Media releases

View current and recent media releases from the State Library. For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

 

13 Feb 2015

Architects share ideas at State Library

Architects share ideas at State Library

Hear from internationally renowned architects at State Library of Queensland (SLQ) with the return of the annual UQ Architecture lecture series next month.

A partnership between SLQ’s Asia Pacific Design Library and The University of Queensland’s School of Architecture, this free, weekly talk series brings together forward-thinking architects from across Queensland, Australia and the globe to critically explore architectural ideas and issues.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the 2015 series intended to spark discussion and debate around 21st century architectural challenges, continuing State Library’s past work in this space.

“Our goal is to encourage our audience to expand their understanding of the role of architecture in society and how it affects the well-being of our communities,” Ms Wright said.

“The design of the built environment has significant implications for everyday life.”

“As we move to a more globally connected world and encounter complex new questions, the architectural profession is being challenged to adapt and to embrace the responsibility of designing a better world,” she said.

The Asia Pacific Design Library (APDL) is dedicated to promoting the role of architecture and design to the broader society and, alongside UQ, to bringing research into the design studio to generate new knowledge.

Series curator, John de Manincor, Senior Lecturer at UQ said, “The series is about sharing ideas with anyone interested in the design of the spaces they inhabit. Working with APDL is a fabulous opportunity for UQ Architecture to engage with the wider community, as well as the profession.”

Andrew Burges from New South Wales-based firm Andrew Burges Architects (ABA) will launch the series on the evening of Tuesday 10 March at 6.30pm, with networking and refreshments from 6pm.

The series runs for eight consecutive weeks through March and April (excluding Easter, Tuesday 7 April), with architects from Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, London, Hong Kong and Shanghai.

Visit designonline.org.au for the full list of sessions and speakers, alongside a range of content including video recordings, which will be made available after each event.

Architecture professionals attending the events will be eligible for two formal continuing professional development points (CPD) with the Australian Institute of Architects.

Date      Tuesdays, 10 Mar – 5 May (excl. 7 Apr), 6pm for 6.30pm start
Venue    Part 1 – The Edge Auditorium
               Part 2 – Auditorium 1, State Library of Queensland
Entry     Free, bookings slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on


Media enquiries:
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9084 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

2 Feb 2015

Applications closing soon for Research and Creative Artists’ Books Fellowships

Applications closing soon for Research & Creative Artists’ Books Fellowships

State Library of Queensland (SLQ), with the generous support of the Siganto Foundation, is offering two $9,000 Artists’ Books Fellowships with applications closing 27 February.

Defined as ‘artworks that use the form or concept of a book’, artists’ books subject matter is only limited by the artist’s imagination — as is the format. The Australian Library of Art is home to State Library’s extensive and nationally significant collection of beautiful and intriguing artists’ books.

The Creative Fellowship allows a practitioner to develop a new work based on SLQ collections, while the Research Fellowship supports a  researcher to explore State Library’s artists’ books collection to generate new knowledge in the field of artists’ books.

State Librarian Janette Wright said State Library’s ongoing partnership with the Siganto Foundation provided valuable support for the promotion of artists’ books in Queensland.

She said “the Siganto Foundation has been significant in supporting artists’ books activities at SLQ including funding workshops with internationally recognised book artists, seminars to further artists’ book discourse, acquisition of collection items and fellowships for research and the creation of artists’ books.”

Doug Spowart, the 2014 Siganto Foundation Artists’ Books Research Fellow said the fellowship had allowed him to investigate trends in the use of photography in artists’ books.

Jan Davis, the 2014 Siganto Foundation Artists’ Books Creative Fellow is undertaking a three-stage project to examine diaries and farm records from the State Library collection and transfigure them as artist’s books.

Each Siganto Foundation Fellowship offers a stipend of $9,000, priority access to the collections, and research support from specialist librarians.

Fellowship applications close at 5pm on Friday 27 February 2015. Forms are available online from the SLQ website.

