2014 media releases

For more information about any of these stories or about current or earlier releases, please contact Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

17 Jul 2014

Queensland Business History Award recipient announced

Queensland Business History Award recipient announced

The Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame announced the recipient of the 2014 Queensland Business History Award, the Birdsville Hotel.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the Queensland Business History Award, presented by Library Board of Queensland Chair, Professor Jan Thomas at the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Induction Dinner, recognises leadership in collecting, preserving and sharing business history.

“This award aims to raise awareness of the value of good record keeping and preservation and acknowledges businesses that protect and promote their corporate history and heritage collections,” Ms Wright said.

This year’s recipient, the Birdsville Hotel, is an iconic Queensland business that has a long and colourful history dating back to its establishment in 1884. The hotel’s diverse and voluminous collection is a living archive of the many people that have passed through its doors, and their experience of remote Queensland.

The hotel owners, Jo and Kym Fort and Nell and David Brook, along with their staff, demonstrate an intimate knowledge of the collection and use it to connect with their patrons, as the historical material is on display on the hotel’s interior walls.

Preserving business records helps co-create Queensland’s memory for future generations and State Library of Queensland encourages all businesses to get on board. “The Birdsville Hotel engages with the community and visitors on a daily basis to promote their collection, and even add to it where they can,” Ms Wright said.

“A visitor’s book in the hotel’s reception area encourages patrons to write about their own experience of the bush and make a contribution to local shared history.”

Photographs, leaflets, brochures, flyers, film, correspondence, ledgers, minute books, annual reports and oral histories all play a part in telling Queensland’s narrative.

This award encourages businesses and business leaders to elevate the importance of safeguarding their irreplaceable historical material.

Arts Minister Ian Walker said the Birdsville Hotel owners and their staff were keeping the history of more than the pub alive through their collection of mementoes and documents.

“The fortunes of the hotel are entwined with the story of Birdsville,” Mr Walker said.

“The Birdsville Hotel is a true Queensland icon and it’s important that its unique history is available to future generations.”

The Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame is a partnership between State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School.

For more information on the award and the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame visit www.halloffame.slq.qld.gov.au

Media enquiries: Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9803 | kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au


4 Jul 2014

Say G'day

Say ‘g’day’ in an Indigenous language for NAIDOC Week

Queenslanders are encouraged to greet each other in their local Indigenous language this NAIDOC Week for a new campaign promoting cultural awareness.

Say ‘g’day’ in an Indigenous language will run over the week of NAIDOC celebrations from 6–13 July 2014. Say ‘g’day’ invites Queensland communities to discover and use an Indigenous greeting from the traditional language of their local area.

Led by the Yugambeh Museum Language and Heritage Research Centre, in partnership with State Library of Queensland, and supported by Dreamworld Corroboree, The Smith Family Partnership Brokers, The City of Gold Coast and 91.7 ABC Gold Coast, Say ‘g’day’ supports a larger state-wide movement dedicated to the preservation of Queensland’s Indigenous languages.

State Librarian Janette Wright said participating in the campaign was a great way for Queensland communities to recognise the existence and importance of traditional Indigenous languages.

“Discovering local languages helps us connect with and better understand Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. This connection is what NAIDOC Week is all about,” Ms Wright said.

“Preserving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages is vital to ensuring a rich cultural future for our state. The survival of these languages is reliant on them being shared, which is the responsibility of all Queenslanders.”

More than 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages and dialects were once spoken in Queensland. Today only 50 of these continue to be spoken, fewer than 20 are used as first languages — predominantly in Far North Queensland and the Torres Strait ― and only two languages are categorised as ‘living’ or ‘thriving’.

Preserving and sharing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, knowledge and experiences is a key priority for State Library.

“Our focus goes beyond just documenting these languages as part of Queensland’s past; State Library is dedicated to ensuring traditional languages are not only remembered but are accessible for future generations,” Ms Wright said.

State Library of Queensland has been working with a network of Indigenous Language Centres, community organisations and other groups over a number of years to document, preserve and share Indigenous languages.

“Most recently we’ve charted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages spoken throughout Queensland through an interactive Indigenous languages map. Say ‘g’day’ spotlights Indigenous languages and provides a way for people to connect with Queensland’s Indigenous cultures. Without being valued, heard and spoken today, these languages are at risk of being forgotten, and with them, some of the richness of Queensland’s living culture and memory,” Ms Wright said.

Rory O’Connor, Director of the Yugambeh Museum said that Say ‘g’day’ is part of a cultural activation program called ‘Yugambeh Mobo’, which is a community movement to connect the population of Queensland to local Aboriginal stories, language, tastes and culture through a series of annual events.

All Queensland communities are encouraged to get behind the Say ‘g’day’ campaign during NAIDOC Week.


Word lists with greetings from more than 25 Indigenous languages across Queensland are available on the State Library of Queensland website www.slq.qld.gov.au and Yugambeh Museum website www.yugambeh.com.

For more information on the Say ‘g’day’ campaign and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages, visit slq.qld.gov.au/resources.

Say ‘g’day’ was developed through State Library’s Indigenous Languages project which is supported by funding from the Indigenous Languages Support Program (ILS) from the Australian Government Attorney-General Department, Ministry for the Arts.

