University of Queensland Non-Fiction Book Award ($10,000)
  • Griffith University Young Adult Book Award ($10,000)
  • Griffith University Children’s Book Award ($10,000)
  • University of Southern Queensland History Book Award ($10,000)
  • University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection — Steele Rudd Award ($10,000)
  • State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection — Judith Wright Calanthe Award ($10,000)
  • QUT Digital Literature Award ($10,000)
  • Unpublished Indigenous Writer — David Unaipon Award (supported by the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund and UQP) ($10,000)
  • Emerging Queensland Writer — Manuscript Award (supported by UQP) ($10,000)
  • The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year Award ($10,000)

The awards also encompass the Queensland Writers Fellowships, each worth $15,000, awarded to three Queensland writers each year for professional development.

Nominations for the Queensland Literary Awards close at 5pm on Wednesday 31 May 2017. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in October.

For more information about the Queensland Literary Awards and Queensland Writers Fellowships or to download nomination forms, visit qldliteraryawards.org.au.

Media enquiries:
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au 07 3842 9084

20 Mar 2017

Pushing the boundaries of architecture at State Library

Pushing the boundaries of architecture at State Library

International architects will gather to discuss contemporary issues facing the profession, when the annual UQ Architecture lecture series returns to State Library of Queensland (SLQ) this autumn.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that this year’s series aims to push the boundaries of architecture in all its forms.

“In 2017, SLQ is exploring ‘digital futures’ and the potential impacts of technology on all aspects of our lives — from work and transport, to how we communicate, live and engage with the built environment,” Ms McDonald said.

“Previous lectures have focused on the impact of digital media on architecture and sustainability efficiencies due to new improved technologies. This year we look forward to hearing about experimental architectural processes beyond disciplinary constraints and how architects are leading the way in bringing about societal change through clever design.”

The University of Queensland School of Architecture senior lecturer and series curator Dr Kelly Greenop said the series showcases architects as social innovators exploring design and technical limits.

“In 2017 we’re celebrating innovative architectural practices from our own city, as well as the most esteemed architects working nationally at the moment,” Dr Greenop said.

“We are also pushing our regional boundaries out to embrace architecture in Asia. The Brisbane architectural community is keen to hear the design synergies and experiences from our near neighbours.”

For this year’s series, architects will travel from Sydney, Melbourne, Singapore, Indonesia, and as far as Turkey, with a host of local Brisbane designers completing the line-up.

Wenhui Lim from SPARK* architects will launch the series on 21 March, as part of the 2017 Asia Pacific Architecture Forum.

Lectures are held weekly on Tuesday evenings from 21 March to 23 May (excluding 18 and 25 April), with networking and refreshments prior to each session.

Architecture professionals attending the events will be eligible for two formal continuing professional development points (CPD) with the Australian Institute of Architects.

The UQ Architecture lecture series is partnership between SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library and The University of Queensland’s School of Architecture.

For more information about weekly speakers, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on. The lectures will be live streamed on the SLQ website for offsite viewers.

Date Tuesdays 21 Mar – 23 May 2017 (excl. 16 & 25 Apr), 6pm–8pm
Venue SLQ Auditorium 1, State Library of Queensland
Cultural Precinct, South Bank
Bookings Free, bookings slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

Media enquiries
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9084

Schedule of speakers

21 March
Wenhui Lim
SPARK (Singapore)

28 March
Melissa Liando
Csutoras & Liando (Indonesia)

4 April
Jeremy McLeod
Breathe Architecture (Melbourne)

11 April
Muge Belek and Frederico Fialho Teixeira
[f]FLAT (Brisbane)

No lectures 18 and 25 April

2 May
Melody Chen
Atelier Chen Hung (Brisbane)
Rebecca Caldwell and Emily Juckes
Maytree Studios (Brisbane)

9 May
Alexis and Murat Şanal
ŞANALarc (Turkey)

16 May
Chris Major (Sydney)
Welsh + Major

23 May
William Smart
Smart Design Studio (Sydney)

15 Mar 2017

Asia Pacific Architecture Forum returns to Brisbane

Asia Pacific Architecture Forum returns to Brisbane

The 2017 Asia Pacific Architecture Forum will be held in Brisbane from 18-31 March and is an initiative of Architecture Media and State Library of Queensland.

A highlight of the program for the 2017 Asia Pacific Architecture Forum is the keynote address of the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, a Pritzker Architecture Prize recipient.

The program will feature a range of free and ticketed events, including exhibitions, installations, symposia, lectures and workshops, which will engage architecture and design professionals, educators, enthusiasts, children and young people. Shigeru Ban will present his innovative and humanitarian architecture at the day-long ArchitectureAP Symposium on Friday 24 March 2017 at State Library of Queensland.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the two week program will showcase architecture’s pivotal role in the culture, sustainability and economy of the Asia Pacific region.

“State Library, through the Asia Pacific Design Library, is pleased to continue our partnership with Architecture Media to deliver this vibrant program of exhibitions and events, which shines the spotlight on the importance of architecture in our region.

“We are delighted that the Forum has become a vehicle for attracting high calibre international architects and designers to State Library. We are excited to again host this world class event and facilitate the critical discussions occurring in contemporary architecture,” Ms McDonald said.