Media enquiries:
Cathy Stacey, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9346 | cathy.stacey@slq.qld.gov.au

27 Jan 2015

State Library research fellowships award up to $20,000

State Library research fellowships award up to $20,000

Applications are now open nationwide for State Library of Queensland’s annual history research fellowships, for awards of up to $20,000.

State Librarian Janette Wright today invited applications for both the John Oxley Library Fellowship supported by the Queensland Library Foundation ($20,000) and the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship ($15,000).

The Fellowships, as part of the broader Queensland Memory Awards, are awarded annually to acknowledge excellence and innovation in historical research and to foster future exploration into our state’s history.

“Each year State Library selects two Fellows as our resident researchers to contribute to a greater understanding of Queensland’s heritage,” said Ms Wright.

“Applications are welcomed from people of all professional backgrounds and historical interests as Fellowship outcomes may be quite diverse,” she said.

“Projects may include a publication, an online engagement, a cultural activity or product, or a curatorial contribution to the John Oxley Library collection.”

“These Fellowships enable researchers to investigate our state’s past, and to find innovative ways to uncover and share this history with others.”

In addition to the stipend, the successful Fellows will each be provided with a personal workspace in the Neil Roberts Research Lounge within the John Oxley Library where they have ready access to State Library’s rich resources as well as staff expertise.

Since 2004, Fellows have delved into the unique collections in the John Oxley Library to research, evaluate and document forgotten narratives across diverse topics including architecture, migration, classical music, politics, and Queensland’s ongoing ties with Pacific and South Sea Islander peoples.

The current John Oxley Library Fellow, Thomas Blake, is using the John Oxley Library collections in the completion of his project Liquid Gold: the history of the Great Artesian Basin in Queensland.

Thom will be giving a free public talk at State Library on Thursday 19 February, discussing his research to date into the Great Artesian Basin and its role in serving and sustaining more than 30 Queensland towns.

Now in its second year, the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship is awarded for a proposed research project that examines an aspect of Queensland’s business history.

The Fellowship facilitates deeper engagement with State Library’s business records, so Queenslanders can learn the stories of our state’s commercial, social and economic development.

The inaugural Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame Fellowship was awarded to fashion innovators Madeleine King and Nadia Buick (The Fashion Archives) for their project to examine 12 key Queensland businesses and their impact on the communities around them.

This Fellowship is an initiative of the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame, a partnership between State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Library Foundation and QUT Business School.

Applications for both Fellowships close at 5pm on Monday 16 March 2015.

The winners will be announced on Thursday 28 May at the annual Queensland Memory Awards Ceremony, alongside the recipients of the John Oxley Library Award and the John Oxley Library Community History Award.

To apply or for more information on the Fellowships and the Queensland Memory Awards visit www.slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries:
Cinnamon Watson
t: 0432 219 643 | e: cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

19 Jan 2015

How might design shape our future?

How might design shape our future?

State Library of Queensland invites visitors to explore the world of design thinking at CUSP: Designing into the Next Decade, before it closes next month.

Open until 14 February, CUSP is a free exhibition featuring the work of 12 visionary Australian designers who are each developing creative solutions to some of the big challenges we face today and into the future.

From designing sustainable cities inspired by structures in nature such as soap bubbles and spider webs, to interactive games that may be the future of exercise, the exhibition showcases some of the most exciting ideas currently being explored by Australian designers.

State Librarian and CEO Janette Wright said State Library was pleased to host the Brisbane show of this prestigious, nationally touring exhibition developed by Object: Australian Design Centre.

“We’ve been delighted by the response of visitors to the exhibition so far, and pleased to see how it has helped ignite curiosity about what the future might hold,” said Ms Wright.

“Exploring questions as broad and varied as ‘Can design help prevent people from getting sick?’ to ‘Can we think bigger, more imaginatively, and more creatively about sustainability?’, CUSP gets people thinking in new and innovative ways — and that’s exactly what a visit to a library should do. With only a few weeks remaining of the exhibition’s stay in Brisbane, I encourage everyone — from inquisitive children through to professional designers — to drop by and take a look,” she said.