Media enquiries
Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications 07 3842 9803 | kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au

Useful links
G’day word lists in Indigenous languages
Indigenous languages map of Queensland
Information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages

27 Jun 2014

Young Writers Award 2014

Last chance to enter Young Writers Award

Aspiring young writers have until 18 July to enter their short story in State Library of Queensland’s Young Writers Award for a chance to win $2000.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the prestigious competition, open to Queensland residents aged 18 to 25, encouraged young wordsmiths to channel their creativity and share their stories.

“The annual short story competition is a great opportunity for emerging and aspiring writers to gain exposure and receive invaluable professional development opportunities. Queensland is home to many talented young creatives, and it is competitions like the Young Writers Award that help unearth that talent, providing the support and encouragement needed to further their careers,” Ms Wright said.

“Whether you’re a notepad scribbler, a creative writing student, or just have a great story to tell, I encourage you to let the words flow and see where it takes you,” said Ms Wright.

If you’re thinking of entering, here are some tips on how to get noticed.

  • Be confident in your writing, relax and don’t try too hard
  • Use language that comes naturally to you
  • The judges are looking for stories with distinctive and interesting characters and plots – so first get to know who your characters are and where your plot is going, and the language will follow.
  • They’re all good ideas, but don’t try to cram them all into one piece. Think about your core themes and characters and stick by them; your loyalty will pay off in the end.

The Young Writers Award closes at 5pm on Friday 18 July, 2014. For more details, and to read some of the past winning stories, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on

The Young Writers Award is funded by the Library Board of Queensland, and supported by Queensland Writers Centre, Brisbane Writers Festival, and the Australian Writer’s Marketplace.

Media enquiries
Alexia Saeck, Communications, State Library of Queensland
alexia.saeck@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3840 7784

11 Jun 2014

Poetry Slam 2014

The search begins for Queensland’s best spoken word poet

Queensland rappers, rhymers and poets are invited to bring their words to the stage as the 2014 Australian Poetry Slam competition tours the state.

Poetry Slams are electric live events, featuring a broad range of writing and performance styles, where contestants have two minutes on stage to impress the audience with a spoken word performance of an original poem.

State Librarian Janette Wright said State Library will take the Queensland heats of the Australian Poetry Slam competition to nine locations in the search for Queensland’s best slam poet.

“Working with public libraries and communities throughout Queensland, the competition aims to draw out local talent from all around the state, giving a platform to local voices and offering the opportunity to compete against Australia’s best at the state and national finals,” said Ms Wright.

The Queensland leg of the Australian Poetry Slam will visit Mackay, Goondiwindi, Rockhampton, Cairns, Logan, Moreton Bay, Cloncurry, Thursday Island and Brisbane to unearth local talent. Free workshops will be held in each location prior to the heat, to help competitors polish their performance before they hit the stage.

The Queensland competition will culminate in a State Final at State Library in September, where two finalists from each heat will be invited to compete. The State Champion and Runner Up will then travel to Sydney to compete for the Australian title later in the year.

Wordsmiths of all genres are encouraged to compete with the lure of $12,000 of cash and prizes on offer.
Ms Wright encouraged both seasoned slam poetry enthusiasts and those new to the art form to get involved in the competition.

“Slam poetry is a truly diverse form of expression that demonstrates the power of words. In previous years the competition has revealed extraordinary talent from all walks of life. You never know where this year’s champion will be discovered.”

“Whether you have aspirations to get up on stage and have a go at the championship or simply want to sit back and be inspired by the brave voices that emerge ― come along and get involved!” Ms Wright said.

All Queensland Poetry Slam heats are free to attend and enter; however, bookings are essential to guarantee your spot.

For more information and full heat details, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/awards/poetryslam.

The Queensland tour of the Australian Poetry Slam 2014 is coordinated by State Library of Queensland in partnership with local public libraries and regional arts organisations.

Media enquiries: Nicole Mangelsdorf, SLQ Communications t. 07 3842 9084 | Nicole.Mangelsdorf@slq.qld.gov.au

6 Jun 2014

StoryLab winter workshops

Popular holiday workshops return to State Library

Children aged 8 to 14 can explore the world of digital technology these winter holidays with State Library’s fun, hands-on Story Lab workshops.

Story Lab runs from 30 June to 11 July with exciting new workshops using creative programs including Story Scrapbook and MaKey MaKey, plus the very popular Scratch and stop motion animation workshops.

State Librarian Janette Wright said Story Lab workshops are a winter holiday favourite and encourage children to be creative and use their imagination to create stories using more than just words.

“Run by industry professionals, these workshops are specially designed to cater for different age groups (ages 8 to 11 and ages 11 to 14) and various learning styles,” Ms Wright said.

“Story Lab is a fun program that develops children’s literacy, creativity and social skills in an interactive way. Creative children’s workshops add to their cognitive, language and emotional development and build capacity for lifelong learning, and Story Lab makes for a fun holiday experience.”

Young creatives will enjoy a range of new workshops that will develop their digital technology skills in a supportive, positive and informal learning environment.

The day-long workshop series will run from 9.30am to 3.30pm each day (Monday to Friday) and all materials are supplied.

Tickets for all the Story Lab workshops are now on sale for $70 each.

Visit slq.qld.gov.au for more information and bookings.