Architecture Media’s Editorial Director Cameron Bruhn said that the Forum will present information that will enable architects, designers and planners to tackle the challenges of designing for future growth in the Asia Pacific region.

“The Forum’s founding partners, Architecture Media and State Library of Queensland, are working collaboratively with business, government and cultural institutions from across the region to explore and celebrate the innovative thinking and transformative projects creating new world cities for the emerging Asian century,” Mr Bruhn said.

Highlights of the 2017 Forum include: the ArchitectureAP Symposium, a conference featuring internationally renowned speakers; a Design Minds workshop; a free Little Designers architecture workshop; the UQ Architecture lecture series, featuring leading local, national and international architects; a Pecha Kucha night and many more.

For more information including the full program and booking details, visit aparchitectureforum.com.

For all Queensland media enquires please contact Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications:
communications@slq.qld.gov.au 07 3842 9084

15 Mar 2017

Queensland Literary Awards welcomes innovative digital literature prize in 2017

Queensland Literary Awards welcomes innovative digital literature prize in 2017

The Queensland Literary Awards today welcomes a new prize in 2017, celebrating digital literature in all forms.

Showcasing narrative innovation and new practice in contemporary literature by Australian writers, the QUT Digital Literature Award is an exciting new award that supports Queensland’s continued growth in the digital space.

Premier and Minister for the Arts Annastacia Palaszczuk welcomed the addition of a new digital literature award to the Queensland Literary Awards, which recognise outstanding writers, celebrate our stories and foster the next generation of writing talent across all literary genres and platforms.

“This new award recognises that increasingly our stories are not only told through the printed page, but are also published digitally, and read on our screens and devices.”

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch highlighted the importance of the award in showcasing innovation in publishing.

“Queensland is one of the global centres of innovation in digital writing and publishing, making this new prize a perfect addition to the major literary awards of our state,” Ms Enoch said.

“Digital media has given rise to new ways of telling stories and new devices through which readers can explore and fall in love with literature.”

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said State Library of Queensland is proud to present the Queensland Literary Awards, and thanked the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) for its generous sponsorship of this new award.

“Through QUT’s support, a cash prize of $10,000 has established the QUT Digital Literature Award as the world’s richest digital literary prize,” Ms McDonald said.

“In an increasingly digital world, State Library is focussed on enabling and supporting access to Queensland’s important stories of fact and fiction, both online as well as through the physical artefact.

“The QUT Digital Literature Award was established by State Library of Queensland to acknowledge contemporary publishing and digital innovation in storytelling.

“The Queensland Literary Awards demonstrate the strength of writing and publishing in Australia, and help to uncover and recognise the depth of creative talent we nurture here in Queensland.

“Queensland has always been home to a vibrant and passionate literary community and we are proud to continue supporting writing, publishing and reading, both in print and online,” Ms McDonald said.

The new annual award was announced today as part of the 2017 program for the Queensland Literary Awards, which will open for entries on 1 April.

The Queensland Literary Awards are presented by State Library of Queensland, and offer prizes for writers in thirteen categories across fiction, non-fiction and poetry for published and unpublished work.

The Queensland Literary Awards are supported by the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, The University of Southern Queensland, QUT, Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund and The Courier-Mail.

Full guidelines and entry details for all categories of the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards, including the new award, are available now at qldliteraryawards.org.au/about/guidelines. Entries open at 9am on Saturday 1 April.

Media contact
Shahedah Sabdia
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9084

25 Jan 2017

State Library offers research fellowships and residency totalling $110,000

State Library offers research fellowships and residency totalling $110,000

Applications are now open nationwide for State Library of Queensland’s (SLQ) annual research fellowships and residency, worth up to $20,000 each.

Applicants are encouraged to explore the state’s documentary heritage, with seven opportunities totalling $110,000 as part of the Queensland Memory Awards.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy Leeanne Enoch said the fellowships and residency allow Queensland’s diverse stories to be discovered, shared and preserved.

“Our collective stories stretch back more than 40,000 years and there is still so much to uncover about our state’s heritage, culture, places and people,” Ms Enoch said.

“Discovering and sharing these stories is key to enriching our understanding of Queensland — past and present. The Palaszczuk Government is proud to be supporting these awards and encouraging the creation and sharing of new knowledge.”  

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said that as the primary custodian of Queensland’s memory, the aim of the fellowship and residency program is to encourage diverse voices and new ways of interpreting collections. 

“The fellowships and residency are open to all, from researchers and academics, to artists, writers, musicians and more,” Ms McDonald said.

“In working closely with the library, fellows and residents bring SLQ’s rich and varied collections to life. Their research inspires us to think differently about our past, present and future.”  

The 2017 fellowships and residency are:

John Oxley Library Fellowship ($20,000 plus 12 months personal work space) — awarded to support a research project that uses the resources of the John Oxley Library.

This fellowship is made possible through the generous donations to the Queensland Library Foundation.

Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship ($15,000 plus six months personal work space) — awarded to support a research project that contributes to new knowledge of Queensland’s economic and/or business history.