An exhibition, a laboratory and an opportunity for learning and experiencing new ideas, CUSP takes us beyond what we believe is possible when we think of design today.

CUSP: Designing into the Next Decade will be at State Library of Queensland until 14 February 2015. Visit www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for more details.

CUSP: Designing into the Next Decade is an Object: Australian Design Centre National Touring Program. Object: Australian Design Centre has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. Object: Australian Design Centre is supported by the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

Interviews and more images are available upon request. 

Media enquiries:
Malia Naupoto, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9847 | malia.naupoto@slq.qld.gov.au

16 Jan 2015

State Library offers opportunities for Indigenous artists and communities

State Library offers opportunities for Indigenous artists and communities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and community organisations across Queensland are being offered the chance to exhibit and work with State Library of Queensland.

State Library will launch two community programs this year, inviting Queensland Indigenous artists into kuril dhagun at South Bank.

Expressions of interest are now sought statewide for the individual artist in residence program and from individuals, community groups and art centres for a co-curated exhibition in kuril dhagun.

The artist in residence will commence in February to work on a three month-long creative project under the theme ‘unsettled’.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the residency program aimed to connect State Library’s collections with community knowledge from Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists.

“By bringing their unique individual and community perspectives to their work, our resident artist will be able to contribute new stories and knowledge about Queensland to State Library’s collections,” said Ms Wright.

“The artist in residence will have access to original materials and collection items here at State Library to inspire their project, fostering strong cultural and professional exchange.”

The program is open to both emerging and established Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander artists working in any creative medium.

Expressions of interest close Friday 23 January 2015 for a three month residency commencing in either February or July 2015.

The residency will culminate in a temporary art installation in kuril dhagun’s exhibition space at the State Library building at South Bank.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, community groups and art centres are also encouraged to submit an expression of interest to co-curate a three month long exhibition in kuril dhagun.

“We’re inviting artists and community organisations to share their collections with State Library through an exhibition — whether it be a retrospective or a showcase of new work, to commemorate an anniversary or special event, or something else entirely,” said Ms Wright.

“These co-curated exhibitions will focus on working with, by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and we are eager to let kuril dhagun’s exhibition program be developed in partnership with the community for six months of the year to serve this purpose.”
 
Expressions of interest close Friday 20 February 2015 for a three month exhibition commencing in either May or August 2015.

To submit an expression of interest, apply online at www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/programs

Media enquiries: Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9084 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

14 Jan 2015

Asia Pacific artwork for display at State Library

Asia Pacific artwork for display at State Library

State Library of Queensland is giving designers from the Asia Pacific an opportunity to develop and display their work in the Asia Pacific Design Library.

State Librarian Janette Wright said State Library was seeking proposals for an installation of a new and innovative work that demonstrated connections between Australia and the Asia Pacific region through design.

“Designers will be asked to explore the future of one of our key areas of collection — better living, communication, design thinking, fashion, and public places — and reflect on how it can be used to foster connections between the Asia Pacific and Australia,” said Ms Wright.

“Designers will also be required to provide insight into their design process from concept to completion. In doing so, we hope the project will provide inspiration for our visitors as an exemplar of design in action.”

State Library, through the Asia Pacific Design Library, aims to develop the best publicly accessible collection of design resources in the Asia Pacific, promoting contemporary thought and analysis on design in the region.

“Libraries are in a unique position to engage audiences in the creation of new content and new knowledge in creative and innovative ways,” said Ms Wright.

“We are pleased to be able to support an up-and-coming designer from the Asia Pacific, and are looking forward to sharing new perspectives on design from this region,” she said.

Proposals close at 5pm, Friday 6 March 2015. The successful applicant will work with the Asia Pacific Design Library team to develop their work and display it at State Library for 12 months from June 2015.

Visit www.designonline.org.au for more information.



Media enquiries:
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
07 3840 9084 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au

12 Dec 2014

First World War Fellowships

First World War research fellowships announced

State Library of Queensland’s inaugural Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation fellowships, proudly supported by the Queensland Government, have been announced today.