Media enquiries:
Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications p 07 3842 9803, e kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au

2 Jun 2014

Queensland Memory Awards 2014

State Library celebrates Queensland Memory Awards

State Library of Queensland has honoured five award recipients through its annual Queensland Memory
Awards program.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the Queensland Memory Awards, supported by the Queensland Library
Foundation, recognise important new contributions to the state’s history and documentary heritage.

“These awards offer those with a keen interest in Queensland history the opportunity to use the materials
in the John Oxley Library to uncover our state’s untold stories,” Ms Wright said.

The 2014 award recipients are: Thomas Blake (John Oxley Library Fellowship — 12 months residency in
the John Oxley Library), Madeleine King and Nadia Buick (Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame
Fellowship — 6 months residency in the John Oxley Library), Richard Stringer (John Oxley Library Award),
and Adopt a Digger (John Oxley Library Community History Award).

Presented by the Governor of Queensland, Ms Penelope Wensley AC, the inaugural Queensland Business
Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship was awarded to Madeleine King and Nadia Buick for their proposed
project High Street Histories: Queensland’s fashion business leaders, while the recipient of the prestigious
John Oxley Library Fellowship, supported by the Queensland Library Foundation, is Thomas Blake for his
proposed project Liquid Gold: the history of the Great Artesian Basin in Queensland.

“High Street Histories is described by the judging panel as creative, innovative, engaging; it has the
potential to change people’s minds about business history,” Ms Wright said.

“This online project will examine Queensland’s fashion business history and map approximately 12 key
fashion sites throughout the state with an aim to link these sites to the communities around them.

The judging panel believe well-known historian Thomas Blake’s project Liquid Gold will be of great public
interest as the project documents the history of the Great Artesian Basin, with a focus on its social and
economic impacts.

Thomas plans to expand on his 2006 historical overview of the Great Artesian Basin and explore the
effects on areas such as pastoral industries, towns and settlements, Indigenous groups, health, and
recreation.”

Louise Denoon, Executive Manager Queensland Memory, said an extensive list of candidates was
compiled in the search for the John Oxley Library Award and John Oxley Library Community History Award
recipients.

“Distinguished architectural photographer Richard Stringer was presented the John Oxley Library Award
for his work in documenting Queensland’s landscape and architecture heritage over the past 40 years,” Ms
Denoon said.

“Richard is renowned for his ability to capture the significance and spirit of structures and places in his
photographs and his work has been featured in various landmark publications and exhibitions.”

The John Oxley Library Community History Award, supported by the Queensland Library Foundation, has
been granted to Adopt a Digger, a voluntary community project that commemorates the Sunshine Coast
region’s men and women who served during the First World War.

“Local residents, historians, school students and descendants are encouraged to ‘adopt a digger’, research
the person’s military history and upload this information to the website,” Ms Denoon said.

“This is an outstanding example of a voluntary community project with over 1,300 diggers adopted by the
community so far.”

Fellows, researchers, writers, filmmakers, academics, artists and storytellers have delved into thousands of
original materials in the John Oxley Library for many years. The Queensland Memory Awards offers the
rare opportunity to celebrate excellence in this research and recognise new contributions to Queensland’s
documentary heritage.

For more information on the Queensland Memory Awards visit www.slq.qld.gov.au.

Interview opportunities:
2014 John Oxley Library Fellowship
Thomas Blake

2014 Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship
Madeleine King and Nadia Buick

2014 John Oxley Library Award
Richard Stringer

2014 John Oxley Library Community History Award
Chrissy Fletcher
Adopt a Digger

Media enquiries:
Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications
e: kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au, p: 07 3842 9803

19 May 2014

Young Writers Award

Got a story to tell? Young wordsmiths have a chance to win $2,000

Aspiring young writers are invited to enter State Library of Queensland’s annual Young Writers Award for the chance to win $2,000.

Now in its nineteenth year, the Young Writers Award is continuing to foster the next generation of Queensland’s budding writing talent, with entries open to Queensland residents aged 18 to 25.

The Award has helped kick-start the literary careers of many prominent Queensland authors, including Christopher Currie (The Ottoman Motel), Alasdair Duncan (Sushi Central), Chris Somerville (We Are Not the Same Anymore), Benjamin Law (The Family Law) and Tara June Winch (Swallow the Air).

State Librarian Janette Wright said that these success stories are instrumental in encouraging other young wordsmiths.

“The flourishing careers of previous winners, runners up and entrants from the Young Writers Award have inspired confidence and determination in future writers,” she said.

2013 winner Kahli Scott’s winning short story Lingerie has since been featured on Birdee, an online magazine for young girls, and Kahli has begun work on a novel-length project that expands on the themes and tone of Lingerie using a new set of characters.

Rebecca Jessen, 2012 winner, went on to win Emerging Queensland Author at the 2013 Queensland Literary Awards for her manuscript submission Gap, a verse novel adaption of her Young Writer’s Award entry that will be published in September 2014.

Rebecca said that winning the Young Writers Award is what gave her the confidence to turn Gap into a full length novel.

Arts Minister Ian Walker said the Young Writers Award is a great initiative which gives emerging and aspiring writers the chance to increase their exposure to the publishing industry.

“Competitions like this are important as they provide our young creative talent with the support needed to help further their literary careers,” Mr Walker said.
The 2014 submissions will be assessed by a judging panel comprised of local authors, journalists and editors, including Frances Whiting (Sunday Mail columnist), Simon Groth (Concentrate), Ellen van Neerven (2013 David Unaipon Award winner) and Jarryd Luke (Director, Townsville Writers & Publishers Centre Inc).