This fellowship is an initiative of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, a partnership between SLQ, The Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School.

Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation, four fellowships, including one digital fellowship ($15,000 each plus 12 months personal work space) — to recognise and encourage new research and interpretations about Queensland’s involvement in the First World War or in any significant military campaign over the last 100 years.

The Q ANZAC 100 digital fellowship calls for applications that will develop a creative digital experience using digital content from SLQ and other collecting institutions. These fellowships are part of the Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation program and are proudly sponsored by the Queensland Government.


Mittelheuser Scholar-in-Residence ($15,000 plus broader collaborative experiences with peers based at other Queensland cultural and educational institutions) — to attract leading thinkers who will stimulate intellectual debate and give rise to innovative new services and strategies both within SLQ and more broadly throughout the cultural sector.

This residency is generously funded by Dr Cathryn Mittelheuser AM through the Queensland Library Foundation.

SLQ is hosting a Q ANZAC 100 Fellows talk with past fellowship recipients on Tuesday 28 February as well as a fellowship information and showcase night on the Thursday 9 March.

Applications for all fellowships and residencies open Wednesday 25 January and close Wednesday 29 March.

To submit an application, or for more information on any of the Queensland Memory fellowships and residency, please visit slq.qld.gov.au

The winners will be announced on Thursday 1 June in the lead up to Queensland Week at the annual Queensland Memory Awards ceremony at SLQ.

For further media information and images please contact:
Hillary Bell | 07 3842 9864 | communications@slq.qld.gov.au

3 Jan 2017

Free and fun holiday activities at State Library of Queensland

Free and fun holiday activities at State Library of Queensland

Visit State Library of Queensland (SLQ) these summer holidays and step into a world of imagination, storytelling and creative play for children, friends and families.

Inspired by The Children Who Loved Books by Queensland author and illustrator Peter Carnavas, the Knowledge Walk has been transformed with a vibrant pop-up play area and storytelling tent.

The 2017 program features craft activities, storytelling sessions with guest Queensland authors, family movie screenings, musical workshops, and more.

State Librarian and CEO Vicki McDonald said the summer holiday program for children is always a highlight on the SLQ calendar.

“It’s incredible to see the library come alive with children and families over the holiday period, sharing time together playing and learning,” Ms McDonald said.

“This year, our program is dedicated to celebrating the wonder of picture books and bringing stories and characters to life.”

“We invite families to come and spend some time at SLQ these school holidays — whether you drop by for the morning or stay the whole day — and help children build a love of reading and literature from a young age,” Ms McDonald said.

Queensland authors Peter Carnavas, Shannon Horsfall, Andrew King, Kate Knapp, and Christine Sharp will visit SLQ during January to host free storytelling sessions in the Knowledge Walk.

Children can also get moving and grooving in free musical sessions with Tim Jackman, Queensland author Chris Collin and his whacky puppet friend Funky Chicken, and the Junk Orchestra.

PROGAM: Summer holiday fun activities at State Library of Queensland
Until 20 Jan | Throughout SLQ | For children of all ages | Free | slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

  • Books and beats on the Queensland Terrace:
    • Junk Orchestra: Mondays and Thursdays, 5–20 Jan, 10am–11am & 12noon–1pm
    • Hickory Dickory Rock with Tim Jackman: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 3–20 Jan, 11am–12noon & 1pm–2pm
    • Funky Chicken — Chooks in Space with Chris Collin: 4 & 18 Jan, 10am–11am & 12noon–1pm
  • Free craft creation station:
    • Open daily from 10am–3pm  in the Knowledge Walk, level 1
    • Activities will change throughout January
    • Materials created by Queensland authors and illustrators Peter Carnavas, Shannon Horsfall, Kate Knapp, Lucia Masciullo and Christine Sharp
  • Free family film screenings:
    • Daily until 20 Jan, 10.30am–12noon & 1.30pm–3pm in SLQ Auditorium 2, level 2
  • Free guided play workshops in the Imagination Playscape:
    • Daily until 20 Jan, 10am–11am in The Parlour, level 1
    • Bookings slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on
  • Storytime in the Storytent:
    • Daily until 20 Jan, 10am–10.30am, 11.30am–12noon, 1pm–1.30pm in the Knowledge Walk, level 1
    • Guest author storytelling sessions:
      • Shannon Horsfall (Was Not Me): 3, 10 & 17 Jan
      • Andrew King (Engibear’s Dream and Engibear’s Bridge): 4 & 6 Jan
      • Christine Sharp (Bea and Sylvia): 11 Jan
      • Peter Carnavas (Blue Whale Blues, The Children Who Loved Books and The Last Tree in the City): 13 & 20 Jan
      • Kate Knapp (Ruby Red Shoes): 16 & 18 Jan

SLQ’s summer Story Lab paid workshops are also running until 20 January.

For older children, SLQ leads the free Summer Reading Club, delivered nationally through public libraries and Indigenous Knowledge Centres and online at summerreadingclub.org.au until 31 January.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for more information and to view the full summer holiday program, or check out the daily calendar to plan your visit.

Media enquiries
Melanie Pennisi, SLQ Communications
communications@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3842 9847

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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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