Four Fellows from varied backgrounds will be awarded $15,000 each to fund their research project relating to Queensland’s experience of the First World War.

Fellows will use Queensland’s primary documentary heritage collections in the John Oxley Library, Queensland State Archives and Queensland Museum in the fulfilment of their fellowship.

The 2014 Fellows are: Elaine Acworth, multi-award winning playwright; Dr Neville Buch, historical consultant and author; Robert Hogg, published researcher and writer; and local Brisbane performer and composer, John Thompson.

State Librarian Janette Wright said a great response was received in the fellowship program’s first year.
“Many applications successfully outlined how their proposed project could contribute to new knowledge about Queensland and the First World War, although four applications in particular stood out as exciting, impressive proposals that State Library is proud to support,” Ms Wright said.

“The 2014 Fellows have presented projects that will uncover and interpret Queensland’s experience of the First World War in compelling ways, including the development of a dramatic work, a study of Queensland’s intellectual history, a musical composition and performance based on wartime censorship, and a research project exploring soldiers’ sense of identity and belonging.”

Elaine Acworth’s proposed dramatic work My Father’s Wars follows the story of her own father who fought in both world wars. Elaine’s story personalises the costs and rewards of massive continental conflict half a world away through the life of a Queensland man and his family, in an intimate and known context.

Dr Neville Buch’s project Queensland community thinkers and their social-political formations during World War I: passion and reason for war and peace 1914–19 will examine the diversity of opinion and shifting attitudes of Queenslanders during this tumultuous time.

John Thompson will bring new knowledge to light through a distinctly Queensland project entitled Censors, Conscripts & Queensland – J.J. Stable and the Battle for Hansard. Mr Thompson’s research will focus on the Stable collection which includes Hansard No. 37, a record of Premier T.J. Ryan’s controversial speech which was ordered to be destroyed by Prime Minister Billy Hughes. One of only three copies of Hansard No. 37 that survived the Prime Minister’s orders is held in the John Oxley Library.

Robert Hogg’s research project, Queensland’s soldiers: place, identity and stories of belonging in the First World War investigates the largely unexplored themes of identify, place and belonging. Using the diaries, photographs and personal letters of soldiers who went to Gallipoli and the Western front, Mr Hogg will explore soldiers’ attachment to their home state and how they identified themselves as Queenslanders.

Arts Minister Ian Walker congratulated the winning Fellows.

“I am impressed with the depth and range of these projects,” Mr Walker said. “They will give us new perspectives of Queensland’s experience of the First World War and its many impacts. It will be fascinating to see how the Fellows use Queensland’s key heritage collections, including the John Oxley Library, to
expand our understanding of the First World War and this important time in Queensland’s history.”

The annual fellowship program is part of Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation, a five year legacy project led by State Library and proudly supported by the Queensland Government, commemorating the centenary of the First World War and Anzac across Queensland.

For more information on the fellowships and Q ANZAC 100 visit www.qanzac100.slq.qld.gov.au.

Media enquiries:
Kirri-Lee Huggett, SLQ Communications e: kirri-lee.huggett@slq.qld.gov.au, p: 07 3842 9803

8 Dec 2014

Queensland Literary Awards winners

Queensland Literary Awards announced at State Library

The Queensland Literary Awards winners were tonight announced at State Library of Queensland, honouring talented Australian writers.

The distinguished list of winners saw many of Australia’s renowned and much loved authors recognised alongside debut and up-and-coming writers.

Winners Richard Flanagan, Paul Ham, David Malouf, Joan Beaumont, Ceridwen Dovey, Jaclyn Moriarty, Shaun Tan, Jackie French, Kellee Slater, Cathy McLennan, and Lesley and Tammy Williams were presented with their awards at a ceremony held at State Library.
 
State Librarian Janette Wright said the Queensland Literary Awards were a testament to the passion for writing and literature in our community.