The Young Writers Award winner and first runner up will receive $2,000 and $500 prize money respectively, along with a 12 month membership to the Queensland Writers Centre and the Australian Writer’s Marketplace online, and admission to a Brisbane Writers Festival seminar and Queensland Writers Centre industry seminar.

Entries close at 5pm on Friday 18 July 2014.  For full details on the application process or to pick up short story writing tips, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/awards/ywa

The Young Writers Award is funded by the Library Board of Queensland, and supported by Queensland Writers Centre, Brisbane Writers Festival, and the Australian Writer’s Marketplace.

Media enquiries
Alexia Saeck, SLQ Communications 07 3840 7784 | alexia.saeck@slq.qld.gov.au

19 May 2014

Australia’s best children’s bookseller at State Library

Australia’s best children’s bookseller at State Library

Julie Melville, Assistant Manager of State Library of Queensland’s Library Shop, has been awarded for her outstanding children’s bookselling by the Australian Booksellers Association.

The annual Guild Insurance Elizabeth Riley Fellowship for Children’s Bookselling was announced last night at the Australian Booksellers Association Gala dinner, along with numerous other national industry awards.

The Minister for Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts Ian Walker has congratulated Julie on winning this prestigious award.

“I commend Julie on this great achievement and her obvious commitment to instilling and encouraging a love of reading in our young people,” Mr Walker said.

“State Library does a lot of wonderful work in the area of children’s literacy through its programs throughout the state. It is passionate people such as Julie who help make the Library’s goal of touching young lives through reading a reality.” 

State Librarian Janette Wright said the award was an honour for both Julie and State Library.

“We are thrilled to have one of the country’s best children’s booksellers here at SLQ, sharing her love for reading with children every day,” Ms Wright said.

Julie is extremely dedicated to her work in the Library Shop, and believes that instilling a passion for reading at a young age is imperative.

“Once a child learns to love books, this becomes a lifelong affair that will carry them through anything life throws at them — the world of the book becomes a place you can always escape to,” she said.

Julie began her first job in bookselling in 1973, working part-time at The Book Nook, her mother’s Brisbane book store specialising in children’s literature.

In the 40 years since, Julie has worked at bookshops across the city, starting her current job at the Library Shop in November 2006 when State Library of Queensland reopened after a building redevelopment.

As the sole children’s book buyer, Julie has transformed the children’s books section from a single shelf to one of the top selling categories that attracts both regular customers and visitors to State Library’s The Corner family space and school holiday programming, such as the Top Secret Storytellers Clubhouse.

State Library of Queensland also runs numerous children’s literacy programs, including the national Summer Reading Club, and the family literacy programs Dads Read and Read4Life.

To see Julie’s curated range of children’s books, visit the Library Shop on level 1 of State Library of Queensland at South Bank, or view a selection online at shop.slq.qld.gov.au.

For more information on State Library of Queensland’s children’s reading activities and programs, visit slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/programs.

 

Media enquiries
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications 07 3842 9847 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

19 May 2014

Indigenous writers

Queensland leads the way in supporting Indigenous writers

Two exciting new works of fiction by Indigenous authors will be published through State Library of Queensland’s 2014 black&write! Indigenous Writing Fellowships.

Minister for Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts Ian Walker announced first-time author Adrian Stanley and distinguished playwright Jane Harrison as the two 2014 black&write! Indigenous Writing Fellows.

“Once again the competition has revealed an exceptional range of Indigenous literary talent from across Australia,” Mr Walker said.

“Adrian balances a fly-in fly-out mining job with care for his disabled children and lives in Adelaide. His winning manuscript Could be Worse is a comical tale of colourful characters in a small country town and is Adrian’s first novel.”

“Jane Harrison is an established playwright whose works have been performed in Australia and internationally. Her winning manuscript Becoming Kirrali Lewis is a young adult novel,” Mr Walker said.

Each of the two fellowship prizes are worth $10,000, and include a publishing deal with leading Australian Indigenous publishing house Magabala Books. The prizes were awarded following the national competition for published or emerging Indigenous authors of fiction.

Highly commended in the 2014 competition were Dylan Coleman from Adelaide for her novel Clear Water White Death, Siv Parker from Lismore for her novel On Dusk, and Alison Whittaker from Sydney for her poetry collection Lemons in the Chicken-Wire.

Now in its fourth year, the black&write! project was launched to train, mentor and promote outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers and editors and encourage a love of reading, writing and ideas in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

State Librarian Janette Wright said that since the project’s launch in 2010, black&write! continues to foster a thriving Indigenous Australian writing community.

“A national project and the first of its kind in Australia, black&write! continues to demonstrate the value and importance of Indigenous Australian literature,” said Ms Wright.

“Queensland is leading the way in supporting and developing outstanding Indigenous literary talent and making it accessible to the Australian and international public.”

black&write! is supported by State Library of Queensland and publishing partner Magabala Books.

Entries for the 2015 fellowships close 30 January 2015. Visit slq.qld.gov.au for conditions of entry.

Media enquiries:
Nicole Mangelsdorf, SLQ Communications | 07 3842 9084 | Nicole.Mangelsdorf@slq.qld.gov.au

15 May 2014

Hot modernism

Modernism heats up at State Library from July

State Library of Queensland is unearthing the stories of Queensland’s mid-century architecture for its next major exhibition, which will launch in July.

Hot Modernism: building modern Queensland 1945-75, presented in partnership with The UQ School of Architecture, will invite visitors to explore Queensland’s past.

State Librarian Janette Wright said post World War Two was a period of immense change and development for Queensland.

“Influenced by a new found optimism there was a greater connection to the world and a desire for a new way of living — elements which were characterised in the modernist movement,” said Ms Wright. “It was an exciting era but little is currently identified or celebrated in Queensland’s design practice.”

Hot Modernism will be an engaging exhibition and events program which will explore and showcase the changing face of the Queensland landscape, revealing not only the stories of the architecture, but of the people who created, worked and lived in the buildings,” she said.

Visitors to the exhibition will be able to walk through a full-scale re-creation of a 1957 house, take a seat in a 1960s living room and examine 3D architectural models, original drawings and historical photographs from the time.

They will also be able to investigate international design challenges of transport, access, sustainability, community and look to future planning to inspire our community to build our city of the future through an interactive space Design our City.

Arts Minister Ian Walker said Queensland has a strong, independent identity, and was looking forward to seeing the origins of that identity celebrated and on display.

“From the iconic Riverside Expressway, to structures like the Torbreck apartment building in Highgate Hill, our past constantly surrounds us, but we don’t often take the time to look around and appreciate the fascinating history of our state."

“It’s particularly gratifying to see State Library of Queensland working together with The University of Queensland to re-ignite important conversations about the designs and development of yesterday, as we continue to define how we want to live today, and into the future,” said Minister Walker.

Hot Modernism will be on display at State Library of Queensland from 9 July to 12 October. Visit www.slq.qld.gov.au/hot-modernism for more details.

The project is supported by the Australian Research Council’s Linkage Project funding scheme, and project partners BVN Donovan Hill, Conrad Gargett Riddel – Ancher Mortlock Woolley and Wilson Architects.

Interviews and images available upon request.

Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson Publicity | 0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

17 Mar 2014

Spotlight on architecture at SLQ

Spotlight on architecture at State Library

The popular UQ architecture lecture series returns to State Library of Queensland to ignite discussion and debate around the role of architecture in the 21st century.

The series, now in its fourth year, invites leading architects to share and discuss new ideas and knowledge centred on the role of architecture and design in the Asia Pacific.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the practice of architecture and the design of the built environment had a profound impact on everyday life.

“Through provocative discussion, we’re challenging people to consider the role of architecture in society and the implications of design on the built environment to the social, economic and environmental well-being of the planet,” said Ms Wright.

“This year we’re excited to livestream each event, opening up the dialogue to audiences right across Queensland, and even around the world” she said.

“A video recording of the weekly discussions will also be published on designonline.org.au along with further reading notes and a review of each event.”

Arts Minister Ian Walker said it was wonderful to see the partnership between State Library’s Asia Pacific Design Library and UQ’s School of Architecture continue to flourish.

“Events such as this bring together industry professionals, academics and the wider general public and provide a great opportunity for discussion and engagement,” said Mr Walker.

Senior Lecturer at UQ School of Architecture, John de Manincor said this year, the series is themed around ‘720+’, after the Dewey Decimal system code for architecture.

“There are parallels between the tasks of an architecture school and the role of the contemporary library. More than just being places where one finds existing, static information, they are places that generate new knowledge,” he said.

“We’re building on this relationship through the series, bringing together leading designers and thinkers, award-winners and provocateurs who are each engaged in the generation of new knowledge and will give the audience something to think about,” said Mr de Manincor.

The UQ Architecture lecture series will take place every Tuesday from 25 March until 20 May, with refreshments and networking from 6pm.

The first lecture will welcome Finn Pederson and Martyn Hook from iredale pedersen hook (VIC and WA) to the stage, followed by Penny Collins and Huw Turner (Collins and Turner Architects) on 1 April.

Architecture professionals attending the events will be eligible for two formal continuing professional development points (CPD) through the Australian Institute of Architects ‘Refuel’ program.
For details on upcoming speakers visit designonline.org.au

Date: Tuesdays, 25 Mar – 20 May (excl 22 Apr), 6pm for 6.30pm start
Venue: State Library of Queensland
Entry: Free, bookings slq.eventbrite.com
Media enquiries: Alexia Saeck, SLQ Communications 07 3840 7784 | alexia.saeck@slq.qld.gov.au

10 Mar 2014

Jay Laga'aia

Jay Laga’aia live in Mackay and Moranbah for Read4Life

Famous children’s entertainer and Australian film icon Jay Laga’aia will perform two FREE live shows in Mackay and Moranbah for local kids to explore the world of reading at the Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre on 15 March and the Moranbah Community Centre on 16 March.

Well known for his roles on Play School and films including Nim’s Island and Star Wars, Jay wrote and recorded his first children’s album Come Dance and Sing in 2007.

Saturday with Jay in Mackay and Sunday with Jay in Moranbah are part of Read4Life – a community-based early literacy program designed to build awareness and understanding of the importance of reading to children under the age of five.