“The Awards have grown out of community support and a great love of literature,” said Ms Wright. “We are grateful for the continued goodwill for the Awards and would like to thank and acknowledge the exceptional support of our key award partners the Copyright Agency Limited Cultural Fund, The Courier-Mail, The University of Queensland, Griffith University, the University of Southern Queensland, Claire Booth, the University of Queensland Press and the Queensland Writers Centre.”

Chair of the Queensland Literary Awards Dr Stuart Glover said this year the judges had narrowed down an impressive list of 450 books and manuscripts to just 11 winners across ten categories.

“These books, the winners, and the notable shortlists, remind us of the diverse things that books can do and the invention and creativity with which writers undertake their work.  The awards acknowledge the quality of contemporary writing and point readers towards works that might be of interest to them or important in helping us to think about who we are as a community,” said Dr Glover.

“For some books, like Paul Ham’s 1914: The Year the World Ended, winner of the non-fiction prize, the politics and ideas are on the surface. Ham tells the always relevant story about how political hubris dragged us into the Great War 100 years ago. In others, like Jaclyn Moriarty’s The Cracks in the Kingdom, which took out the Young Adult Prize, the writing is playful and literally fantastic. But underneath the fascinating tale of characters caught between a real and an imagined world is an exploration of our hopes for the unity of our families.  Among the winners we see a sweep of ideas. David Malouf’s poetry collection Earth Hour examines the planet and people and space at a precarious moment in its history. These are works of labour and imagination,” he said.

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan, winner of the Fiction Book prize, is a novel of abundant range and depth that will undoubtedly become regarded as one of the great works of Australian literature. It has already been recognised internationally — winning the Booker prize earlier this year.
The strength of Australian writing for children is highlighted this year in the exceptional quality of the shortlist. In awarding joint winners the panel acknowledged that whilst very different books both Refuge by Jackie French and Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan are truly outstanding works offering children and adults alike a profound literary experience capable of changing hearts and minds,” said Dr Glover.


Media enquiries
Cinnamon Watson Publicity ~ 0432 219 643 ~ cinn@cinnamonwatsonpublicity.com.au

 
Queensland Literary Award Winners 2014

University of Queensland Fiction Book Award:
The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

University of Queensland Non-Fiction Book Award:
1914: The Year the World Ended by Paul Ham

University of Southern Queensland History Book Award:
Broken Nation by Joan Beaumont

University of Southern Queensland Australian Short Story Collection - Steele Rudd Award:
Only the Animals by Ceridwen Dovey

State Library of Queensland Poetry Collection - Judith Wright Calanthe Award:
Earth Hour by David Malouf

Griffith University Young Adult Book Award:
The Cracks in the Kingdom by Jaclyn Moriarty

Griffith University Children's Book Award:
Joint winners:
Refuge by Jackie French
Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan

Emerging Queensland Writer Manuscript Award:
We Come From Saltwater People by Cathy McLennan

Unpublished Indigenous Writer - David Unaipon Award:
It’s Not Just Black and White by Lesley & Tammy Williams

The Courier-Mail People’s Choice Queensland Book of the Year
How to do a liver transplant: Stories from my surgical life by Kellee Slater

1 Dec 2014

Summer Reading Club 2014-15

Choose your own reading adventure this summer

This summer young readers will be dodging danger, outwitting enemies and journeying beyond their wildest imagination with State Library of Queensland’s popular Summer Reading Club.

The Summer Reading Club is a free national literacy program developed by State Library and run online and in more than 1,000 public libraries across Australia.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the Summer Reading Club offered an exciting array of free adventure-inspired creative activities designed to stimulate an ongoing love of reading and literature and spark the library habit.

“From Indiana Jones to Bear Grylls and the Famous Five, adventure has a way of capturing the imagination of young readers,” said Ms Wright. “We’re tapping into that excitement to keep children reading all summer long.”

“Research has shown that children who read for pleasure are often the best readers. The Summer Reading Club promotes a love of books and encourages continued reading over the holiday period,” said Ms Wright.

Last year, nearly 35,000 Australian children joined the Summer Reading Club, and read more than 230,000 books over the summer period.

To join the club, visit your local public library or go online www.summerreadingclub.org.au to play games and competitions where you can win great prizes, read book raves, and to chat with other book lovers.