The free hour-long shows start at 10am and 2pm include time for Q&A with Jay and the opportunity to meet him afterwards. Bring your lunch and join Jay and the Read4Life team for a picnic between shows. Tickets are essential for all shows.

State Librarian Janette Wright said State Library was delighted to be working with Jay as part of the Read4Life initiative.

She said, “Jay is a great supporter of Read4Life and strongly supports its message about reading to young children as a way to improve childhood development outcomes.”

“BHP Billiton Mitsui Coal (BMC) has partnered with State Library of Queensland to develop and deliver Read4Life in Mackay and Moranbah.”

“Read4Life is also supported by Isaac and Mackay Regional Councils who are instrumental in delivering this program into our communities.”

BMC’s Asset President Jacqui McGill said the Read4Life program encourages parents, especially fathers, to read to their young children.

She said, “Reading to children enhances their literacy and educational outcomes – as little as 10 minutes a day can make a real difference.”

Tickets for the Mackay shows are available online from the Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre.

Even if you are not attending a show you are welcome to bring a picnic along to the Mackay Civic Precinct and have lunch with Jay from 12.30pm. Tickets are not required for the picnic lunch.

Tickets for the Moranbah shows are available from Isaac Regional Council libraries across the region and must be collected. You can join Jay and the Read4Life team for a picnic lunch from midday at the Ted Rolfe Oval Park next to the community centre. A sausage sizzle and activities for children will be provided. Tickets are not required for the picnic lunch.

Jay will also be visiting local schools and hosting performance workshops for teens during his visit.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the inspiration for the Read4Life program was the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) which identified approximately a quarter of all Queensland children as developmentally vulnerable.

She said, “Read4Life is a community based response to the AEDI findings.”

“The program is deeply embedded in the community with local steering groups established and professional development sessions run for parents and carers and for professionals working with young children.”

“With such strong community support we’re confident the program will continue to make a positive difference into the future.”

The Australian Early Development Index is a population measure of children’s development as they enter their first year of formal school. Information for the AEDI is collected through a teacher-completed checklist that measures five areas of early childhood development. These five areas, or domains, are closely linked to the predictors of adult health, education and social outcomes: physical health and wellbeing, social competence, emotional maturity, language and cognitive skills (school-based), and communication skills and general knowledge.

Event Summary:

Read4Life Mackay
Date: Saturday, March 15
Show times: 10am and 2pm
Tickets: Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre www.mackaytix.com.au or call 4961 9777

Read4Life Moranbah
Date: Sunday, March 16
Show times: 10am and 2pm
Tickets: Isaac Regional Council Libraries or call 4941 4534

Media enquiries: Cathy Stacey, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9346 | cathy.stacey@slq.qld.gov.au

10 Mar 2014

Library Board of Queensland welcomes new members

Library Board of Queensland welcomes new members


State Librarian Janette Wright today welcomed Professor Jan Thomas as the new Chair of the Library Board of Queensland.

Ms Wright said, “The State Library is internationally recognised as a 21st century library and we’re looking forward to working with Professor Thomas and the newly constituted Board as we progress our vision for the future.”

“Professor Thomas has had a distinguished academic career including senior roles at Murdoch University, the University of Notre Dame Australia – and now as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southern Queensland. I am also delighted that we have a strong advocate for regional Queensland on the Board.”

Also joining the Board this year are Heather Linaker, Professor Andrew Griffiths (University of Queensland) and Adjunct Professor (University of the Sunshine Coast) Joan Sheldon AM.

Ms Wright said the new members each brought valuable skills to the Board.

“Ms Linaker brings a wealth of experience from the publishing sector after 19 years at John Wiley & Sons including over two years as Managing Director of the Australian operations,” she said.

Professor Andrew Griffiths will bring a range of valuable business skills including corporate sustainability and change to the Board and to State Library of Queensland.”

“Professor Griffiths is Academic Dean and Head of School at University of Queensland Business School,” she said.

“After a successful career in government, champion of the Arts Adjunct Professor Sheldon will also join the Board this year.”

Arts Minister Ian Walker welcomed the appointments of the new Chair and board members.

“I am confident the new Library Board will lead the State Library to continued success in partnering with Queensland communities and providing access to information and knowledge for Queenslanders to support our Arts for all Queenslanders strategy,” Mr Walker said.

Mr Walker thanked Professor Emeritus Roly Sussex OAM who has served in the role of Chair since 2009 and will continue with the Library Board as a member.

“I acknowledge Roly’s outstanding leadership as Chair. His experience will continue to serve the Library Board well,” Mr Walker said.

Mr Walker thanked outgoing board members Helen Brodie, Ruth Drinkwater, Maxwell Lenoy, Lynette McLaughlin, Jane Power and Professor Stuart Cunningham for their significant contribution to the State Library’s many achievements.

Reappointed members of the Library Board of Queensland include linguistics expert Professor Roly Sussex (The University of Queensland), Scott Reid (Regional Manager Queensland/Northern Territory/Papua New Guinea, Cisco Systems), Matthew McDonnell (Partner, KPMG), and Dr Grace Sarra (Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology).

Media enquiries: Cathy Stacey, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9346 | cathy.stacey@slq.qld.gov.au

19 Feb 2014

Queensland business leaders share their secrets

Queensland business leaders share their secrets

State Librarian Janette Wright today announced the return of Game Changers — the popular talk series with Queensland entrepreneurs at State Library of Queensland (SLQ).

Game Changers is a Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame initiative presented by SLQ, the Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School, and kicks off in March with a variety of inspiring speakers.

Hear the insights and secrets of innovation leaders from business, technology and creative industries, including Founder and Chief Technology Officer of Netbox Blue, Trent Davis; speech pathologist turned social entrepreneur, Dr Dimity Dornan AO; ‘godfather of Brisbane bar culture’ Damian Griffiths; and Group CEO and Managing Director of Domino’s Pizza, Don Meij.

Arts Minister Ian Walker said Game Changers offers a rare opportunity to hear first-hand from local business leaders on how they build companies, reinvent themselves, inspire teams and envision success.

“Facilitated by Ray Weekes, Chair of The CEO Institute, Game Changers runs bi-monthly from March to September,” Minister Walker said.

“Each talk in the Game Changers series will be followed by a networking function, giving attendees a chance to make connections and talk about their ideas.”

The launch of the series begins with Netbox Blue Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Trent Davis. Trent was Ernst & Young’s 'Young Entrepreneur of the Year' in 2006 and named as one of the ‘Most Influential Australians under 30’ by FMH magazine.

State Librarian Janette Wright said Game Changers is just one of the many different ways that the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame celebrates Queensland’s outstanding business leaders.

“By continuously building audiences and communities of interest around Queensland’s business history, the Hall of Fame inspires new knowledge about our shared history,” Ms Wright said.

Game Changers is an initiative of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame which celebrates, records and retells the stories of outstanding Queensland business leaders and their contributions to the state, with new inductees announced annually.

For more information on the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame visit the website at halloffame.slq.qld.gov.au

Game Changers
In conversation with Trent Davis
Thur 19 Mar, 6pm–8pm | State Library of Queensland
Free, bookings required

Media enquiries: Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9847 | kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au

28 Jan 2014

State Library fellowships explore Queensland history

State Library fellowships explore Queensland history

State Library of Queensland's annual history research fellowships open today for applications from across Australia, announced State Librarian Janette Wright.

Generously supported by the Queensland Library Foundation, State Library's $20,000 John Oxley Library Fellowship has been awarded annually for the past ten years to celebrate excellence in research and recognise new contributions to Queensland’s documentary heritage.

"Over the past decade, the fellowship has allowed those with a keen interest in Queensland history to use the materials in the John Oxley Library to uncover our state’s untold stories," Ms Wright said.

"Alongside the monetary award, the fellow is allocated a personal workspace in the John Oxley Library for 12 months, granting them unparalleled access to collection items, as well as expert advice from State Library staff for the duration of their project."

New in 2014, the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship provides a researcher with $15,000 and a personal workspace within the John Oxley Library for six months.

Announced at last year's Queensland Memory Awards Ceremony, this fellowship is an initiative of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, a partnership between State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Library Foundation, and QUT Business School.

Ms Wright said, "The Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship provides a unique opportunity for a researcher to build on our knowledge of Queensland's business history."

Established in 2009, the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame celebrates stories of Queensland’s outstanding business leaders, and recognises their contributions to the state’s economic and social development.

"We consider both fellowships a perfect opportunity to create and record these rich stories for future Queenslanders, covering all aspects of our state's history including commerce and trade, mining, agriculture, military history, architecture and design — and much more," Ms Wright said.

The current John Oxley Library fellows, Kathleen Fallon and Matthew Nagas, are using State Library's collections for their project A Commemorative Pilgrimage of Significant Sites: The Australian South Sea Islanders from Tweed Heads to Torres Strait, which documents historic sites significant to Australian South Sea Islanders.

Kathleen and Matthew will give a public lecture at State Library on 20 February about their research findings and the significance of the project in light of last year's commemoration of 150 years of South Sea Islander contributions to Australia.

Applications for both fellowships close at 5pm on Monday 17 March, and the winners will be announced at the Queensland Memory Awards Ceremony on 29 May.

Visit www.slq.qld.gov.au for more information on the fellowships and the Queensland Memory Awards.

Media enquiries: Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications 07 3842 9847 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

17 Jan 2014

State Library welcomes new exhibition 'Our Dreaming: animating country'

State Library welcomes new exhibition Our Dreaming: animating country

State Library has been transformed into an explosion of colour for new exhibition Our Dreaming: animating country.
Large scale projections, three-dimensional art installations, augmented reality, hands-on activities and a wide range of animated films combine in the exhibition, which showcases stories from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Acting State Librarian Prashant Pandey says the exhibition carries a message about the importance of storytelling and the role of new technologies in continuing this tradition.

“State Library is dedicated to preserving Queensland’s diverse stories. Our Dreaming: animating country explores how new technologies have contemporised traditional storytelling, preserving these stories for future generations.”

Mr Pandey said that visitors are encouraged to leave their mark on the exhibition by way of interactive activities.
“There are opportunities for both the young and the young at heart to draw inspiration from the exhibition, bring their own stories to life and add them to the space for other visitors to discover.”

Our Dreaming: animating country takes place throughout the library until 9 June, with three exhibition spaces to explore.

SLQ Gallery has been transformed into a neon wonderland showcasing 18 animations from The Dreaming series by Aboriginal Nations Australia (ANA). The award-winning animation series is used widely as a teaching resource in Australian educational curricula.