This year, club members can sample newly released titles of 21 Aussie authors and illustrators, search for answers in the Encyclopaedia Britannica online scavenger hunt,  craft adventuresome endings to a story started by Word Hunters Nick Earls and Terry Whidborne, and Australian National Children’s Laureate Jackie French, and write their own adventure short stories.

Information for parents and carers is also available to help make the most of the summer holidays.
Arts Minister Ian Walker said the State Library was encouraging an early love of reading through innovative programs that tapped into young imaginations.

“We can’t love something if we don’t know about it and by offering our youngest citizens a chance to explore a wide selection of books and authors, the annual Summer Reading Club helps children improve literacy skills,” Mr Walker said.

“The Queensland Government supports programs such as the Summer Reading Club and the recently announced Best Start Queensland: family literacy initiative, a $20 million program to give families the information and tools they need to help children develop early language and literacy.”

The Summer Reading Club is delivered in partnership with the Australian Library and Information Association, and public libraries across Australia.

Summer Reading Club
1 December 2014 – 31 January 2015
SummerReadingClub.org.au or at your local public library

Media Contact
Alexia Saeck, SLQ Communications | alexia.saeck@slq.qld.gov.au | 07 3840 7784

1 Dec 2014

Explore Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identities through portraiture

Explore Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identities through portraiture

Visit kuril dhagun at State Library of Queensland from Saturday 6 December to discover portraits of Queensland’s unique Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander personalities.

A Thousand Words is a free exhibition that launches this Saturday, and features the striking works of two Indigenous female artists: Cheryl Creed and Nickeema Williams.

Working in the contrasting mediums of paint and digital photography, Cheryl and Nickeema explore the vast diversity of individuals in their own and other Indigenous communities.

State Librarian Janette Wright said the artists’ thought provoking works remind us that identity can be fleeting and highly subjective.

“The subjects in Cheryl and Nickeema’s stunning portraits range from young to elderly, friends and family to community leaders, hailing from across the state in Brisbane, Cherbourg, Woorabinda, Cairns and beyond,” she said.

“Yet each portrait is alike in that the subject is captured in a single moment in time, reflecting who they are and what they represent in that instant.”

Cheryl’s and Nickeema’s works convey pride in culture; connection to Country and the environment; the closeness of family and community; and an intimacy not often experienced in the wider community.

Each of the faces looking back at us in A Thousand Words prompts questions of ‘who are you?’, ‘where are you from?’ and ‘who’s your mob?’, illustrating the common saying ‘a picture speaks a thousand words’.

Both Cheryl and Nickeema work predominantly out of Cairns, using their art to change the circumstances of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Queensland.

Cheryl believes her artwork can play a role in improving education in non-Indigenous communities and removing the negative stereotypes that surround Indigenous Australian communities today.

“Portraiture is a universal language that transcends most barriers, and reaches out to different audiences to tell the many and varied stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and describe the richness of our cultures and history,” she said.

Nickeema similarly uses her art to express culture and to address issues of identity, race, stereotypes, as well as personally finding her place as a young Indigenous woman in urbanised society.

“My art is my life; it is an extension of my very being,” she said.

“I hope to one day use art as a means of teaching, taking it into rural communities to show young women the difference they can make to the world around them.”

Over the six month exhibition period, kuril dhagun will also host a range of hands-on public programs including a weekly exhibition tour, A Thousand Footprints, and a monthly craft-based workshop series, A Thousand Fibres, where participants create a range of handmade arts and crafts under the direction of talented Indigenous arts-workers.

A Thousand Words will be on display in kuril dhagun at State Library from 6 December 2014 until 17 May 2015.

Visit www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on for more information and to book tours and workshops.

Media enquiries:
Shahedah Sabdia, SLQ Communications
07 3842 9084 | shahedah.sabdia@slq.qld.gov.au
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For more information about any of these stories or about earlier releases, please contact Marketing and Communications on +61 7 3842 9847 or by email to communications@slq.qld.gov.au.

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