Philip Bacon Heritage Gallery has been transformed into an animation studio, offering a behind the scenes glimpse of how animation artwork is created and providing an opportunity for visitors to try their hand at stop-motion and traditional two-dimensional animation.

Our Dreaming: animating country in the kuril dhagun space tells Indigenous stories through Indigenous voices. Featured are nine digital storytelling projects that have been carried out in recent years in Indigenous communities. The resulting films present a collection of retold traditional stories, new urban legends, and personal stories about country.

Our Dreaming: animating country is a celebration. It celebrates the vibrancy of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, the power of animation as a storytelling medium, and each person’s own unique story which we hope they will share with us,” said Mr Pandey.

Our Dreaming: animating country runs until 9 June 2014. For more information on the full program, visit slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries: Cinnamon Watson Publicity | 0432 219 643 | cinn@cinnamonwatsopublicity.com.au

3 Mar 2014

Your chance to discover a unique Queensland story

Your chance to discover a unique Queensland story

You have two weeks to apply for State Library of Queensland’s annual history research fellowships and be awarded up to $20,000 to explore Queensland’s history.

State Library of Queensland (SLQ) is offering two fellowships in 2014, with the $20,000 John Oxley Library Fellowship awarded for a project to explore the state’s history, and the inaugural $15,000 Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship awarded for a project to explore the state’s business history.

For the last ten years, Fellows at State Library have delved into the original materials in the John Oxley Library (JOL) to create new knowledge about all aspects of Queensland’s history, from architecture and natural disasters to food, music and migration.

In 2014 SLQ hopes to further expand this body of research into the field of economic and business history, with the introduction of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship.

This fellowship is an initiative of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, a partnership between State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Library Foundation, and QUT Business School.

The Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship aims to draw out some of the remarkable stories of our state’s entrepreneurs and business leaders from the rich materials in the John Oxley Library.

At a public talk at SLQ last month the current John Oxley Library Fellows, Kathleen Mary Fallon and Matthew Nagas, shared their discoveries from the JOL collection as part of their ongoing research for their project A Commemorative Pilgrimage of Significant Sites: The Australian South Sea Islanders from Tweed Heads to Torres Strait.

In researching sites meaningful to Australian South Sea Islanders, the pair has split their research geographically, with Mr Nagas focusing on his hometown of Bundaberg and surrounding Wide Bay region and Ms Fallon concentrating on Brisbane, South East Queensland and surrounds.

In her talk, Ms Fallon remarked on the importance of the John Oxley Library for recording and interpreting Queensland history.
“The John Oxley Library, alongside Queensland State Archives and Queensland Museum among others, is itself a significant site for Australian South Sea Islanders due to the wealth of information about their history in the area.”

“The breadth and richness of the content available means that the John Oxley Library is contributing to and creating a continuous presence and memory of Australian South Sea Islanders in Queensland,” Ms Fallon said.

With more than 10,000 original materials in the collection, the John Oxley Library presents innumerable opportunities for researchers, writers, filmmakers, academics, artists and storytellers — or anyone seeking to contribute to our state’s history.

Applications for both fellowships close at 5pm on Monday 17 March, and the winners will be announced at the Queensland Memory Awards Ceremony on 29 May.

Visit www.slq.qld.gov.au for more information on the fellowships and to apply.

Media enquiries:
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
t. 07 3842 9847 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

14 Jan 2014

Local library helping Queenslanders to navigate the online world

Local library helping Queenslanders to navigate the online world

Caboolture Library has been recognised by State Library of Queensland (SLQ) for its role in helping people to navigate the online world.

Located within innovative business and technology precinct The Hub, Caboolture Library has been awarded a prize for its outstanding support of the Looking @ 2.0 program, an online guide to web technologies developed by SLQ and supported by more than 150 libraries throughout the state.

Since Looking @ 2.0 was launched in July 2013 the library has been a keen supporter of the program, delivering 14 facilitated training sessions to the public and helping over 50 local residents to get connected.

Looking @ 2.0 covers a range of topics from connecting to and searching the internet to accessing online services and using web technologies for personal or professional development.

Moreton Bay Regional Council’s Lifestyle and Amenities spokesperson, Councillor Julie Greer, said the Looking @ 2.0 program had been particularly helpful for older residents who wanted to do more with their internet connections than send and receive emails.

"What I love about Looking @ 2.0 is that it helps to take the mystery out of the internet, as well as exploring ways of using technology to make life more convenient in a safe and easy to understand environment," Cr Greer said.

"I thank State Library of Queensland for partnering with council to deliver this important program to
the residents of the Moreton Bay Region."

State Librarian Janette Wright said that Looking @ 2.0 was a fantastic opportunity for those who feel disconnected from or daunted by technology.

"Online resources have enormous potential to both streamline and enrich your day-to-day life. We hope that this course will empower people to make the most of the online services available to them."

Looking @ 2.0 is free and participants can register online. Support is available via email, over the phone and at workshops hosted by participating libraries.

Register for Looking @ 2.0 at learning.slq.qld.gov.au

Media enquiries:Nicole Mangelsdorf, SLQ Communications
t. 07 3842 9084 | Nicole.Mangelsdorf@slq.qld.gov.au

Looking @ 2.0 is supported by OPAL funding

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For more information about any of these stories or about current or earlier releases, please contact Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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